steal


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Related to steal: stealable, steel, bilking

steal

 (stēl)
v. stole (stōl), sto·len (stō′lən), steal·ing, steals
v.tr.
1. To take (the property of another) without right or permission.
2. To present or use (someone else's words or ideas) as one's own.
3. To get or take secretly or artfully: steal a look at a diary; steal the puck from an opponent.
4. To give or enjoy (a kiss) that is unexpected or unnoticed.
5. To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer: The magician's assistant stole the show with her comic antics.
6. Baseball To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a base hit, walk, passed ball, or wild pitch.
v.intr.
1. To steal another's property.
2. To move, happen, or elapse stealthily or unobtrusively: He stole away for a quiet moment. The deadline stole up on us.
3. Baseball To steal a base.
n.
1. The act of stealing.
2. Slang A bargain.
3. Baseball A stolen base.
4. Basketball An act of gaining possession of the ball from an opponent.
Idiom:
steal (someone's) thunder
To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.

[Middle English stelen, from Old English stelan.]

steal′er n.
Synonyms: steal, purloin, filch, pilfer, swipe, lift, pinch
These verbs mean to take another's property wrongfully, often surreptitiously. Steal is the most general: stole a car; steals research from colleagues. To purloin is to make off with something, often in a breach of trust: purloined the key to his cousin's safe-deposit box. Filch often suggests that what is stolen is of little value, while pilfer sometimes connotes theft of or in small quantities: filched towels from the hotel; pilfered fruit from the farmer. Swipe frequently connotes quick, furtive snatching or seizing: swiped a magazine from the rack. To lift is to take something surreptitiously and keep it for oneself: a pickpocket who lifts wallets on the subway. Pinch can apply loosely to any kind of stealing, but literally it means taking something by picking it up between the thumb and the fingers: pinched a dollar from the till.

steal

(stiːl)
vb, steals, stealing, stole or stolen
1. to take (something) from someone, etc without permission or unlawfully, esp in a secret manner
2. (tr) to obtain surreptitiously
3. (tr) to appropriate (ideas, etc) without acknowledgment, as in plagiarism
4. to move or convey stealthily: they stole along the corridor.
5. (intr) to pass unnoticed: the hours stole by.
6. (tr) to win or gain by strategy or luck, as in various sports: to steal a few yards.
7. steal a march on to obtain an advantage over, esp by a secret or underhand measure
8. steal someone's thunder to detract from the attention due to another by forestalling him or her
9. steal the show to be looked upon as the most interesting, popular, etc, esp unexpectedly
n
10. (Law) the act of stealing
11. something stolen or acquired easily or at little cost
[Old English stelan; related to Old Frisian, Old Norse stela Gothic stilan, German stehlen]

steal

(stil)

v. stole, sto•len, steal•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to take (the property of another or others) without permission or right, esp. secretly or by force.
2. to appropriate (ideas, credit, words, etc.) without right or acknowledgment.
3. to take, get, or win insidiously, surreptitiously, subtly, or by chance: He stole my girlfriend.
4. to move, bring, convey, or put secretly or quietly; smuggle: She stole the dog upstairs at bedtime.
5. Baseball. (of a base runner) to reach (a base) safely by running while the ball is being pitched to the player at bat.
v.i.
6. to commit or practice theft.
7. to move, go, or come secretly, quietly, or unobserved: to steal out of a room.
8. to pass, happen, etc., imperceptibly, gently, or gradually: The years steal by.
9. Baseball. (of a base runner) to advance a base by running to it while the ball is being pitched to the player at bat.
n.
10. an act of stealing; theft.
11. the thing stolen.
12. something acquired at a cost far below its real value; bargain.
13. Baseball. the act of advancing a base by stealing.
Idioms:
1. steal a march on, to gain an advantage over, as by stealth.
2. steal someone's thunder,
a. to accept credit for another's work.
b. to detract from another's achievement by some action that anticipates or overshadows it.
3. steal the show,
a. to usurp the credit for something.
b. to be more outstanding than anyone or anything else.
[before 900; Middle English stelen, Old English stelan, c. Old Frisian, Old Norse stela, Old High German stelan, Gothic stilan]
steal′a•ble, adj.
steal′er, n.

steal

  • embezzle - Originally, it simply meant "steal."
  • purloin - Meaning to steal, it is from Latin pur/pro, "forth," and loign, "far."
  • scrounge - First meant to live off or sponge off someone else; it is a variant of scrunge, "steal."
  • snoop - From Dutch snoepen, "eat on the sly," it first meant "steal and eat in a clandestine manner."

rob

steal
1. 'rob'

The verb rob is often used in stories and newspaper reports.

