stasimon


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stasimon

(ˈstæsɪˌmɒn)
n
an ode that was sung by the chorus in an ancient Greek tragedy once they were standing in their places in front of the stage
References in classic literature ?
We now come to the quantitative parts the separate parts into which Tragedy is divided namely, Prologue, Episode, Exode, Choric song; this last being divided into Parode and Stasimon.
Of the Choric part the Parode is the first undivided utterance of the Chorus: the Stasimon is a Choric ode without anapaests or trochaic tetrameters: the Commos is a joint lamentation of Chorus and actors.
The first stasimon (432-86) of the play invites comparison of Orestes to Achilles and Perseus--heroic figures who have successfully achieved martial kleos (renown) or completed the sort of defining endeavor that Orestes has only just undertaken.
The first stasimon or choral ode of the Antigone of Sophocles is a celebration of the wonders of mankind and anticipates a comparable passage in Hamlet.
The play itself is riddled with fear from the Chorus's first stasimon onward, and no one feels it more intensely than Oedipus: "O dear Jocasta, I am full of fear" (767).
Flattering the Athenian jurors with his afflatus, Sophocles read aloud the opening stasimon of the yet-unpublished Oedipus at Colonus, including the ode to Athens.
Their topics include Antiope and the quiet life, an experiment in reconstruction from fragments using the lost Phoenissae, weaving women's tales in Ion, the first stasimon of Trojan Women, coins and character in Euripides, myth and iconography in Rhesus, choruses and other surviving tragic bystanders in the plays of Sophocles, the role of Apollo in Aristophanes' Oedipus Tyrannus, whether the wasp's anger is democratic, Telephus at Rome, and Greek tragedy and a New Zealand poet.
And the same character can "come forward" as more than one politician in the same play: in one chorus of Euripides' Cyclops Silenus and his satyrs "are represented as helots under Spartan rule," but Silenus also "polymorphically 'comes forward' as Alcibiades" in the same stasimon (65).
Wohl 1998:114: 'The dynamic of the First Stasimon is collapsed even further.
In the famous stasimon of Antigone the chorus says that man has taught himself the astunomous orgas (vv.
The hiatus between gods and men supposedly initiated by Prometheus has reached the point that in this stasimon the gods have disappeared from the scene.
15) This narrative strategy that makes their choral lyrics especially vivid in the parodos and first two stasima devolves into an intrusion of unbidden internalized voices in the third stasimon and, finally, a series of separate voices in the murder scene.