steamer

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steam·er

 (stē′mər)
n.
1. One that steams.
2. A steamship or steamboat.
3. A vehicle, machine, or engine driven by steam.
4. A container in which something is steamed.

steamer

(ˈstiːmə)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a boat or ship driven by steam-engines
2. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: steam box an apparatus for steaming wooden beams and planks to make them pliable for shipbuilding
3. (Cookery) a vessel used to cook food by steam
4. (Team Sports, other than specified) slang Austral a clash of sporting teams characterized by rough play

steam•er

(ˈsti mər)

n.
1. something propelled or operated by steam, as a steamship.
2. one that steams.
3. a device, pot, or container in which something is steamed.
v.i.
5. to travel by steamship.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shellsteamer - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Mya arenaria, soft-shell clam, long-neck clam, steamer clam, steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - flesh of either hard-shell or soft-shell clams
2.steamer - a cooking utensil that can be used to cook food by steaming it
cooking utensil, cookware - a kitchen utensil made of material that does not melt easily; used for cooking
3.steamer - a ship powered by one or more steam enginessteamer - a ship powered by one or more steam engines
paddle steamer, paddle-wheeler - a steam vessel propelled by paddle wheels
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steam engine - external-combustion engine in which heat is used to raise steam which either turns a turbine or forces a piston to move up and down in a cylinder
tramp steamer, tramp - a commercial steamer for hire; one having no regular schedule
4.steamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europesteamer - an edible clam with thin oval-shaped shell found in coastal regions of the United States and Europe
clam - burrowing marine mollusk living on sand or mud; the shell closes with viselike firmness
genus Mya, Mya - type genus of the family Myacidae
long-neck clam, soft-shell clam, steamer, steamer clam - a clam that is usually steamed in the shell
Verb1.steamer - travel by means of steam power; "The ship steamed off into the Pacific"
navigation, pilotage, piloting - the guidance of ships or airplanes from place to place
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
Translations
باخِرَه
parník
damperdampskib
gufubátur
buharlı gemiistimbot

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] N
1. (Culin) → olla f de estofar
2. (Naut) → vapor m, buque m de vapor

steamer

[ˈstiːmər] n
(= boat) → bateau m à vapeur, vapeur m
(for cooking)cuiseur m à vapeursteam iron nfer m à repasser à vapeur

steamer

n (= ship)Dampfer m; (Cook) → Dampf(koch)topf m

steamer

[ˈstiːməʳ] n (steamship) → nave f a vapore, piroscafo (Culin) → pentola per cottura a vapore

steam

(stiːm) noun
1. a gas or vapour that rises from hot or boiling water or other liquid. Steam rose from the plate of soup / the wet earth in the hot sun; a cloud of steam; (also adjective) A sauna is a type of steam bath.
2. power or energy obtained from this. The machinery is driven by steam; Diesel fuel has replaced steam on the railways; (also adjective) steam power, steam engines.
verb
1. to give out steam. A kettle was steaming on the stove.
2. (of a ship, train etc) to move by means of steam. The ship steamed across the bay.
3. to cook by steam. The pudding should be steamed for four hours.
steam-
steam-driven / steam-powered machinery.
ˈsteamer noun
a steamboat or steamship.
ˈsteamy adjective
of, or full of, steam. the steamy atmosphere of the laundry.
ˈsteamboat, ˈsteamship nouns
a ship driven by steam.
steam engine
a moving engine for pulling a train, or a fixed engine, driven by steam.
steam roller
a type of vehicle driven by steam, with wide and heavy wheels for flattening the surface of newly-made roads etc.
full steam ahead
at the greatest speed possible.
get steamed up
to get very upset or angry.
get up steam
to build up energy ready for effort.
let off steam
1. to release steam into the air.
2. to release or get rid of excess energy, emotion etc. The children were letting off steam by running about in the playground.
run out of steam
to lose energy, or become exhausted.
steam up
to (cause to) become covered with steam. The windows steamed up / became steamed up.
under one's own steam
by one's own efforts, without help from others. John gave me a lift in his car, but Mary arrived under her own steam.
References in classic literature ?
Here, were the Leith, Aberdeen, and Glasgow steamers, loading and unloading goods, and looking immensely high out of the water as we passed alongside; here, were colliers by the score and score, with the coal-whippers plunging off stages on deck, as counterweights to measures of coal swinging up, which were then rattled over the side into barges; here, at her moorings was to-morrow's steamer for Rotterdam, of which we took good notice; and here to-morrow's for Hamburg, under whose bowsprit we crossed.
Other steamers came out to look for her, and ultimately towed her away from the cold edge of the world into a harbour with docks and workshops, where, with many blows of hammers, her pulsating heart of steel was set going again to go forth presently in the renewed pride of its strength, fed on fire and water, breathing black smoke into the air, pulsating, throbbing, shouldering its arrogant way against the great rollers in blind disdain of winds and sea.
Having finished my business, and feeling the lassitude and exhaustion incident to its dispatch, I felt that a protracted sea voyage would be both agreeable and beneficial, so instead of embarking for my return on one of the many fine passenger steamers I booked for New York on the sailing vessel Morrow, upon which I had shipped a large and valuable invoice of the goods I had bought.
But, in order not to exceed it, you must jump mathematically from the trains upon the steamers, and from the steamers upon the trains again.
They had been seen on the Tower Wharf that morning, embarking on board the steamer bound for Rotterdam.
A first-class steamer, to be under his own command, and capable of accommodating at least one hundred and fifty cabin passengers, will be selected, in which will be taken a select company, numbering not more than three-fourths of the ship's capacity.
It was with the greatest difficulty they could get her down to the beach, where presently my brother succeeded in attracting the attention of some men on a paddle steamer from the Thames.
The fellow led her from the place, and together they walked quickly toward the wharf and along it until across the water they saw a small boat just pulling into the shadows of a nearby steamer.
The day following the death of Alexis Paulvitch a youth accompanying his invalid grandmother, boarded a steamer at Dover.
For Daughtry did not care to be seen on such dog-stealing enterprises and was planning how to get on board the steamer unobserved.
The steamer Atlanta from Liverpool put to sea on the 2nd of October, bound for Tampa Town, having on board a Frenchman borne on the list of passengers by the name of Michel Ardan.
A special train from Southampton had just steamed into Waterloo with the passengers from the Royal Mail steamer Ophir.