steed


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steed

 (stēd)
n.
1. A horse, especially a spirited one.
2. An animal used for riding: the use of camels as steeds.
3. Informal A vehicle, especially one that is ridden astride such as a bicycle or motorcycle.

[Middle English stede, from Old English stēda, stallion; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

steed

(stiːd)
n
(Animals) archaic or literary a horse, esp one that is spirited or swift
[Old English stēda stallion; related to German Stute female horse; see stud2]

steed

(stid)

n.
a horse, esp. a high-spirited one.
[before 900; Middle English stēde, Old English stēda stallion; akin to stōd stud2]
steed′like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steed - (literary) a spirited horse for state or warsteed - (literary) a spirited horse for state or war
warhorse - horse used in war
literature - creative writing of recognized artistic value
Translations
جَواد
ganger
fákur
zirgs
tátoš
binek atı

steed

[stiːd] N (liter) → corcel m

steed

[ˈstiːd] n (literary)coursier m

steed

n (liter)Ross nt

steed

[stiːd] n (liter) → corsiero, destriero

steed

(stiːd) noun
an old word for a horse for riding.
References in classic literature ?
The vaquero, who was chasing some cattle, was evidently too preoccupied to heed the shouts of her companion, and wheeling round suddenly to intercept one of the deviating fugitives, permitted Christie's escort to dash past him before that gentleman could rein in his excited steed.
A train of cars was just ready for a start; the locomotive was fretting and fuming, like a steed impatient for a headlong rush; and the bell rang out its hasty peal, so well expressing the brief summons which life vouchsafes to us in its hurried career.
Thus the night fled away, as if it were a winged steed, and he careering on it; morning came, and peeped, blushing, through the curtains; and at last sunrise threw a golden beam into the study, and laid it right across the minister's bedazzled eyes.
He had, in fact, been a favorite steed of his master's, the choleric Van Ripper, who was a furious rider, and had infused, very probably, some of his own spirit into the animal; for, old and broken-down as he looked, there was more of the lurking devil in him than in any young filly in the country.
The helmsman who steered by that tiller in a tempest, felt like the Tartar, when he holds back his fiery steed by clutching its jaw.
In an instant the yards swung round; and as the ship half-wheeled upon her heel, her three firm-seated graceful masts erectly poised upon her long, ribbed hull, seemed as the three Horatii pirouetting on one sufficient steed.
I obeyed him, and walked down to the traveller, by this time struggling himself free of his steed.
The Fiend repli'd not, overcome with rage; But like a proud Steed reind, went hautie on, Chaumping his iron curb: to strive or flie He held it vain; awe from above had quelld His heart, not else dismai'd.
But, Isaac,'' said the Pilgrim, smiling, ``dost thou know that in these sports, the arms and steed of the knight who is unhorsed are forfeit to his victor?
When he recognized Lady Brandon he waved his cap, and when they met he sprang from his inanimate steed, at which the bay horse shied.
A cavalier, mounted on a large steed, might be about ninety feet high.
Feeling very hungry, and supposing that the princess also might be in want of food, he brought his steed down to the earth, and left the princess in a shady place, on the banks of a clear stream.