staring


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Related to staring: starring

stare

 (stâr)
v. stared, star·ing, stares
v.intr.
To look directly, fixedly, or vacantly, often with a wide-eyed gaze. See Synonyms at gaze.
v.tr.
To look at directly and fixedly: stared him in the eyes.
n.
An intent gaze.
Phrasal Verb:
stare down
1. To stare at (a person or animal) until that person or animal blinks or turns away.
2. To confront boldly or overcome by direct action: stared down his opponents.
Idiom:
stare in the face
1. To be plainly visible or obvious to (one); force itself on (one's) attention: The money on the table was staring her in the face.
2. To be obvious to (one) though initially overlooked: The explanation had been staring him in the face all along.
3. To be imminent or unavoidable to (one): Bankruptcy now stares us in the face.
4. To be about to experience or undergo (something dire): We are staring bankruptcy in the face.

[Middle English staren, from Old English starian; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

star′er n.

staring

(ˈstɛərɪŋ)
adj
1. gazing curiously
2. having a fixed expression, because of madness, death, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.staring - (used of eyes) open and fixed as if in fear or wonderstaring - (used of eyes) open and fixed as if in fear or wonder; "staring eyes"
opened, open - used of mouth or eyes; "keep your eyes open"; "his mouth slightly opened"
2.staring - without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "utter nonsense"; "the unadulterated truth"
unmitigated - not diminished or moderated in intensity or severity; sometimes used as an intensifier; "unmitigated suffering"; "an unmitigated horror"; "an unmitigated lie"
Translations

staring

[ˈstɛərɪŋ] ADJque mira fijamente, curioso; [eyes] → saltón; (in fear) → lleno de espanto

staring

adjstarrend attr; staring eyesstarrer Blick
References in classic literature ?
The dim, dusty room, with the busts staring down from the tall bookcases, the cozy chairs, the globes, and best of all, the wilderness of books in which she could wander where she liked, made the library a region of bliss to her.
She imagined him turning it slowly about in the white hands and staring at it.
In the evening, as I sat staring at my book, the fervour of his voice stirred through the quantities on the page before me.
He was interrupted by the pressure of Christie's fingers on his arm and a subdued exclamation from Jessie, who was staring down the street.
The child, staring with round eyes at this instance of liberality, wholly unprecedented in his large experience of cent-shops, took the man of gingerbread, and quitted the premises.
Such an interview, perhaps, would have been more terrible than even to meet him as she now did, with the hot mid-day sun burning down upon her face, and lighting up its shame; with the scarlet token of infamy on her breast; with the sin-born infant in her arms; with a whole people, drawn forth as to a festival, staring at the features that should have been seen only in the quiet gleam of the fireside, in the happy shadow of a home, or beneath a matronly veil at church.
I pay this particular compliment to Queequeg, because he treated me with so much civility and consideration, while I was guilty of great rudeness; staring at him from the bed, and watching all his toilette motions; for the time my curiosity getting the better of my breeding.
There were new white cotton gloves upon her hands, and as she stood staring about her she twisted them together feverishly.
There's a dim half-memory of being lifted up to the gangway, and of a big red countenance covered with freckles and surrounded with red hair staring at me over the bulwarks.
Most of them were staring quietly at the big tablelike end of the cylinder, which was still as Ogilvy and Henderson had left it.
If I suddenly asked him what he wanted, he would make me no answer, but continue staring at me persistently for some seconds, then, with a peculiar compression of his lips and a most significant air, deliberately turn round and deliberately go back to his room.
The men, staring intently, began to wait for some of the distant walls of smoke to move and dis- close to them the scene.