stem


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stem 1

 (stĕm)
n.
1.
a. The main ascending part of a plant; a stalk or trunk.
b. A slender stalk supporting or connecting another plant part, such as a leaf or flower.
c. A banana stalk bearing several bunches of bananas.
2. A connecting or supporting part, especially:
a. The tube of a tobacco pipe.
b. The slender upright support of a wineglass or goblet.
c. The small projecting shaft with an expanded crown by which a watch is wound.
d. The rounded rod in the center of certain locks about which the key fits and is turned.
e. The shaft of a feather or hair.
f. The upright stroke of a typeface or letter.
g. Music The vertical line extending from the head of a note.
3. The main line of descent of a family.
4. Linguistics The main part of a word to which affixes are added.
5. Nautical The curved upright beam at the fore of a vessel into which the hull timbers are scarfed to form the prow.
6. The tubular glass structure mounting the filament or electrodes in an incandescent bulb or vacuum tube.
v. stemmed, stem·ming, stems
v.intr.
To have or take origin or descent: Her success stems mostly from hard work.
v.tr.
1. To remove the stem of: stemmed the apples.
2. To provide with a stem: wine glasses that are stemmed.
3. To make headway against (a tide or current, for example).
Idiom:
from stem to stern
From one end to another.

[Middle English, from Old English stefn, stemn; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: stem1, arise, derive, emanate, flow, issue, originate, proceed, rise, spring
These verbs mean to come forth or come into being: customs that stem from the past; misery that arose from war; rights that derive from citizenship; disapproval that emanated from the teacher; happiness that flows from their friendship; prejudice that issues from fear; a proposal that originated in the Congress; a mistake that proceeded from carelessness; rebellion that rises in the provinces; new industries that spring from technology.

stem 2

 (stĕm)
v. stemmed, stem·ming, stems
v.tr.
1. To stop or stanch (a flow): stemmed the bleeding.
2. To restrain or stop: wanted to stem the growth of government.
3. To plug or tamp (a blast hole, for example).
4. Sports To turn (a ski, usually the uphill ski) by moving the heel outward.
v.intr. Sports
To stem a ski or both skis, as in making a turn.

[Middle English stemmen, from Old Norse stemma.]

stem

(stɛm)
n
1. (Botany) the main axis of a plant, which bears the leaves, axillary buds, and flowers and contains a hollow cylinder of vascular tissue
2. (Botany) any similar subsidiary structure in such plants that bears a flower, fruit, or leaf
3. (Botany) a corresponding structure in algae and fungi
4. any long slender part, such as the hollow part of a tobacco pipe that lies between the bit and the bowl, or the support between the base and the bowl of a wineglass, goblet, etc
5. (Plants) a banana stalk with several bunches attached
6. (Heraldry) the main line of descent or branch of a family
7. (Mechanical Engineering) a round pin in some locks on which a socket in the end of a key fits and about which it rotates
8. (Mechanical Engineering) any projecting feature of a component: a shank or cylindrical pin or rod, such as the pin that carries the winding knob on a watch
9. (Linguistics) linguistics the form of a word that remains after removal of all inflectional affixes; the root of a word, esp as occurring together with a thematic element. Compare root19
10. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the main, usually vertical, stroke of a letter or of a musical note such as a minim
11. (Electrical Engineering) electronics the tubular glass section projecting from the base of a light bulb or electronic valve, on which the filament or electrodes are mounted
12. (Nautical Terms)
a. the main upright timber or structure at the bow of a vessel
b. the very forward end of a vessel (esp in the phrase from stem to stern)
vb, stems, stemming or stemmed
13. (usually foll by: from) to be derived; originate: the instability stems from the war.
14. (Nautical Terms) (tr) to make headway against (a tide, wind, etc)
15. (tr) to remove or disengage the stem or stems from
16. (tr) to supply (something) with a stem or stems
[Old English stemn; related to Old Norse stafn stem of a ship, German Stamm tribe, Gothic stōma basis, Latin stāmen thread]
ˈstemˌlike adj
ˈstemmer n

stem

(stɛm)
vb, stems, stemming or stemmed
1. (tr) to restrain or stop (the flow of something) by or as if by damming up
2. (tr) to pack tightly or stop up
3. (Skiing) skiing to manoeuvre (a ski or skis), as in performing a stem
n
(Skiing) skiing a technique in which the heel of one ski or both skis is forced outwards from the direction of movement in order to slow down or turn
[C15 stemmen, from Old Norse stemma; related to Old Norse stamr blocked, stammering, German stemmen to prop; see stammer]
ˈstemmer n

