starch


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Related to starch: glycogen

starch

 (stärch)
n.
1. A naturally abundant nutrient carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, found chiefly in the seeds, fruits, tubers, roots, and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice, and varying widely in appearance according to source but commonly prepared as a white amorphous tasteless powder.
2. Any of various substances, such as natural starch, used to stiffen cloth, as in laundering.
3. starches Foods having a high content of starch, as rice, breads, and potatoes.
4.
a. Stiff behavior: "Dobbs, the butler ... isn't as stiff as he used to be; Ann, my brother's new wife, has loosened up his starch a bit" (Jennifer St. Giles).
b. Vigor; mettle: "Business travel can take the starch out of the most self-assured corporate titan" (Lisa Faye Kaplan).
tr.v. starched, starch·ing, starch·es
To stiffen with starch.

[Middle English starche, substance used to stiffen cloth (sense uncertain), from sterchen, to stiffen, from Old English *stercan; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

starch

(stɑːtʃ)
n
1. (Biochemistry) a polysaccharide composed of glucose units that occurs widely in plant tissues in the form of storage granules, consisting of amylose and amylopectin.
2. (Biochemistry) Also called: amylum a starch obtained from potatoes and some grain: it is fine white powder that forms a translucent viscous solution on boiling with water and is used to stiffen fabric and in many industrial processes
3. (Cookery) any food containing a large amount of starch, such as rice and potatoes
4. stiff or pompous formality of manner or conduct
vb
(Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to stiffen with or soak in starch
adj
(of a person) formal; stiff
[Old English stercan (unattested except by the past participle sterced) to stiffen; related to Old Saxon sterkian, Old High German sterken to strengthen, Dutch sterken; see stark]
ˈstarcher n
ˈstarchˌlike adj

starch

(stɑrtʃ)

n.
1. a white, tasteless, solid carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, occurring in the form of minute granules in the seeds, tubers, and other parts of plants, and forming an important constituent of rice, corn, wheat, beans, potatoes, and many other vegetable foods.
2. a commercial preparation of this substance used to stiffen textile fabrics in laundering.
3. starches, foods rich in natural starch.
4. stiffness or formality, as of manner.
5. vigor; energy; stamina; boldness.
v.t.
6. to stiffen or treat with starch.
7. to make stiff or rigidly formal (sometimes fol. by up).
[1375–1425; (v.) late Middle English sterchen orig., to stiffen, Old English stercean to strengthen, derivative of stearc stark; (n.) late Middle English starch(e), sterche, derivative of the v.]

starch

(stärch)
1. A carbohydrate that is the chief form of stored energy in plants, especially wheat, corn, rice, and potatoes. Starch is a kind of polysaccharide and forms a white, tasteless powder when purified. It is an important source of nutrition and is also used to make adhesives, paper, and textiles.
2. Any of various substances, including natural starch, used to stiffen fabrics.

starch


Past participle: starched
Gerund: starching

Imperative
starch
starch
Present
I starch
you starch
he/she/it starches
we starch
you starch
they starch
Preterite
I starched
you starched
he/she/it starched
we starched
you starched
they starched
Present Continuous
I am starching
you are starching
he/she/it is starching
we are starching
you are starching
they are starching
Present Perfect
I have starched
you have starched
he/she/it has starched
we have starched
you have starched
they have starched
Past Continuous
I was starching
you were starching
he/she/it was starching
we were starching
you were starching
they were starching
Past Perfect
I had starched
you had starched
he/she/it had starched
we had starched
you had starched
they had starched
Future
I will starch
you will starch
he/she/it will starch
we will starch
you will starch
they will starch
Future Perfect
I will have starched
you will have starched
he/she/it will have starched
we will have starched
you will have starched
they will have starched
Future Continuous
I will be starching
you will be starching
he/she/it will be starching
we will be starching
you will be starching
they will be starching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been starching
you have been starching
he/she/it has been starching
we have been starching
you have been starching
they have been starching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been starching
you will have been starching
he/she/it will have been starching
we will have been starching
you will have been starching
they will have been starching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been starching
you had been starching
he/she/it had been starching
we had been starching
you had been starching
they had been starching
Conditional
I would starch
you would starch
he/she/it would starch
we would starch
you would starch
they would starch
Past Conditional
I would have starched
you would have starched
he/she/it would have starched
we would have starched
you would have starched
they would have starched