If someone takes something that belongs to you without intending to return it, you can say that they rob you of it.

Pirates boarded the ships and robbed the crew of money and valuables.
The two men were robbed of more than £700.

If something that belongs to you has been stolen, you can say that you have been robbed.

He was robbed on his way home.

If someone takes several things from a building without intending to return them, you say that they rob the building.

He told the police he robbed the bank to buy a car.
2. 'steal'

When someone takes something without intending to return it, you do not say that they 'rob' it. You say that they steal it.

His first offence was stealing a car.
See steal

steal

When someone steals something, they take it without permission and without intending to return it.

He tried to steal a car from the car park.
She was accused of stealing a necklace.

The past tense of steal is stole. The -ed participle is stolen.

Armed raiders stole millions of dollars.
My phone was stolen from my bag.

Be Careful!
When you are speaking about the object that has been stolen, use steal or take. When the object of the verb is a person or a building, use rob.

I had stolen my father's money.
I know who took my watch.
They robbed him and took his laptop.
The gang were accused of robbing a bank.

steal


Past participle: stolen
Gerund: stealing

Imperative
steal
steal
Present
I steal
you steal
he/she/it steals
we steal
you steal
they steal
Preterite
I stole
you stole
he/she/it stole
we stole
you stole
they stole
Present Continuous
I am stealing
you are stealing
he/she/it is stealing
we are stealing
you are stealing
they are stealing
Present Perfect
I have stolen
you have stolen
he/she/it has stolen
we have stolen
you have stolen
they have stolen
Past Continuous
I was stealing
you were stealing
he/she/it was stealing
we were stealing
you were stealing
they were stealing
Past Perfect
I had stolen
you had stolen
he/she/it had stolen
we had stolen
you had stolen
they had stolen
Future
I will steal
you will steal
he/she/it will steal
we will steal
you will steal
they will steal
Future Perfect
I will have stolen
you will have stolen
he/she/it will have stolen
we will have stolen
you will have stolen
they will have stolen
Future Continuous
I will be stealing
you will be stealing
he/she/it will be stealing
we will be stealing
you will be stealing
they will be stealing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stealing
you have been stealing
he/she/it has been stealing
we have been stealing
you have been stealing
they have been stealing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stealing
you will have been stealing
he/she/it will have been stealing
we will have been stealing
you will have been stealing
they will have been stealing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stealing
you had been stealing
he/she/it had been stealing
we had been stealing
you had been stealing
they had been stealing
Conditional
I would steal
you would steal
he/she/it would steal
we would steal
you would steal
they would steal
Past Conditional
I would have stolen
you would have stolen
he/she/it would have stolen
we would have stolen
you would have stolen
they would have stolen

steal

1. The advance by a runner from one base to another when no hit has been made, usually while the pitcher is pitching.
2. Interception of a pass, or other legal means of gaining possession of the ball from the offense.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steal - an advantageous purchasesteal - an advantageous purchase; "she got a bargain at the auction"; "the stock was a real buy at that price"
purchase - something acquired by purchase
song - a very small sum; "he bought it for a song"
travel bargain - a bargain rate for travellers on commercial routes (usually air routes)
2.steal - a stolen base; an instance in which a base runner advances safely during the delivery of a pitch (without the help of a hit or walk or passed ball or wild pitch)
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
Verb1.steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
cabbage, filch, pilfer, purloin, snarf, swipe, abstract, nobble, pinch, sneak, hook, lift - make off with belongings of others
rustle, lift - take illegally; "rustle cattle"
shoplift - steal in a store
pirate - copy illegally; of published material
plagiarise, plagiarize, lift - take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property
pocket, bag - take unlawfully
defalcate, embezzle, malversate, misappropriate, peculate - appropriate (as property entrusted to one's care) fraudulently to one's own use; "The accountant embezzled thousands of dollars while working for the wealthy family"
rob - take something away by force or without the consent of the owner; "The burglars robbed him of all his money"
cop, glom, snitch, thieve, knock off, hook - take by theft; "Someone snitched my wallet!"
walk off - take without permission; "he walked off with my wife!"; "The thief walked off with my gold watch"
pluck, hustle, roll - sell something to or obtain something from by energetic and especially underhanded activity
loot, plunder - take illegally; of intellectual property; "This writer plundered from famous authors"
burglarise, burglarize, burgle, heist - commit a burglary; enter and rob a dwelling
2.steal - move stealthily; "The ship slipped away in the darkness"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
slip away, sneak away, sneak off, sneak out, steal away - leave furtively and stealthily; "The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard"
3.steal - steal a base
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
gain ground, get ahead, make headway, pull ahead, win, gain, advance - obtain advantages, such as points, etc.; "The home team was gaining ground"; "After defeating the Knicks, the Blazers pulled ahead of the Lakers in the battle for the number-one playoff berth in the Western Conference"