Stem

(stɛm)
n
(Music, other) die Stem (di) the South African national anthem until 1991, when part of it was incorporated into the current anthem, Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika. See Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika
[C19: from Afrikaans, the call]

stem1

(stɛm)

n., v. stemmed, stem•ming. n.
1. the ascending axis of a plant, whether above or below ground, which ordinarily grows in an opposite direction to the root.
2. the stalk that supports a leaf, flower, or fruit.
3. a stalk of bananas.
4. something resembling or suggesting a leaf or flower stalk.
5. a long, slender part: the stem of a tobacco pipe.
6. the slender, vertical part of a goblet, wineglass, etc., between the bowl and the base.
7. a projection from the rim of a watch, having on its end a knob for winding the watch.
8. the circular rod in some locks about which the key fits and rotates.
9. the stock or line of descent of a family, esp. its original ancestry.
10. the underlying form of a word, consisting of a root alone or a root plus an affix, to which inflectional endings may be added.
11. the vertical line forming part of a musical note.
12. the main or relatively thick stroke of a letter in printing.
v.t.
13. to remove the stem from (a leaf, fruit, etc.).
v.i.
14. to arise or originate (usu. fol. by from).
[before 900; (n.) Middle English; Old English stemn, stefn, akin to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German, Old High German stam stem, Old Saxon, Old Norse stamn stem3]
stem′less, adj.
stem′like`, adj.

stem2

(stɛm)

v. stemmed, stem•ming,
n. v.t.
1. to stop, check, or restrain.
2. to dam up; stop the flow of (a stream, river, or the like).
3. to tamp, plug, or make tight, as a hole or joint.
4. to maneuver (a ski or skis) in executing a stem.
5. to stanch (bleeding).
v.i.
6. to execute a stem.
n.
7. an act or instance whereby a skier pushes the heel of one or both skis outward, as in making certain turns or to slow down.
[1400–50; late Middle English stemmen < Old Norse stemma to dam]

stem4

(stɛm)

n., v. stemmed, stem•ming. n.
1. (at the bow of a vessel) an upright into which the side timbers or plates are jointed.
2. the forward part of a vessel (often opposed to stern).
v.t.
3. to make headway against (a tide, current, gale, etc.).
4. to make progress against (any opposition).
[before 900; continuing Old English stefn, stemn (see stem1); Middle English stampne, stamyn(e) appar. < the c. Old Norse stamn, stafn]

stem

(stĕm)
1. The main, often long or slender part of a plant that usually grows upward above the ground and supports other parts, such as branches and leaves. Some underground plant structures, such as rhizomes and corms, are stems rather than roots.
2. A slender stalk supporting or connecting another plant part, such as a leaf or flower.

stem

- The stem of a tree is etymologically the upright part, the part that "stands" up, from its Germanic base sta-, "stand."
See also related terms for stands.

