starts


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Related to starts: housing starts

start

 (stärt)
v. start·ed, start·ing, starts
v.intr.
1.
a. To begin a movement, activity, or undertaking: She started to dance. The dog started barking. Once we start in, we'll get a feel for the project.
b. To move on the initial part of a journey: They started for the summit.
2.
a. To have a beginning; commence: The movie starts at nine.
b. To come quickly into view, life, or activity; spring forth: The boy's tears started when the balloon popped.
c. To have as an initial part or job: I started as an assistant.
3. To move one's body or a part of it suddenly or involuntarily: started at the loud noise.
4. Sports To be in the initial lineup of a game or race.
5. To protrude or bulge: eyes that fairly started from their sockets in fear.
6. To become loosened or disengaged.
v.tr.
1.
a. To take the first step in doing: We start work at dawn. See Synonyms at begin.
b. To cause to come into being; make happen or originate: Bad wiring started the fire. The website started the rumor.
c. To set into motion, operation, or activity: start an engine; a shot that started the race.
2. To begin to attend: start school.
3. To cause (someone) to have an initial position or role: The manager started him in marketing.
4. Sports
a. To play in the initial lineup of (a game).
b. To put (a player) into the initial lineup of a game.
c. To enter (a participant) into a race or game.
5. To found; establish: start a business.
6. To tend in an early stage of development: start seedlings.
7. To rouse (game) from its hiding place or lair; flush.
8. To cause to become displaced or loosened.
n.
1.
a. An act of beginning; an initial effort: I made a start on keeping a journal.
b. The beginning of a new construction project: an application for a building start.
c. A result of an initial effort: What we did may not sound like much, but it's a start.
2. A place or time of beginning: at the start of the decade.
3. Sports
a. A starting line for a race.
b. A signal to begin a race.
c. An instance of beginning a race: a sprinter who improved her start.
d. An instance of being in the starting lineup for a game, especially as a pitcher: In five starts, he has three wins.
4. A startled reaction or movement.
5. A part that has become dislocated or loosened.
6. A position of advantage over others, as in a race or an endeavor; a lead: Our rivals have a three-month start in research.
7. An opportunity granted to pursue a career or course of action.
Idioms:
start a family
To conceive or have a first child.
start in on
1. To begin an activity regarding (something): start in on a new book.
2. To begin to criticize or complain about (someone or something).
start something Informal
To cause trouble.
to start with
1. At the beginning; initially.
2. In any case.

[Middle English sterten, to move or leap suddenly, from Old English *styrtan; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

starts

  • ptarmic - Describing a substance that starts a sneezing bout.
  • early adopter - A person who starts using a technology or product as soon as it becomes available.
  • prolepsis - Anticipation before something starts is prolepsis.
  • start from scratch - Comes from giving handicaps to some competitors in racing; a contestant who starts from scratch (a line scratched in the turf or gravel) is the one who has no special advantage.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
His vaunted industry is but a vanity and of no effect, since he never gets home with anything he starts with.
It was impossible to start at so late an hour, and so it was not till next day soon after dawn that he set out.
Three times they were ranged ready to start, but each time some horse thrust itself out of line, and they had to begin again.
So you must take the pen in hand, and start the story.
Circling, as he rose, to the west, he wheeled about and jockeyed and maneuvered for the real start of the race.
Sorry, sport, nothin' doin'," Billy said, again making to start on.
Ah, he knows", we say, as we wish him good-morning, and start off; "wonderful how these old fellows can tell
I'm glad to have a little start of him, anyhow, even if it isn't more than two days.
I suppose the vegetable folk were always afraid to enter this cavern because it is dark; but we have our lanterns to light the way, so I propose that we start out and discover where this tunnel in the mountain leads to.
Thinking that he would see or wind us, and that it would probably start them off again if we tried to get nearer, especially as the ground was rather open, we all aimed at this bull, and at my whispered word, we fired.
Still I was forced to wait for a start, and I wasn't so lucky as to get a start.
If they say, 'Charley, come, let us start for hell,' I will harness the dogs, and snap the whip, and start for hell.