steal

verb
1. take, nick (slang, chiefly Brit.), pinch (informal), lift (informal), trouser (slang), cabbage (Brit. slang), swipe (slang), knock off (slang), half-inch (old-fashioned slang), heist (U.S. slang), embezzle, blag (slang), pilfer, misappropriate, snitch (slang), purloin, filch, prig (Brit. slang), shoplift, thieve, be light-fingered, peculate, walk or make off with People who are drug addicts come in and steal stuff.
2. copy, take, plagiarize, appropriate, pinch (informal), pirate, poach They solved the problem by stealing an idea from nature.
3. sneak, slip, creep, flit, tiptoe, slink, insinuate yourself They can steal away at night and join us.
noun
1. (Informal) bargain, good deal, good value, good buy, snip (informal), giveaway, (cheap) purchase This champagne is a steal.
2. rip-off, theft (slang), thieving, pilfering, misappropriation, purloining, thievery His favourite joke is a steal from Billy Connolly.

steal

verb
1. To take (another's property) without permission:
Informal: lift, swipe.
2. To move silently and furtively:
Slang: gumshoe.
noun
1. The crime of taking someone else's property without consent:
Slang: rip-off.
2. Slang. Something offered or bought at a low price:
Informal: buy, deal.
Translations
استرقيَخْتَلِس، يَسْتَرِق، يأخُذُ غَفْوَةًيَسْرُقيَسْرِقُيَنْسَل بِهُدوء
krástkrást setajně se podívatukrást
stjæle
ŝteli
varastaaryövätä
krastiukrasti
loplopva ránéz
curi
læîaststelastelast til aî gera e-î
盗む盗塁盗塁する忍び足をする掘り出し物
훔치다
daryti slaptadaryti vogčiomisįslinkti
darīt zagšuszagtzagties
fura
krastiukrasti
smygastjälastöld
ลักขโมย
çalmakgizlice yapmakkaçamak yapıvermeksessizce gidivermeksıvışmak
ăn cắp

steal

[stiːl] (stole (pt) (stolen (pp)))
A. VT
1. (= take) [+ object] → robar, hurtar (frm); [+ idea] → robar
to steal sth from sbrobar algo a algn
he stole it from schoollo robó del colegio
she used to steal money from her parentssolía robar dinero a sus padres
she stole her best friend's boyfriend (from her)(le) robó el novio a su mejor amiga
to steal sb's heartrobar el corazón a algn
to steal a march on sbadelantarse a algn
to steal the showllevarse todos los aplausos, acaparar la atención de todos
to steal sb's thundereclipsar a algn
2. (liter) (= sneak)
to steal a glance at sbmirar a algn de soslayo, echar una mirada de soslayo a algn
to steal a kiss from sbrobar un beso a algn
B. VI
1. (= take things) → robar
to steal from sbrobar a algn
2. (= creep)
2.1.
to steal into a roomentrar sigilosamente en una habitación, entrar en una habitación a hurtadillas
to steal out of a roomsalir sigilosamente de una habitación, salir de una habitación a hurtadillas
to steal up/down the stairssubir/bajar sigilosamente las escaleras, subir/bajar las escaleras a hurtadillas
to steal up on sbacercarse a algn sigilosamente
2.2. (fig)
a smile stole across her lipsuna sonrisa se escapó de sus labios
a tear stole down her cheekuna lágrima se deslizó por su mejilla
the light was stealing through the shuttersla luz se filtraba por las contraventanas
C. N (= bargain) it's a steales una ganga or un regalo
steal away VI + ADVescabullirse, irse furtivamente
the intruders stole away into the nightlos intrusos se escabulleron en la noche

steal

[ˈstiːl] [stole] (pt) [stolen] (pp)
vt
[+ object, property, money] → voler
to steal sth from sb → voler qch à qn
[+ ideas] → voler
vi
(= thieve) → voler
(= move silently) → se déplacer à pas de loup
Simon came stealing out of the shadows → Simon sortit de l'ombre à pas de loup.
steal away
steal off vifiler, s'esquiver

