stealing


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steal

 (stēl)
v. stole (stōl), sto·len (stō′lən), steal·ing, steals
v.tr.
1. To take (the property of another) without right or permission.
2. To present or use (someone else's words or ideas) as one's own.
3. To get or take secretly or artfully: steal a look at a diary; steal the puck from an opponent.
4. To give or enjoy (a kiss) that is unexpected or unnoticed.
5. To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer: The magician's assistant stole the show with her comic antics.
6. Baseball To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a base hit, walk, passed ball, or wild pitch.
v.intr.
1. To steal another's property.
2. To move, happen, or elapse stealthily or unobtrusively: He stole away for a quiet moment. The deadline stole up on us.
3. Baseball To steal a base.
n.
1. The act of stealing.
2. Slang A bargain.
3. Baseball A stolen base.
4. Basketball An act of gaining possession of the ball from an opponent.
Idiom:
steal (someone's) thunder
To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator.

[Middle English stelen, from Old English stelan.]

steal′er n.
Synonyms: steal, purloin, filch, pilfer, swipe, lift, pinch
These verbs mean to take another's property wrongfully, often surreptitiously. Steal is the most general: stole a car; steals research from colleagues. To purloin is to make off with something, often in a breach of trust: purloined the key to his cousin's safe-deposit box. Filch often suggests that what is stolen is of little value, while pilfer sometimes connotes theft of or in small quantities: filched towels from the hotel; pilfered fruit from the farmer. Swipe frequently connotes quick, furtive snatching or seizing: swiped a magazine from the rack. To lift is to take something surreptitiously and keep it for oneself: a pickpocket who lifts wallets on the subway. Pinch can apply loosely to any kind of stealing, but literally it means taking something by picking it up between the thumb and the fingers: pinched a dollar from the till.

stealing

(ˈstiːlɪŋ)
n
thieving
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stealing - the act of taking something from someone unlawfullystealing - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
breach of trust with fraudulent intent - larceny after trust rather than after unlawful taking
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
embezzlement, misappropriation, peculation, misapplication, defalcation - the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
pilferage - the act of stealing small amounts or small articles
shoplifting, shrinkage - the act of stealing goods that are on display in a store; "shrinkage is the retail trade's euphemism for shoplifting"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
biopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
grand larceny, grand theft - larceny of property having a value greater than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
petit larceny, petty, petty larceny - larceny of property having a value less than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
skimming - failure to declare income in order to avoid paying taxes on it
rustling - the stealing of cattle
2.stealing - avoiding detection by moving carefullystealing - avoiding detection by moving carefully
concealing, hiding, concealment - the activity of keeping something secret

stealing

Related words
like kleptomania
fear kleptophobia
Translations

stealing

[ˈstiːlɪŋ] Nrobo m, hurto m (frm)
there have been cases of stealingha habido casos de robo or (frm) hurto
stealing is wrongrobar or (frm) hurtar está mal

stealing

[ˈstiːlɪŋ] nfurto
References in classic literature ?
Boxtel at first entertained an idea of stealing the key, but it soon occurred to him, not only that it would be exceedingly difficult to abstract it from her pocket, but also that, when she perceived her loss, she would not leave her room until the lock was changed, and then Boxtel's first theft would be useless.
4) In the Homeric "Hymn to Hermes" Battus almost disappears from the story, and a somewhat different account of the stealing of the cattle is given.
They tried to argue it away by reminding conscience that they had purloined sweetmeats and apples scores of times; but conscience was not to be appeased by such thin plausibilities; it seemed to them, in the end, that there was no getting around the stubborn fact that taking sweetmeats was only "hooking," while taking bacon and hams and such valuables was plain simple stealing -- and there was a command against that in the Bible.
He thought that she had come to Castra Regis again for the opportunity of stealing something, and was determined that on this occasion the chance of pressing his advantage over her should not pass.
I called it borrowing, because that was what pap always called it; but Tom said it warn't borrowing, it was stealing.
I'll pitch this can at your eye if you talk o' my stealing your money.
Considering each of these time periods will help to explain why stolen bases increased so dramatically during the 1970s and will underscore how substantial the shift towards stealing bases became during that decade.
This man is accused of stealing items worth PS25, including a joint of meat, from Iceland Foods, in High Street, Stockton, between 4.
LINDLEY: July 20 BMW 330 was entered by unknown means and a search was made but nothing was taken; July 24 suspect arrested after grabbing hold of woman and stealing her purse and shopping.
They must have been in a hurry, stealing everything they could,'' he said.
Although stealing for scrap value is not new, with the record-high secondary commodity prices, incidents of theft have become more rampant.
While stealing thousands of credit cards and reaping millions of dollars worth of currency, some thieves appeared repeatedly in the same casinos.