stem


Past participle: stemmed
Gerund: stemming

Imperative
stem
stem
Present
I stem
you stem
he/she/it stems
we stem
you stem
they stem
Preterite
I stemmed
you stemmed
he/she/it stemmed
we stemmed
you stemmed
they stemmed
Present Continuous
I am stemming
you are stemming
he/she/it is stemming
we are stemming
you are stemming
they are stemming
Present Perfect
I have stemmed
you have stemmed
he/she/it has stemmed
we have stemmed
you have stemmed
they have stemmed
Past Continuous
I was stemming
you were stemming
he/she/it was stemming
we were stemming
you were stemming
they were stemming
Past Perfect
I had stemmed
you had stemmed
he/she/it had stemmed
we had stemmed
you had stemmed
they had stemmed
Future
I will stem
you will stem
he/she/it will stem
we will stem
you will stem
they will stem
Future Perfect
I will have stemmed
you will have stemmed
he/she/it will have stemmed
we will have stemmed
you will have stemmed
they will have stemmed
Future Continuous
I will be stemming
you will be stemming
he/she/it will be stemming
we will be stemming
you will be stemming
they will be stemming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stemming
you have been stemming
he/she/it has been stemming
we have been stemming
you have been stemming
they have been stemming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stemming
you will have been stemming
he/she/it will have been stemming
we will have been stemming
you will have been stemming
they will have been stemming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stemming
you had been stemming
he/she/it had been stemming
we had been stemming
you had been stemming
they had been stemming
Conditional
I would stem
you would stem
he/she/it would stem
we would stem
you would stem
they would stem
Past Conditional
I would have stemmed
you would have stemmed
he/she/it would have stemmed
we would have stemmed
you would have stemmed
they would have stemmed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stem - (linguistics) the form of a word after all affixes are removed; "thematic vowels are part of the stem"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
descriptor, form, signifier, word form - the phonological or orthographic sound or appearance of a word that can be used to describe or identify something; "the inflected forms of a word can be represented by a stem and a list of inflections to be attached"
2.stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
gynophore - the stalk of a pistil that raises it above the receptacle
carpophore - a slender stalk that furnishes an axis for a carpel
corn stalk, cornstalk - the stalk of a corn plant
filament - the stalk of a stamen
funicle, funiculus - the stalk of a plant ovule or seed
petiolule - the stalk of a leaflet
cane - a strong slender often flexible stem as of bamboos, reeds, rattans, or sugar cane
plant organ - a functional and structural unit of a plant or fungus
sporangiophore - stalk bearing one or more sporangia
cutting, slip - a part (sometimes a root or leaf or bud) removed from a plant to propagate a new plant through rooting or grafting
tuber - a fleshy underground stem or root serving for reproductive and food storage
rhizome, rootstalk, rootstock - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structure
axis - the main stem or central part about which plant organs or plant parts such as branches are arranged
caudex - woody stem of palms and tree ferns
internode - a segment of a stem between two nodes
beanstalk - stem of a bean plant
cladode, cladophyll, phylloclad, phylloclade - a flattened stem resembling and functioning as a leaf
receptacle - enlarged tip of a stem that bears the floral parts
caudex, stock - persistent thickened stem of a herbaceous perennial plant
stipe - supporting stalk or stem-like structure especially of a pistil or fern frond or supporting a mushroom cap
flower stalk, scape - erect leafless flower stalk growing directly from the ground as in a tulip
leafstalk, petiole - the slender stem that supports the blade of a leaf
bulb - a modified bud consisting of a thickened globular underground stem serving as a reproductive structure
corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
leaf node, node - (botany) the small swelling that is the part of a plant stem from which one or more leaves emerge
branch - a division of a stem, or secondary stem arising from the main stem of a plant
culm - stem of plants of the Gramineae
halm, haulm - stems of beans and peas and potatoes and grasses collectively as used for thatching and bedding
tree trunk, trunk, bole - the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber
3.stem - cylinder forming a long narrow part of something
anchor, ground tackle - a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving
handgrip, handle, grip, hold - the appendage to an object that is designed to be held in order to use or move it; "he grabbed the hammer by the handle"; "it was an old briefcase but it still had a good grip"
key - metal device shaped in such a way that when it is inserted into the appropriate lock the lock's mechanism can be rotated
nail - a thin pointed piece of metal that is hammered into materials as a fastener
pin - a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
wineglass - a glass that has a stem and in which wine is served
cylinder - a surface generated by rotating a parallel line around a fixed line
4.stem - the tube of a tobacco pipe
pipe, tobacco pipe - a tube with a small bowl at one end; used for smoking tobacco
tube, tubing - conduit consisting of a long hollow object (usually cylindrical) used to hold and conduct objects or liquids or gases
5.stem - front part of a vessel or aircraftstem - front part of a vessel or aircraft; "he pointed the bow of the boat toward the finish line"
front - the side that is seen or that goes first
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
6.stem - a turn made in skiing; the back of one ski is forced outward and the other ski is brought parallel to it
turning, turn - the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right"
Verb1.stem - grow out of, have roots in, originate in; "The increase in the national debt stems from the last war"
originate in - come from
2.stem - cause to point inward; "stem your skis"
orient - cause to point; "Orient the house towards the West"
3.stem - stop the flow of a liquid; "staunch the blood flow"; "stem the tide"
check - arrest the motion (of something) abruptly; "He checked the flow of water by shutting off the main valve"
4.stem - remove the stem from; "for automatic natural language processing, the words must be stemmed"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"

stem

1
noun stalk, branch, trunk, shoot, stock, axis, peduncle He cut the stem for her with his knife and handed her the flower.
stem from something originate from, be caused by, derive from, arise from, flow from, emanate from, develop from, be generated by, be brought about by, be bred by, issue forth from Much of the instability stems from the economic effects of the war.

