steer


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steer 1

 (stîr)
v. steered, steer·ing, steers
v.tr.
1.
a. To guide (a vessel or vehicle), especially by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or wheel: steered the car around the curve.
b. To set and follow (a course): steered a path around the rocks.
2.
a. To direct the course of: steered the business toward record profits. See Synonyms at conduct.
b. To advise or direct (a person) toward a place or course of action: steered the intern toward a career in sales. See Synonyms at guide.
v.intr.
1. To guide a vessel or vehicle.
2. To follow or move in a set course.
3. To admit of being steered or guided: a craft that steers easily.
n.
A piece of advice: The salesman gave me a bum steer on that new car.
Idiom:
steer clear of
To stay away from; avoid.

[Middle English steren, from Old English stēran; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

steer′a·ble adj.
steer′er n.

steer 2

 (stîr)
n.
A young ox, especially one castrated before sexual maturity and raised for beef.

[Middle English, from Old English stēor; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

steer

(stɪə)
vb
1. (Automotive Engineering) to direct the course of (a vehicle or vessel) with a steering wheel, rudder, etc
2. (Nautical Terms) to direct the course of (a vehicle or vessel) with a steering wheel, rudder, etc
3. (tr) to guide with tuition: his teachers steered him through his exams.
4. (tr) to direct the movements or course of (a person, conversation, etc)
5. to pursue (a specified course)
6. (Mechanical Engineering) (intr) (of a vessel, vehicle, etc) to admit of being guided in a specified fashion: this boat does not steer properly.
7. steer clear of to keep away from; shun
n
chiefly US information; guidance (esp in the phrase a bum steer)
[Old English stieran; related to Old Frisian stiūra, Old Norse stӯra, German stevern; see starboard, stern2]
ˈsteerable adj
ˈsteerer n

steer

(stɪə)
n
(Animals) a castrated male ox or bull; bullock
[Old English stēor; related to Old Norse stjōrr, Gothic stiur, Old High German stior, Middle Dutch stēr]

steer1

(stɪər)

v.t.
1. to guide the course of (something in motion) by a rudder, helm, wheel, etc.
2. to follow or pursue (a particular course).
3. to direct the course of; guide.
v.i.
4. to direct the course of a vessel, vehicle, airplane, or the like, by the use of a rudder or other means.
5. to pursue a course of action.
6. (of a vessel, vehicle, airplane, etc.) to be steered or guided in a particular direction or manner.
n.
7. a suggestion about a course of action; tip.
Idioms:
steer clear of, to stay away from purposely; avoid.
[before 900; Middle English steren, Old English stēoran, akin to stēor steering, guidance; c. Old Frisian stiōra, stiūra, Old High German stiuren, Old Norse stȳra to steer, Gothic stiurjan to establish]
steer′a•ble, adj.
steer`a•bil′i•ty, n.

steer2

(stɪər)

n., pl. steers, (esp. collectively) steer.
a male bovine that is castrated before sexual maturity, esp. one raised for beef.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English stēor, c. Middle Low German stēr, Old High German stior, Gothic stiur]

steer

  • coxswain - Originally a servant (swain) whose job it was to steer a boat (cock or cockboat).
  • govern - From Greek kubernan, "to steer."
  • con - To con a ship is to steer it; to con is also "to learn by heart or study attentively."
  • helm - A nautical term meaning "to steer."