steal

vb: pret <stole>, ptp <stolen>
vt object, idea, kiss, heartstehlen; to steal something from somebodyjdm etw stehlen; to steal somebody’s girlfriendjdm die Freundin ausspannen (inf); to steal the showdie Schau stehlen; to steal the limelight from somebodyjdm die Schau stehlen; to steal somebody’s thunderjdm den Wind aus den Segeln nehmen; Labour have stolen the Tories’ clothesLabour hat sich der Politik der Tories bemächtigt; the baby stole all the attentiondas Kind zog die ganze Aufmerksamkeit auf sich; to steal a glance at somebodyverstohlen zu jdm hinschauen
vi
(= thieve)stehlen
(= move quietly etc)sich stehlen, (sich) schleichen; to steal away or offsich weg- or davonstehlen; to steal into a roomsich in ein Zimmer stehlen; to steal up on somebodysich an jdn heranschleichen; old age was stealing up on herdas Alter machte sich allmählich bei ihr bemerkbar; the mood/feeling which was stealing over the countrydie Stimmung, die sich allmählich im Land verbreitete; he could feel happiness stealing over himer fühlte, wie ihn ein Glücksgefühl überkam; to steal home (Baseball) → ungehindert zur Ausgangsbase vorrücken
n (US inf: = bargain) → Geschenk nt (inf); a total stealein echtes Schnäppchen (inf); it’s a steal!das ist (ja) geschenkt! (inf)

steal

[stiːl] (stole (pt) (stolen (pp)))
1. vt (also) (fig) → rubare
to steal money/an idea from sb → rubare denaro/un'idea a qn
to steal a glance at sb → dare un'occhiata furtiva a qn
to steal a march on sb → battere qn sul tempo
2. vi
a. (thieve) → rubare
b. (move quietly) to steal in/outentrare/uscire furtivamente
to steal up on sb → avvicinarsi furtivamente a qn
steal away steal off vi + advsvignarsela, andarsene alla chetichella

steal

(stiːl) past tense stole (stoul) : past participle stolen (ˈstoulən) verb
1. to take (another person's property), especially secretly, without permission or legal right. Thieves broke into the house and stole money and jewellery; He was expelled from the school because he had been stealing (money).
2. to obtain or take (eg a look, a nap etc) quickly or secretly. He stole a glance at her.
3. to move quietly. He stole quietly into the room.

steal

يَسْرِقُ ukrást stjæle stehlen κλέβω hurtar varastaa voler ukrasti rubare 盗む 훔치다 stelen stjele ukraść roubar красть stjäla ลักขโมย çalmak ăn cắp 偷窃
References in classic literature ?
The people held this idol of gold to be their greatest treasure, and they put to death many of other tribes who sought to steal it.
I thought about the friends he had mourned to leave, the trombone-player, the great forest full of game--belonging, as Antonia said, to the `nobles'-- from which she and her mother used to steal wood on moonlight nights.
It may be a minute, or it may be an hour, afore the wily sarpents steal upon us, and it is quite in natur' for them to be lying within hearing at this very moment," said Hawkeye; "but come they will, and in such a fashion as will leave us nothing to hope
They are practised politicians, every man of them, and skilled to adjust those preliminary measures which steal from the people, without its knowledge, the power of choosing its own rulers.
He groped along as stealthily, with as cautious a tread, and as wary an outlook, as a thief entering a chamber where a man lies only half asleep -- or, it may be, broad awake -- with purpose to steal the very treasure which this man guards as the apple of his eye.
If ever I should wish for a retreat whither I might steal from the world and its distractions, and dream quietly away the remnant of a troubled life, I know of none more promising than this little valley.
The devil fetch that harpooneer, thought I, but stop, couldn't I steal a march on him --bolt his door inside, and jump into his bed, not to be wakened by the most violent knockings?
An awe that cannot be named would steal over you as you sat by the side of this waning savage, and saw as strange things in his face, as any beheld who were bystanders when Zoroaster died.
One of them had been stolen long ago, and not a month passed that some one did not try to steal another.
You are very wicked and very foolish," said Miss Ophelia, "to steal your master's money to make yourself a brute with.
If a man who has no property refuses but once to earn nine shillings for the State, he is put in prison for a period unlimited by any law that I know, and determined only by the discretion of those who put him there; but if he should steal ninety times nine shillings from the State, he is soon permitted to go at large again.
I did it; and after a little he had the idea, and he brought his fist down and said HE didn't believe a nation where every man had a vote would voluntarily get down in the mud and dirt in any such way; and that to steal from a nation its will and preference must be a crime and the first of all crimes.