steelyard

(redirected from steelyards)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
click for a larger image
steelyard

steel·yard

 (stēl′yärd′)
n.
A balance consisting of a scaled arm suspended off center, a hook at the shorter end on which to hang the object being weighed, and a counterbalance at the longer end that can be moved to find the weight.

[steel + yard, rod.]

steelyard

(ˈstiːlˌjɑːd)
n
(General Engineering) a portable balance consisting of a pivoted bar with two unequal arms. The load is suspended from the shorter one and the bar is returned to the horizontal by adding weights to the longer one
[C17: from steel + yard1 (in the archaic sense: a rod or pole)]

steel•yard

(ˈstilˌyɑrd, ˈstɪl yərd)

n.
a portable balance with two unequal arms, the longer one having a movable counterpoise and the shorter one bearing a hook or the like for holding the object to be weighed.
[1630–40; appar. steel + yard1 (in sense “rod”)]

Steelyard

A weighing scale in which the object to be weighed was suspended near the end of the shorter arm of a straight pivoted beam and a light counterbalancing weight (Poise) moved along the longer arm until the beam was balanced. Also, see Cotton scale.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Steelyard - a portable balance consisting of a pivoted bar with arms of unequal lengthsteelyard - a portable balance consisting of a pivoted bar with arms of unequal length
balance - a scale for weighing; depends on pull of gravity
Translations

steelyard

[ˈstiːljɑːd] Nromana f

steelyard

nHandwaage f

steelyard

[ˈstiːlˌjɑːd] nstadera
References in classic literature ?
It is needless to say that a scale would not show this loss; for the weight destined to weight the object would have lost exactly as much as the object itself; but a spring steelyard for example, the tension of which was independent of the attraction, would have given a just estimate of this loss.
The men had good macho jobs, toiling in steelyards or marine salvage, but now they're reduced to menial work, or no work at all; at least one has been "in and out of jail".
When the iron leaves the back door of the steel mill, it is usually in a form that can enter the wholesale trade before it eventually ends up in steelyards and hardware shops where you and I, and hundreds of contractors of various kinds, buy whatever we need, to make a specific product or structure.