statutory offense


Also found in: Thesaurus.

statutory offense

n.
A criminal offense declared and defined by statute, especially in contrast to a criminal offense declared and defined by the judiciary.

stat′utory offense′


n.
a wrong punishable under a statute, rather than at common law. Also called statutory crime.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.statutory offense - crimes created by statutes and not by common law
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
sex crime, sex offense, sexual abuse, sexual assault - a statutory offense that provides that it is a crime to knowingly cause another person to engage in an unwanted sexual act by force or threat; "most states have replaced the common law definition of rape with statutes defining sexual assault"
bigamy - the offense of marrying someone while you have a living spouse from whom no valid divorce has occurred
References in periodicals archive ?
First, for those offenders convicted of a statutory offense, in which a 19-year-old has sex with a 13-year-old, it is not necessary in most instances to conduct the highest level of notification.
violative of the same statutory offense, but separated by sufficient
Correspondingly, the culpability of offenders who commit the same statutory offense may vary.
69) Particularly important is the long-accepted role that a sentencing judge's discretion to impose a sentence always has been limited by the maximum provided in the statutory offense of conviction pronounced by the jury.
17) Further, although the crime of robbery has been defined by statute in Florida for over 100 years, Florida courts have traditionally looked to the common law to help define the statutory offense.
In this third situation, there is no dispute that a subsequent prosecution is barred, under Blockburger, unless each statutory offense "requires proof of an additional fact which the other does not.
She seeks to understand the contexts in which the actions and cultural practices of Aboriginal people were prosecuted, whether as crimes as or regulatory or statutory offenses.