starch

Carbohydrate from cereals and potatoes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.starch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and ricestarch - a complex carbohydrate found chiefly in seeds, fruits, tubers, roots and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice; an important foodstuff and used otherwise especially in adhesives and as fillers and stiffeners for paper and textiles
arum - starch resembling sago that is obtained from cuckoopint root
cassava, cassava starch, manioc, manioca - a starch made by leaching and drying the root of the cassava plant; the source of tapioca; a staple food in the tropics
polyose, polysaccharide - any of a class of carbohydrates whose molecules contain chains of monosaccharide molecules
arrowroot - a nutritive starch obtained from the root of the arrowroot plant
cornflour, cornstarch - starch prepared from the grains of corn; used in cooking as a thickener
sago - powdery starch from certain sago palms; used in Asia as a food thickener and textile stiffener
amyloid - a non-nitrogenous food substance consisting chiefly of starch; any substance resembling starch
Otaheite arrowroot, Otaheite arrowroot starch - a starch obtained from the root of the pia
2.starch - a commercial preparation of starch that is used to stiffen textile fabrics in laundering
formulation, preparation - a substance prepared according to a formula; "the physician prescribed a commercial preparation of the medicine"
Verb1.starch - stiffen with starch; "starch clothes"
stiffen - make stiff or stiffer; "Stiffen the cream by adding gelatine"

starch

noun
Related words
adjective amylaceous

starch

noun
A quality of active mental and physical forcefulness:
Informal: snap.
verb
To make stiff or stiffer:
Translations
نَشاءنَشاء الثِّيابيُنَشّي الثِّيابنشاء
škrobškrobit
stivelsestive
tärkkelystärkkijäykkäjäykkyystärkätä
škrob
keményítőkikeményít
mjölvi, sterkjastífastífelsi
澱粉
전분
krakmolaskrakmolingumaskrakmolytaskrakmolytiturintis krakmolo
cietecietinātstērķelestērķelēt
skrobiasztywnośćkrochmalkrochmalić
škrobškrobiť
škrob
stärkelse
แป้ง
nişastakolakolalamak
tinh bột

starch

[stɑːtʃ]
A. N (for clothes etc) → almidón m; (in food) → fécula f
B. VTalmidonar

starch

[ˈstɑːrtʃ] n
(in potatoes, rice, flour, bread)amidon m
(for stiffening cloth)amidon m

starch

nStärke f; low in starchstärkearm
vtstärken

starch

[stɑːtʃ]
1. namido
2. vtinamidare

starch

(staːtʃ) noun
1. a white food substance found especially in flour, potatoes etc. Bread contains starch.
2. a powder prepared from this, used for stiffening clothes.
verb
to stiffen (clothes) with starch.
ˈstarchy adjective
like or containing starch. cake, biscuits and other starchy foods.
ˈstarchiness noun

starch

نَشاء škrob stivelse Stärke άμυλο almidón tärkkelys amidon škrob amido 澱粉 전분 zetmeel stivelse skrobia amido крахмал stärkelse แป้ง nişasta tinh bột 淀粉

starch

n. almidón, fécula, elemento principal de los carbohidratos;
v. almidonar.

starch

n almidón m
References in classic literature ?
I shall row and tramp about, so I don't want any starch to think of.
She made a very grand appearance, having on a high head-dress, a rich gown of velvet, and a ruff done up with the famous yellow starch, of which Anne Turner, her especial friend, had taught her the secret, before this last good lady had been hanged for Sir Thomas Overbury's murder.
Potato flour is the waste of potato after the starch and alcohol have been extracted; it has no more food value than so much wood, and as its use as a food adulterant is a penal offense in Europe, thousands of tons of it are shipped to America every year.
They led Don Quixote into a room, and Sancho removed his armour, leaving him in loose Walloon breeches and chamois-leather doublet, all stained with the rust of his armour; his collar was a falling one of scholastic cut, without starch or lace, his buskins buff-coloured, and his shoes polished.
I tould 'ike a bit o' pum-take," rejoined Totty, who seemed to be provided with several relays of requests; at the same time, taking the opportunity of her momentary leisure to put her fingers into a bowl of starch, and drag it down so as to empty the contents with tolerable completeness on to the ironing sheet.
He often tried, in odd half-hours of conversation to infuse into Newman a little of his own spiritual starch, but Newman's personal texture was too loose to admit of stiffening.
I should like to shake the starch out of some of them, and the dust out of the others.
The young clerk twisted his head round in its vase of starch.
Sir James might not have originated this estimate; but a kind Providence furnishes the limpest personality with a little gunk or starch in the form of tradition.
My mother was a great reader, and with ten minutes to spare before the starch was ready would begin the 'Decline and Fall' - and finish it, too, that winter.
And old Dot-- so to call Dot's father, I forgot it wasn't his right name, but never mind--took liberties, and shook hands at first sight, and seemed to think a cap but so much starch and muslin, and didn't defer himself at all to the Indigo Trade, but said there was no help for it now; and, in Mrs.
It was impossible for anyone to be shy or sober, for such gales of merriment arose they blew the starch out of the stiffest, and made the saddest jolly.