steer


Past participle: steered
Gerund: steering

Imperative
steer
steer
Present
I steer
you steer
he/she/it steers
we steer
you steer
they steer
Preterite
I steered
you steered
he/she/it steered
we steered
you steered
they steered
Present Continuous
I am steering
you are steering
he/she/it is steering
we are steering
you are steering
they are steering
Present Perfect
I have steered
you have steered
he/she/it has steered
we have steered
you have steered
they have steered
Past Continuous
I was steering
you were steering
he/she/it was steering
we were steering
you were steering
they were steering
Past Perfect
I had steered
you had steered
he/she/it had steered
we had steered
you had steered
they had steered
Future
I will steer
you will steer
he/she/it will steer
we will steer
you will steer
they will steer
Future Perfect
I will have steered
you will have steered
he/she/it will have steered
we will have steered
you will have steered
they will have steered
Future Continuous
I will be steering
you will be steering
he/she/it will be steering
we will be steering
you will be steering
they will be steering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been steering
you have been steering
he/she/it has been steering
we have been steering
you have been steering
they have been steering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been steering
you will have been steering
he/she/it will have been steering
we will have been steering
you will have been steering
they will have been steering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been steering
you had been steering
he/she/it had been steering
we had been steering
you had been steering
they had been steering
Conditional
I would steer
you would steer
he/she/it would steer
we would steer
you would steer
they would steer
Past Conditional
I would have steered
you would have steered
he/she/it would have steered
we would have steered
you would have steered
they would have steered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steer - an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job"
counseling, counselling, guidance, counsel, direction - something that provides direction or advice as to a decision or course of action
2.steer - castrated bull
male - an animal that produces gametes (spermatozoa) that can fertilize female gametes (ova)
Bos taurus, cattle, cows, kine, oxen - domesticated bovine animals as a group regardless of sex or age; "so many head of cattle"; "wait till the cows come home"; "seven thin and ill-favored kine"- Bible; "a team of oxen"
Verb1.steer - direct the coursesteer - direct the course; determine the direction of travelling
dock - maneuver into a dock; "dock the ships"
sheer - cause to sheer; "She sheered her car around the obstacle"
pull over - steer a vehicle to the side of the road; "The car pulled over when the ambulance approached at high speed"
helm - be at or take the helm of; "helm the ship"
crab - direct (an aircraft) into a crosswind
navigate - direct carefully and safely; "He navigated his way to the altar"
stand out - steer away from shore, of ships
starboard - turn to the right, of helms or rudders
conn - conduct or direct the steering of a ship or plane
navigate, pilot - act as the navigator in a car, plane, or vessel and plan, direct, plot the path and position of the conveyance; "Is anyone volunteering to navigate during the trip?"; "Who was navigating the ship during the accident?"
canalise, canalize, channel - direct the flow of; "channel information towards a broad audience"
tree, corner - force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape
park - maneuver a vehicle into a parking space; "Park the car in front of the library"; "Can you park right here?"
control, command - exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
2.steer - direct (oneself) somewhere; "Steer clear of him"
control, command - exercise authoritative control or power over; "control the budget"; "Command the military forces"
3.steer - be a guiding or motivating force or drive; "The teacher steered the gifted students towards the more challenging courses"
direct - be in charge of

steer

verb
1. drive, control, direct, handle, conduct, pilot, govern, be in the driver's seat What is it like to steer a ship of this size?
2. direct, lead, guide, conduct, escort, usher, show in or out Nick steered them into the nearest seats.
steer clear of something or someone avoid, evade, fight shy of, shun, eschew, circumvent, body-swerve (Scot.), give a wide berth to, sheer off A lot of people steer clear of these sensitive issues.

steer

verb
1. To direct the course of carefully:
2. To show the way to:
3. To control the course of (an activity):
noun
An item of advance or inside information given as a guide to action:
Informal: tip-off.
Translations
ثَوْر مَخْصييُوَجِّه، يَقود السَّفينَه
říditsměrovatvolekvůl
studstyrelede
juhtimakarjatama
ajaahärkäjohdatellajohdattaaohjailla
upravljatiusmjeravati
irányítkormányozterelvezet
stÿra, beinaungnaut
助言去勢雄牛導く操縦する操舵する
guberno
bullēnsstūrētvadītvērsēnsvirzīt
mladý vôl
krmariti
yönetmekiğdiş edilmiş boğakullanmaksürmek

steer

1 [stɪəʳ]
A. VT
1. [+ car, van] → conducir, manejar (LAm); [+ trolley] → llevar, conducir; [+ ship] → gobernar
he steered the wheelbarrow along the garden pathllevó la carretilla por la senda del jardín
to steer one's way through a crowdabrirse paso por entre una multitud
you nearly steered us into that rockpor poco nos llevas contra aquella roca
2. (= lead) [+ person] → dirigir, llevar; [+ conversation etc] → llevar
I steered her across to the barla dirigí hacia el bar
he steered me into a good jobme enchufó para un buen trabajo
B. VI [car] → conducir, manejar (LAm); [ship] → gobernar
who's going to steer? (in car) → ¿quién manejará el volante?; (in boat) → ¿quién manejará el timón?
you steer and I'll pushtú ponte al volante y yo empujo
can you steer?¿sabes gobernar el barco ?
to steer for sthdirigirse hacia algo
to steer clear of sb/sthesquivar a algn/evadir algo
C. N (US) (= tip, advice) to sell sb a bum steerdar información falsa a algn

