steamboat


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steam·boat

 (stēm′bōt′)
n.
A boat powered by a steam engine driving one or more propellers or paddle wheels.

steamboat

(ˈstiːmˌbəʊt)
n
(Nautical Terms) a boat powered by a steam-engine

steam•boat

(ˈstimˌboʊt)

n.
a steam-driven vessel, esp. a small one or one used on inland waters.
[1775–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steamboat - a boat propelled by a steam enginesteamboat - a boat propelled by a steam engine  
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
showboat - a river steamboat on which theatrical performances could be given (especially on the Mississippi River)
Translations
parníkparní člun
damperdampskib
höyryalus
parobrod
gõzhajó
gufubátur
parobrod
buharlı gemiistimbot

steamboat

[ˈstiːmbəʊt] Nvapor m, buque m de vapor

steamboat

[ˈstiːmbəʊt] n (= steamer) → bateau m à vapeursteam-driven [ˈstiːmdrɪvən] adjà vapeursteamed up adj
[glass, windows] → embué(e)
(= het up) to be steamed up about sth → être énervé(e) par qch
to get steamed up about sth, to get steamed up over sth → s'énerver à propos de qchsteam engine nlocomotive f à vapeur

steamboat

[ˈstiːmˌbəʊt] nnave f a vapore; (small) → vaporetto

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
It seems so perfectly ridiculous," said Jessie, "for us to feel as out of place here as that Pike County servant girl in Sacramento who had never seen a steamboat before; do you know, I quite had a turn the other day at seeing a man on the Stockton wharf in a red shirt, with a rifle on his shoulder.
The young man paused, looked as if he was going to say more, when suddenly the boat stopped, and the company made the usual steamboat rush, to see where they were landing.
It resembled a steamboat explosion on the Mis- sissippi; and during the next fifteen minutes we stood under a steady drizzle of microscopic fragments of knights and hardware and horse-flesh.
One evening on board a Mississippi steamboat, a boy of ten years lay asleep in a berth--a long, slim-legged boy, he was, encased in quite a short shirt; it was the first time he had ever made a trip on a steamboat, and so he was troubled, and scared, and had gone to bed with his head filled with impending snaggings, and explosions, and conflagrations, and sudden death.
I rose up, and there was Jackson's Island, about two mile and a half down stream, heavy timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights.
The scene of this chronicle is the town of Dawson's Landing, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, half a day's journey, per steamboat, below St.
He was eating an apple, and giving a long, melodious whoop, at intervals, followed by a deep-toned ding- dong-dong, ding-dong-dong, for he was personating a steamboat.
No doubt it was in further elaboration of this aphorism that the little steamboat that sailed every other day from Yellowsands to the beckoning shores of France was called "the Mayflower.
The Bell Telephone now took its place with the Telegraph, the Railroad, the Steamboat, the Harvester, and the other necessities of a civilized country.
While you, my Lord Godalming and friend Jonathan go in your so swift little steamboat up the river, and whilst John and Quincey guard the bank where perchance he might be landed, I will take Madam Mina right into the heart of the enemy's country.
It was about two o'clock when my brother, having paid their fares at the gangway, found himself safely aboard the steamboat with his charges.
M'Tulloch, an agent of the American Company, was stationed there with twenty men; two boats of fifteen tons burden were lying here; but at certain seasons of the year a steamboat can come up to the fort.