steamer


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steam·er

 (stē′mər)
n.
1. One that steams.
2. A steamship or steamboat.
3. A vehicle, machine, or engine driven by steam.
4. A container in which something is steamed.

steamer

(ˈstiːmə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a boat or ship driven by steam-engines
2. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: steam box an apparatus for steaming wooden beams and planks to make them pliable for shipbuilding
3. (Cookery) a vessel used to cook food by steam
4. (Team Sports, other than specified) slang Austral a clash of sporting teams characterized by rough play

steam•er

(ˈsti mər)

n.
1. something propelled or operated by steam, as a steamship.
2. one that steams.
3. a device, pot, or container in which something is steamed.
v.i.
5. to travel by steamship.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shellsteamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Mya arenaria, soft-shell clam, long-neck clam, steamer clam, steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
2.steamer - a cooking utensil that can be used to cook food by steaming it
cooking utensil, cookware - a kitchen utensil made of material that does not melt easily; used for cooking
3.steamer - a ship powered by one or more steam enginessteamer - a ship powered by one or more steam engines
paddle steamer, paddle-wheeler - a steam vessel propelled by paddle wheels
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
tramp steamer, tramp - a commercial steamer for hire; one having no regular schedule
4.steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europesteamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
genus Mya, Mya - type genus of the family Myacidae
long-neck clam, soft-shell clam, steamer, steamer clam - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Verb1.steamer - travel by means of steam power; "The ship steamed off into the Pacific"
navigation, pilotage, piloting - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
Translations
باخِرَه
parník
damperdampskib
gufubátur
buharlı gemiistimbot

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] N
1. (Culin) → olla f de estofar
2. (Naut) → vapor m, buque m de vapor

steamer

[ˈstiːmər] n
(= boat) → bateau m à vapeur, vapeur m
(for cooking)cuiseur m à vapeursteam iron nfer m à repasser à vapeur

steamer

n (= ship)Dampfer m; (Cook) → Dampf(koch)topf m

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] n (steamship) → nave f a vapore, piroscafo (Culin) → pentola per cottura a vapore

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
He was on the steamer when I went down to Peru to help the Titus Brothers dig the big tunnel.
Two days later Tiny and her friends, and nearly everyone else in Circle City, started for the Klondike fields on the last steamer that went up the Yukon before it froze for the winter.
Pontellier was up in good time to take the rockaway which was to convey him to the steamer at the wharf.
those tiger yellow creatures of his seemed all steel and whale-bone; like five trip-hammers they rose and fell with regular strokes of strength, which periodically started the boat along the water like a horizontal burst boiler out of a Mississippi steamer.
The bell rung, the steamer whizzed, the engine groaned and coughed, and away swept the boat down the river.
It proved to be a steamboat--for they had begun to run a steamer up the Neckar, for the first time in May.
He found a canoe and paddled down downstream, setting the canoe adrift as dawn approached, and making his way by land to the next village, where he kept out of sight till a transient steamer came along, and then took deck passage for St.
And while the late steamer Big Missouri worked and sweated in the sun, the retired artist sat on a barrel in the shade close by, dangled his legs, munched his apple, and planned the slaughter of more innocents.
Any foreign steamer that fell in our way and would take us up, would do.
A red glare came from an outward-bound steamer that was coaling.
Limmershin, the Winter Wren, told me the tale when he was blown on to the rigging of a steamer going to Japan, and I took him down into my cabin and warmed and fed him for a couple of days till he was fit to fly back to St.
If we had been told to load a herd of cattle on a steamer, our method would have been to hire a Hagenbeck to train the cattle for a couple of years, so that they would know enough to walk aboard of the ship when he gave the signal; but to-day, if we had to ship cattle, we would know enough to make a greased chute and slide them on board in a jiffy.