steer

2 [stɪəʳ] N (= bull) → novillo m

steer

[ˈstɪər]
vt
[+ car] → diriger; [+ boat, plane] → piloter
(= guide) [+ person] (in particular direction)diriger, mener
He steered me to a table and sat me down in a chair → Il me dirigea vers une table et me fit asseoir.
(= lead) [+ person] (towards particular course of action)mener
The new government will steer the country in the right direction → Le nouveau gouvernement mènera le pays dans la bonne direction.
vi
[person] (= steer a boat) → barrer (= steer a car) → conduire
to steer clear of sb → éviter qn
to steer clear of sth → éviter qch
n (= bull) → bœuf m

steer

1
vt (lit, fig)lenken; car also, shipsteuern; person alsolotsen; to steer a steady course (lit, fig)einen geraden Kurs steuern; to steer a course through something (lit, fig)durch etw hindurchsteuern; this car is easy to steerder Wagen lässt sich leicht lenken
vi (in car) → lenken; (in ship) → steuern; to steer due northKurs nach Norden halten; steer left a bitlenken or (in ship) → steuern Sie etwas nach links; to steer for somethingauf etw (acc)zuhalten; (Naut) → etw ansteuern, auf etw (acc)Kurs halten; (fig)auf etw (acc)zusteuern ? clear

steer

2

steer

1 [stɪəʳ]
1. vt
a. (car) → guidare (fig) (conversation, person) → dirigere, condurre; (ship, boat) → dirigere
b. (handle controls of, ship) → governare; (boat) → portare
2. vi (in car) → sterzare; (on ship) → dirigere
to steer towards or for sth → dirigersi verso qc
to steer clear of sb/sth (fig) → tenersi alla larga da qn/qc

steer

2 [stɪəʳ] n (animal) → manzo

steer1

(stiə) noun
a young ox raised to produce beef.

steer2

(stiə) verb
to guide or control the course of (eg a ship, car etc). He steered the car through the narrow streets; I steered out of the harbour; She managed to steer the conversation towards the subject of her birthday.
ˈsteering noun
the equipment or apparatus for steering a ship or car etc. The steering is faulty.
ˈsteering-wheel noun
the wheel in a car for steering it, fixed to the ˈsteering-column, or the wheel on a ship that is turned to control the rudder.
steer clear of
to avoid. I want to steer clear of trouble if possible.
References in classic literature ?
I can well believe two or three of them, attacking a steer or mule at once, could soon weaken it so the animal would die.
He promised to rope a steer for me before sundown next day.
I was also aware that being a green hand at whaling, my own lay would not be very large; but considering that I was used to the sea, could steer a ship, splice a rope, and all that, I made no doubt that from all I had heard I should be offered at least the 275th lay --that is, the 275th part of the clear nett proceeds of the voyage, whatever that might eventually amount to.
Bear in mind, too, that under these untoward circumstances he has to cut many feet deep in the flesh; and in that subterraneous manner, without so much as getting one single peep into the ever-contracting gash thus made, he must skilfully steer clear of all adjacent, interdicted parts, and exactly divide the spine at a critical point hard by its insertion into the skull.
Foreign youth steer clear of the gymnasium; its rules are too severe.
I had remarked on one side of the road, at intervals of six or seven yards, a line of upright stones, continued through the whole length of the barren: these were erected and daubed with lime on purpose to serve as guides in the dark, and also when a fall, like the present, confounded the deep swamps on either hand with the firmer path: but, excepting a dirty dot pointing up here and there, all traces of their existence had vanished: and my companion found it necessary to warn me frequently to steer to the right or left, when I imagined I was following, correctly, the windings of the road.
So the Doctor tumbled out of bed and went to the rudder to steer the ship.
With sheep and shaggy goats the porkers bled, And the proud steer was on the marble spread; With fire prepared, they deal the morsels round, Wine rosy bright the brimming goblets crown'd.
Everybody knowed you was a kind of a chapling, John; but there's others as could hand and steer as well as you," said Israel.
Then if there are any imperfections in the constitutions of states (and that many such exist the diversity of constitutions is alone sufficient to assure us), custom has without doubt materially smoothed their inconveniences, and has even managed to steer altogether clear of, or insensibly corrected a number which sagacity could not have provided against with equal effect; and, in fine, the defects are almost always more tolerable than the change necessary for their removal; in the same manner that highways which wind among mountains, by being much frequented, become gradually so smooth and commodious, that it is much better to follow them than to seek a straighter path by climbing over the tops of rocks and descending to the bottoms of precipices.
Second mate volunteered to steer and watch, and let men snatch a few hours sleep.
To steer this boat to starboard or port, to turn, in a word, following a horizontal plan, I use an ordinary rudder fixed on the back of the stern-post, and with one wheel and some tackle to steer by.