stanchion


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stan·chion

 (stăn′chən, -shən)
n.
1. An upright pole, post, or support.
2. A framework consisting of two or more vertical bars, used to secure cattle in a stall or at a feed trough.
tr.v. stan·chioned, stan·chion·ing, stan·chions
1. To equip with stanchions.
2. To confine (cattle) by means of stanchions.

[Middle English stanchon, from Old French estanchon, probably from estance, act of standing upright, prop, from estans, present participle of ester, to stand, from Latin stāre; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

stanchion

(ˈstɑːnʃən)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) any vertical pole, rod, etc, used as a support
vb
(Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to provide or support with a stanchion or stanchions
[C14: from Old French estanchon, from estance, from Vulgar Latin stantia (unattested) a standing, from Latin stāre to stand]

stan•chion

(ˈstæn ʃən)

n.
1. an upright bar, beam, post, or support, as in a window, stall, or ship.
v.t.
2. to furnish with stanchions.
3. to secure by or to a stanchion or stanchions.
[1375–1425; late Middle English stanchon < Old French estanchon=estanche (variant of estance prop, support; see stance) + -on n. suffix]

stanchion


Past participle: stanchioned
Gerund: stanchioning

Imperative
stanchion
stanchion
Present
I stanchion
you stanchion
he/she/it stanchions
we stanchion
you stanchion
they stanchion
Preterite
I stanchioned
you stanchioned
he/she/it stanchioned
we stanchioned
you stanchioned
they stanchioned
Present Continuous
I am stanchioning
you are stanchioning
he/she/it is stanchioning
we are stanchioning
you are stanchioning
they are stanchioning
Present Perfect
I have stanchioned
you have stanchioned
he/she/it has stanchioned
we have stanchioned
you have stanchioned
they have stanchioned
Past Continuous
I was stanchioning
you were stanchioning
he/she/it was stanchioning
we were stanchioning
you were stanchioning
they were stanchioning
Past Perfect
I had stanchioned
you had stanchioned
he/she/it had stanchioned
we had stanchioned
you had stanchioned
they had stanchioned
Future
I will stanchion
you will stanchion
he/she/it will stanchion
we will stanchion
you will stanchion
they will stanchion
Future Perfect
I will have stanchioned
you will have stanchioned
he/she/it will have stanchioned
we will have stanchioned
you will have stanchioned
they will have stanchioned
Future Continuous
I will be stanchioning
you will be stanchioning
he/she/it will be stanchioning
we will be stanchioning
you will be stanchioning
they will be stanchioning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stanchioning
you have been stanchioning
he/she/it has been stanchioning
we have been stanchioning
you have been stanchioning
they have been stanchioning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stanchioning
you will have been stanchioning
he/she/it will have been stanchioning
we will have been stanchioning
you will have been stanchioning
they will have been stanchioning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stanchioning
you had been stanchioning
he/she/it had been stanchioning
we had been stanchioning
you had been stanchioning
they had been stanchioning
Conditional
I would stanchion
you would stanchion
he/she/it would stanchion
we would stanchion
you would stanchion
they would stanchion
Past Conditional
I would have stanchioned
you would have stanchioned
he/she/it would have stanchioned
we would have stanchioned
you would have stanchioned
they would have stanchioned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stanchion - any vertical post or rod used as a support
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
Translations

stanchion

[ˈstɑːnʃən] Npuntal m, montante m
References in classic literature ?
Then they tucked the old man into a beauti- ful room, which was the spare room, and in the night some time he got powerful thirsty and clumb out on to the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and broke his left arm in two places, and was most froze to death when somebody found him after sun-up.
in to the handle, while I pulled at the stanchion and pushed with my feet.
I threw the bow hard up, dragged the speed lever to its last notch, and clutching a stanchion with one hand and the steering-wheel with the other hung on like grim death and consigned my soul to its author.
Below deck the terrified girl clung desperately to a stanchion as the stricken ship lunged sickeningly before the hurricane.
Hist, now, between you an' meself and the stanchion there, this Wolf Larsen is a regular devil, an' the Ghost'll be a hell-ship like she's always ben since he had hold iv her.
Captain MacWhirr, unprepared, took a run and brought himself up with a jerk by an awning stanchion.
I have no objection to any amount of blue sky in its proper place (it can be found at the 4000 level for practically twelve months out of the year), but I submit, with all deference to the educational needs of Transylvania, that "skylarking" in the centre of a main-travelled road where, at the best of times, electricity literally drips off one's stanchions and screw blades, is unnecessary.
Upright pipes, serving as stanchions, were being screwed into the top of the Arangi's rail so that they served to support three strands of barbed wire that ran completely around the vessel, being broken only at the gangway for a narrow space of fifteen inches.
On several starlight nights we danced on the upper deck, under the awnings, and made something of a ball-room display of brilliancy by hanging a number of ship's lanterns to the stanchions.
Golden stanchions supported a chain of gold encircling it and leading down into the water on either side of marble steps.
The wind roared like thunder, and blew with such force that it was with difficulty that even strong men kept their feet, or clung with grim clasp to the iron stanchions.
Then Caderousse sat astride the coping, and drawing up his ladder passed it over the wall; then he began to descend, or rather to slide down by the two stanchions, which he did with an ease which proved how accustomed he was to the exercise.