stayed


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stay 1

 (stā)
v. stayed, stay·ing, stays
v.intr.
1.
a. To continue to be in a place or condition: stay home; stay calm.
b. To remain or sojourn as a guest or lodger: stayed at a motel.
c. To linger or wait in order to do or experience something: We stayed to watch the final minutes of the game.
2.
a. To continue or persist in an action or activity: stayed with the original plan; stayed in college.
b. To keep up in a race or contest: tried to stay with the lead runner.
3. Games To meet a bet in poker without raising it.
4. Archaic To stop moving or stop doing something.
v.tr.
1. To remain during: stayed the week with my parents; stayed the duration of the game.
2.
a. To stop or restrain; check: Doubt stayed his hand.
b. To suspend by legal order the implementation of (a planned action), especially pending further proceedings: stay a prisoner's execution.
3. To satisfy or appease temporarily: stayed his anger.
4. Archaic To wait for; await: "I will not stay thy questions. Let me go; / Or if thou follow me, do not believe / But I shall do thee mischief in the wood" (Shakespeare).
n.
1. A brief period of residence or visiting.
2. Law
a. The order by which a planned action is stayed.
b. The consequence of such an order.
3. Archaic
a. The act of halting; check.
b. The act of coming to a halt.
Phrasal Verb:
stay up
To remain awake past one's usual bedtime; not go to bed.
Idioms:
stay put
To remain in a fixed or established position.
stay the course
To hold out or persevere to the end of a race or challenge.
stay with (one)
To remain in one's memory; not be forgotten: That kind of compliment stays with you for years.

[Middle English steien, from Old French ester, esteir, from Latin stāre; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: stay1, linger, remain, tarry1, wait
These verbs mean to continue to be in a given place: stayed in bed until noon; lingered at the mall for an entire afternoon; remained on the subway until the very last stop; tarried in the hallway until he was late for class; waited for the movie credits to end before she left the theater.

stay 2

 (stā)
tr.v. stayed, stay·ing, stays
To brace, support, or prop up: The tower is stayed with cables.
n.
1. A support or brace.
2. A strip of bone, plastic, or metal, used to stiffen a garment or part, such as a corset or shirt collar.
3. stays A corset.

[Middle English staien, from Old French estaiier, from estaie, a support, of Germanic origin.]

stay 3

 (stā)
n.
1. Nautical A heavy rope or cable, usually of wire, used as a brace or support for a mast or spar.
2. A rope used to steady, guide, or brace.
tr. & intr.v. stayed, stay·ing, stays Nautical
To put (a ship) on the opposite tack or to come about.

[Middle English, from Old English stæg.]
References in classic literature ?
She stayed till Hannah came to take her home to dinner, but she had no appetite, and could only sit and smile upon everyone in a general state of beatitude.
He never gave my mother any money at all but stayed about until he had spent it all, a little at a time.
We are partly sheltered here, though had we stayed in the cave in spite of "
Once, while he was looking at Antonia, he sighed and told us that if he had stayed at home in Russia perhaps by this time he would have had a pretty daughter of his own to cook and keep house for him.
The rich ornaments of his military attire had indeed been repeatedly handled by different individuals of the tribes with eyes expressing a savage longing to possess the baubles; but before the customary violence could be resorted to, a mandate in the authoritative voice of the large warrior, already mentioned, stayed the uplifted hand, and convinced Heyward that they were to be reserved for some object of particular moment.
He's been here before, but he stayed in the hall; he was so shy.
The grime and sordidness of the House of the Seven Gables seemed to have vanished since her appearance there; the gnawing tooth of the dry-rot was stayed among the old timbers of its skeleton frame; the dust had ceased to settle down so densely, from the antique ceilings, upon the floors and furniture of the rooms below,--or, at any rate, there was a little housewife, as light-footed as the breeze that sweeps a garden walk, gliding hither and thither to brush it all away.