stating


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state

 (stāt)
n.
1.
a. A condition or mode of being, as with regard to circumstances: The office was in a state of confusion.
b. A condition of being in a stage or form, as of structure, growth, or development: the fetal state.
c. A mental or emotional condition: in a manic state.
d. Informal A condition of excitement or distress: was in a state over going to the prom.
e. Social position or rank.
2. Physics The condition of a physical system with regard to phase, form, composition, or structure: Ice is the solid state of water.
3. Ceremony; pomp: foreign leaders dining in state at the White House.
4.
a. The supreme public power within a sovereign political entity: the state intervening in the economy.
b. The sphere of supreme civil power within a given polity: matters of state.
c. A specific kind of government: the socialist state.
d. A body politic, especially one constituting a nation: the states of Eastern Europe.
e. One of the more or less internally autonomous territorial and political units composing a federation under a sovereign government: the 48 contiguous states of the Union.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a body politic or to an internally autonomous territorial or political unit constituting a federation under one government: a monarch dealing with state matters; the department that handles state security.
2. Owned and operated by a state: state universities.
tr.v. stat·ed, stat·ing, states
To set forth in words; declare.

[Middle English, from Old French estat, from Latin status; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

stat′a·ble, state′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: state, condition, situation, status
These nouns denote the mode of being or form of existence of a person or thing: an old factory in a state of disrepair; a jogger in healthy condition; a police officer responding to a dangerous situation; the uncertain status of the peace negotiations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Supreme Court declined to definitively resolve this issue, stating that it is not necessary to decide whether the Vienna Convention creates individual rights because Sanchez-Llamas and Bustillo are not entitled to relief on their claims.
His letter to colleagues may ring eerily familiar to those who attend today's quarterly meetings of the NMC, stating that the "increase in the number of state departments, each established under different laws and adopting different forms, rules, and regulations, has naturally tended rapidly to increase the labors and consequent expenses of insurance companies.
Blaine's amendment was put on a fast track and altered in committee to include language stating, "no such particular creed or tenets shall be taught" in any tax-supported school.