stands


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stand

 (stănd)
v. stood (sto͝od), stand·ing, stands
v.intr.
1.
a. To rise to an upright position on the feet.
b. To assume or maintain an upright position as specified: stand straight; stand to one side.
2.
a. To maintain an upright position on the feet.
b. To maintain an upright or vertical position on a base or support: The urn stands on a pedestal.
c. To be placed or situated: The building stands at the corner.
3.
a. To remain stable, upright, or intact: The old school still stands.
b. To remain valid, effective, or unaltered: The agreement stands.
4. To be or show a specified figure or amount: The balance stands at $500.
5. To measure a specified height when in an upright position: stands six feet tall.
6. To take up or maintain a specified position, altitude, or course: He stands on his earlier offer. We will stand firm.
7. To be in a position of possible gain or loss: She stands to make a fortune.
8.
a. To be in a specified state or condition: I stand corrected. We stand in awe of the view.
b. To exist in a particular form: Send the message as it now stands.
9. To be at a specified level on a scale or in an amount: stands third in her class; stands high in reputation.
10.
a. To come to a stop; remain motionless.
b. To remain stationary or inactive: The car stood in the garage all winter.
11. To remain without flowing or being disturbed; be or become stagnant.
12. Nautical To take or hold a particular course or direction: a ship standing to windward.
13. To be available as a sire. Used of horses.
14. Chiefly British To be a candidate for public office.
v.tr.
1. To cause to stand; place upright.
2. To engage in or encounter: stand battle.
3.
a. To resist successfully; withstand: stand the test of time; will not stand close examination.
b. To put up with patiently or resolutely; bear: can't stand the heat. See Synonyms at endure.
4. To submit to or undergo: stand trial.
5. To tolerate and benefit from: I could stand a good night's sleep.
6. To perform the duty of: stand guard.
7. Informal To treat (someone) or pay the cost of (food or drink): She stood him to a drink. We'll stand dinner.
n.
1. The act of standing.
2. A ceasing of work or activity; a standstill or halt.
3. A stop on a performance tour.
4. The place or station where a person stands.
5. A booth, stall, or counter for the display of goods for sale.
6. A parking space reserved for taxis.
7. A desperate or decisive effort at defense or resistance, as in a battle: made their stand at the river.
8. A position or opinion one is prepared to uphold: must take a stand on environmental issues.
9. stands Rows of wooden or metal benches placed one above another for people watching a sports event or a performance.
10. Law A witness stand.
11. A small rack, prop, or table for holding any of various articles: a music stand; a bedside stand.
12. A group or growth of tall plants or trees: a stand of pine.
Phrasal Verbs:
stand by
1. To be ready or available to act.
2. To wait for something, such as a broadcast, to resume.
3. To remain uninvolved; refrain from acting: stood by and let him get away.
4. To remain loyal to; aid or support: stands by her friends.
5. To keep or maintain: stood by her decision.
stand down
1. Law To leave a witness stand.
2. To withdraw, as from a political contest.
3. To end a state of readiness or alert.
4. To go off duty.
stand for
1. To represent; symbolize.
2. To advocate or support: stands for freedom of the press.
3. To put up with; tolerate: We will not stand for impertinent behavior.
stand in
To act as a stand-in.
stand off
1. To stay at a distance; remain apart or aloof.
2. To put off; evade.
3. Nautical To maintain a course away from shore.
stand on
1. To be based on; depend on: The success of the project stands on management's support of it.
2. To insist on observance of: stand on ceremony; stand on one's rights.
stand out
1. To protrude; project.
2. To be conspicuous, distinctive, or prominent.
3. To refuse compliance or maintain opposition; hold out: stand out against a verdict.
4. Nautical To maintain a course away from shore.
stand over
1. To watch or supervise closely.
2. To hold over; postpone.
stand to
To take up positions for action.
stand up
1. To remain valid, sound, or durable: His claim will not stand up in court. Our old car has stood up well over time.
2. Informal To fail to keep a date with.
Idioms:
stand a chance
To have a chance, as of gaining or accomplishing something.
stand (one's) ground
1. To maintain one's position against an attack.
2. To refuse to compromise; be unyielding.
stand on (one's) head
Sports To make numerous sprawling or dramatic saves. Used of a goalie.
stand on (one's) own/two feet
To be independent and responsible for oneself.
stand pat
1. To oppose or resist change.
2. Games To play one's poker hand without drawing more cards.
stand to reason
To be consistent with reason: It stands to reason that if we leave late, we will arrive late.
stand up for
1. To side with; defend.
2. To stand up with.
stand up to
To confront fearlessly; face up to.
stand up with
To act as best man or maid of honor for (the groom or bride) at a wedding.

[Middle English standen, from Old English standan; see stā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

stand′er n.

stands

  • circumstance - Literally "that which stands around (something)."
  • cost - Something that costs a particular amount literally "stands at or with" that price, from Latin constare, "to be settled or fixed, stand at a price, cost."
  • stem - The stem of a tree is etymologically the upright part, the part that "stands" up, from its Germanic base sta-, "stand."
  • wing it - Comes from theatrical jargon, referring to the hurried study of lines by an understudy in the wings, or to the help given by a prompter who stands in the wings of a theater.
Translations
tribuna
tilskuertribune
katsomo
štandovi
スタンド
판매대
läktare
อัฒจันทร์
chỗ đứng

stands

مِنْبَر tribuna tilskuertribune Tribüne κερκίδες graderías katsomo gradin štandovi bancarelle スタンド 판매대 tribunes stillstand stoiska arquibancada, bancada трибуна läktare อัฒจันทร์ tribün chỗ đứng 展台
References in classic literature ?
IN LINCOLN THE BEST part of the theatrical season came late, when the good companies stopped off there for one-night stands, after their long runs in New York and Chicago.
There was something in her attitude, in her whole appearance when she leaned her head against the high-backed chair and spread her arms, which suggested the regal woman, the one who rules, who looks on, who stands alone.
We proceeded with all possible expedition until we came within fifteen miles of where Boonsborough now stands, and where we were fired upon by a party of Indians that killed two, and wounded two of our number; yet, although surprised and taken at a disadvantage, we stood our ground.
Looked at in one way each breadth stands alone, the bloated curves and flourishes--a kind of "debased Romanesque" with delirium tremens--go waddling up and down in isolated columns of fatuity.
Waving his hands towards the flume, he said, "Look at that work of your father's; there ain't no other man in Californy but Philip Carr ez would hev the grit to hold up such a bluff agin natur and agin luck ez that yer flume stands for.
HALFWAY down a by-street of one of our New England towns stands a rusty wooden house, with seven acutely peaked gables, facing towards various points of the compass, and a huge, clustered chimney in the midst.
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
It stands on a knoll, surrounded by locust, trees and lofty elms, from among which its decent, whitewashed walls shine modestly forth, like Christian purity beaming through the shades of retirement.
Projecting from the further angle of the room stands a dark-looking den --the bar-- a rude attempt at a right whale's head.
Sometimes, nothing is injured but the man who is thus annihilated; oftener the boat's bow is knocked off, or the thigh-board, in which the headsman stands, is torn from its place and accompanies the body.
In the center stands the bride, and, one by one, the men step into the enclosure and dance with her.
Now, yer see, when a feller stands up for a thing one day and night, de contrar de next, folks ses (and nat'rally enough dey ses), why he an't persistent,--hand me dat ar bit o' corn-cake, Andy.