steeple


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stee·ple

 (stē′pəl)
n.
1. A tower rising above the roof of a building, such as a church, and usually surmounted by a spire.
2. A spire.

[Middle English stepel, from Old English stēpel.]

steeple

(ˈstiːpəl)
n
1. (Architecture) a tall ornamental tower that forms the superstructure of a church, temple, etc
2. (Architecture) such a tower with the spire above it
3. any spire or pointed structure
[Old English stēpel; see steep1]
ˈsteepled adj

stee•ple

(ˈsti pəl)

n.
1. an ornamental construction, usu. ending in a spire, erected on a roof or tower of a church, public building, etc.
2. a tower terminating in such a construction.
3. a spire.
[before 1000; Old English stēpel tower. See steep1, -le]
stee′pled, adj.
spire, steeple - A spire is the tall pointed roof of a tower or the tall pointed structure on top of a steeple; a steeple is the tower plus the spire.
See also related terms for tower.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steeple - a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the topsteeple - a tall tower that forms the superstructure of a building (usually a church or temple) and that tapers to a point at the top
church service, church - a service conducted in a house of worship; "don't be late for church"
pinnacle - (architecture) a slender upright spire at the top of a buttress of tower
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building

steeple

noun spire, tower, belfry The church had a steeple, a bell tower and a clock.
Translations
الجُزْء العُلوي من بُرْج الكَنيسَهبُرْجُ الكَنِيسَة
kostelní věžvěžička
spir
kirkontorni
zvonik
templomtorony
turn
尖塔
뾰족탑
bėgimas su kliūtimis
smailezvanu tornis
kostolná veža
kyrktorn
ยอดหลังคา
kilise kulesikilise/çan kulesi
ngọn tháp

steeple

[ˈstiːpl] Naguja f, chapitel m

steeple

[ˈstiːpəl] nclocher m

steeple

nKirchturm m

steeple

:
steeplechase
n (for horses) → Jagdrennen nt, → Hindernisrennen nt; (for runners) → Hindernislauf m
steeplechaser
n (= horse)Steepler m; (= jockey)Reiter(in) m(f)in einem Jagdrennen; (= runner)Hindernisläufer(in) m(f)
steeplejack
nTurmarbeiter(in) m(f)

steeple

[ˈstiːpl] ncampanile m

steeple

(ˈstiːpl) noun
a high tower of a church etc, usually having a spire.
ˈsteeplechase noun
a race on horseback or on foot across open country, over hedges etc, or over a course on which obstacles (eg fences, hedges etc) have been made.

steeple

بُرْجُ الكَنِيسَة věžička spir Kirchturm καμπαναριό campanario kirkontorni clocher zvonik campanile 尖塔 뾰족탑 torenspits spir wieża campanário, torre da igreja колокольня kyrktorn ยอดหลังคา kilise kulesi ngọn tháp 尖塔
References in classic literature ?
This derivative, to say the truth, is still countenanced by some traces of the electric fluid evident on the summit of the steeple of the House of the Town-Council.
In their midst the central steeple towers proudly up like the mainmast of some great Indiaman among a fleet of coasters.
I am bringing it from the frownery - the one over there with the gilded steeple.
And the people - ah, the people - They that dwell up in the steeple, All alone, And who, tolling, tolling, tolling, In that muffled monotone, Feel a glory in so rolling On the human heart a stone - They are neither man nor woman - They are neither brute nor human - They are Ghouls: - And their king it is who tolls: - And he rolls, rolls, rolls, rolls, Rolls
Then 'it came into his head, "How if the steeple itself should fall?
High up in the steeple of an old church, far above the light and murmur of the town and far below the flying clouds that shadow it, is the wild and dreary place at night: and high up in the steeple of an old church, dwelt the Chimes I tell of.
From this station, as I pleased myself with imagining, Gage may have beheld his disastrous victory on Bunker Hill (unless one of the tri-mountains intervened), and Howe have marked the approaches of Washington's besieging army; although the buildings since erected in the vicinity have shut out almost every object, save the steeple of the Old South, which seems almost within arm's length.
Look, that where the handsome steeple rises to the heavens.
Signboards, shaken past endurance in their creaking frames, fell crashing on the pavement; old tottering chimneys reeled and staggered in the blast; and many a steeple rocked again that night, as though the earth were troubled.
They go to the university to put a mansard roof on their whole general education; but the German student already has his mansard roof, so he goes there to add a steeple in the nature of some specialty, such as a particular branch of law, or diseases of the eye, or special study of the ancient Gothic tongues.
When the church came to itself - for he was so sudden and strong that he made it go head over heels before me, and I saw the steeple under my feet - when the church came to itself, I say, I was seated on a high tombstone, trembling, while he ate the bread ravenously.
Accordingly one day my nurse carried me thither, but I may truly say I came back disappointed; for the height is not above three thousand feet, reckoning from the ground to the highest pinnacle top; which, allowing for the difference between the size of those people and us in Europe, is no great matter for admiration, nor at all equal in proportion (if I rightly remember) to Salisbury steeple.