stance


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stance

 (stăns)
n.
1. The attitude or position of a standing person or animal, especially the position assumed by an athlete preparatory to action. See Synonyms at posture.
2. A position or point of view: "Peru ... toughened its stance toward foreign investors" (Abraham Lowenthal).

[French, position, from Italian stanza, from Vulgar Latin *stantia, from Latin stāns, stant-, present participle of stāre, to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

stance

(stæns; stɑːns)
n
1. the manner and position in which a person or animal stands
2. (Ball Games, other than specified) sport the posture assumed when about to play the ball, as in golf, cricket, etc
3. general emotional or intellectual attitude: a leftist stance.
4. (Automotive Engineering) Scot a place where buses or taxis wait
5. (Mountaineering) mountaineering a place at the top of a pitch where a climber can stand and belay
[C16: via French from Italian stanza place for standing, from Latin stāns, from stāre to stand]

stance

(stæns)

n.
1. the position or bearing of the body while standing.
2. a mental or emotional position adopted with respect to something.
3. Sports. the relative position of the feet, as in addressing a golf ball.
[1525–35; < Old French estance (standing) position < Vulgar Latin *stantia, derivative of Latin stant- (s. of stāns), present participle of stāre to stand]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stance - standing posture
posture, attitude, position - the arrangement of the body and its limbs; "he assumed an attitude of surrender"
address - the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball
attention - a motionless erect stance with arms at the sides and feet together; assumed by military personnel during drill or review; "the troops stood at attention"
erectness, uprightness - the property of being upright in posture
2.stance - a rationalized mental attitude
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
hard line - a firm and uncompromising stance or position; "the governor took a hard line on drugs"
point of view, standpoint, viewpoint, stand - a mental position from which things are viewed; "we should consider this problem from the viewpoint of the Russians"; "teaching history gave him a special point of view toward current events"

stance

noun
1. attitude, stand, position, viewpoint, standpoint They have maintained a consistently neutral stance.
2. posture, carriage, bearing, deportment The woman detective shifted her stance from one foot to another.

stance

noun
1. The way in which a person holds or carries his or her body:
2. A frame of mind affecting one's thoughts or behavior:
Translations
وَقْفَه
postoj
holdning
asento
staîa
stāja
duruş

stance

[stæns] N
1. (lit) → postura f
2. (fig) → actitud f
to take up a stanceadoptar una actitud
3. (Scot) (= taxi rank) → parada f (de taxis)

stance

[ˈstæns] n
(= way of standing) → position f
(= attitude) → position f

stance

n (= posture, Sport) → Haltung f; (= mental attitude also)Einstellung f; (Cricket, Golf etc also) → Stand m; to take up a stance (lit)in Stellung gehen; (fig)eine Haltung einnehmen

stance

[stæns] n
a. (way of standing) → posizione f
b. (attitude) → presa di posizione f

stance

(staːns) noun
a person's position or manner of standing, eg in playing golf, cricket etc.
References in classic literature ?
He took the peg switchboard of the telegraph, for in- stance, and developed it to its highest point, to a point that was not even imagined possible by any one else.
He accepted new environment and circum- stance with great coolness, eating from his haver- sack at every opportunity.
On one was piled certain curiously twisted and complicated figures, called “nut-cakes,” On another were heaps of a black-looking sub stance, which, receiving its hue from molasses, was properly termed “sweet-cake ;” a wonderful favorite in the coterie of Remarkable, A third was filled, to use the language of the housekeeper, with “cards of gingerbread ;” and the last held a “ plum- cake,” so called from the number of large raisins that were showing their black heads in a substance of suspiciously similar color.
This in stance of neglect is characteristic of utter discour agement.
It was the first in- stance of harm being attempted to be done to me --at any rate, the first I had ever found out.
The shell of the circum- stances of his life was broken and he was compelled to start forth.
The noise at night would have been annoying to me ordinarily, but I didn't mind it in the present circum- stances, because it kept me from hearing the quacks detaching legs and arms from the day's cripples.
In them circum- stances it warn't no trouble to him to throw in an amount of style that was suitable.
It was deep, and dark, and awful; the hour, the circum- stances, the surroundings, were in keeping with it.
In the course of his Narrative, he relates two in- stances of murderous cruelty,--in one of which a planter deliberately shot a slave belonging to a neigh- boring plantation, who had unintentionally gotten within his lordly domain in quest of fish; and in the other, an overseer blew out the brains of a slave who had fled to a stream of water to escape a bloody scourging.
I think there is a good deal of moral strength in helping people in suchcircum stances.
Events have occurred which have not improved his temper, and in more in stances than one he has not been allowed to have his own way.