stem

2
verb stop, hold back, staunch, stay (archaic), check, contain, dam, curb, restrain, bring to a standstill, stanch He was still conscious, trying to stem the bleeding with his right hand.

stem

noun
The main part of a word to which affixes are attached:
verb
Translations
ساقعُنْقمُقَدَّمة السَّفينَهيقْطَع النَّزيفيَنْشأ عَن، يَنْجِم عَن
kmennožkapo celé délcepocházetpramenit
fra for til agterspidsstængelstammestandse
auratajalkakantapolveutuarunko
stafa afstefnistemma, stöîvastilkurstofn, trjábolur; stilkur
シュテム堰止める発端とする
apturētceltieskājiņakātspriekšgals
nôžkarúrkastonka
steblo

stem

1 [stem]
A. N
1. [of plant] → tallo m; [of tree] → tronco m; [of leaf] → pedúnculo m; [of glass] → pie m; [of pipe] → tubo m, cañón m (Mech) → vástago m; [of word] → tema m
2. (Naut) → roda f, tajamar m
from stem to sternde proa a popa
B. VI to stem from sthser el resultado de algo
C. CPD stem cell Ncélula f madre
stem cell research Ninvestigación f con células madre

stem

2 [stem] VT (= check, stop) [+ blood] → restañar; [+ attack, flood] → detener
to stem the tide of eventsdetener el curso de los acontecimientos

stem

[ˈstɛm]
n
[plant] → tige f; [leaf, fruit] → queue f
[glass] → pied m
[pipe] → tuyau m
(GRAMMAR) [word] → racine f
vt (= stop) [+ flow, bleeding] → endiguer
stem from
vt fusprovenir de, découler destem cell ncellule f souchestem-cell research nrecherche f sur les cellules souches

stem

n
(of plant)Stiel m; (of woody plant, shrub)Stamm m; (of grain)Halm m; (fig, of family tree) → Hauptlinie f, → Hauptzweig m
(of glass)Stiel m; (of pipe)Hals m; (Mus: of note) → (Noten)hals m; (in watch) → Welle f; (of thermometer)Röhre f
(of word)Stamm m
(Naut) → Vordersteven m; from stem to sternvon vorne bis achtern
vt (= check, stop)aufhalten; flow of sth, tide, flood, losses, exodus alsoeindämmen; bleeding, decline alsozum Stillstand bringen; inflation also, flow of wordsEinhalt gebieten (+dat)
vi to stem from something (= result from)von etw kommen, von etw herrühren; (= have as origin)aus etw (her)stammen, auf etw (acc)zurückgehen; what does this increase in inflation stem from?welche Ursachen hat diese Zunahme der Inflation?

stem

:
stem cell
n (Biol, Med) → Stammzelle f; stem researchStammzellenforschung f

stem

[stɛm]
1. n (of plant) → gambo, stelo; (of fruit, leaf) → gambo, picciolo; (of glass) → stelo; (of word) → radice f
2. vt (check, stop) → frenare, arrestare; (river) → arginare, contenere; (disease) → contenere
to stem the tide of events → arrestare il corso degli eventi
stem from vi + advderivare da

stem1

(stem) noun
1. the part of a plant that grows upward from the root, or the part from which a leaf, flower or fruit grows; a stalk. Poppies have long, hairy, twisting stems.
2. the narrow part of various objects, eg of a wine-glass between the bowl and the base. the stem of a wine-glass / of a tobacco-pipe.
3. the upright piece of wood or metal at the bow of a ship. As the ship struck the rock, she shook from stem to stern.
verbpast tense, past participle stemmed
(with from) to be caused by. Hate sometimes stems from envy.
-stemmed
a thick-stemmed plant; He smoked a short-stemmed pipe.

stem2

(stem) past tense, past participle stemmed verb
to stop (a flow, eg of blood).

stem

n. tallo, pedúnculo, estructura semejante al tallo de una planta;
brain ______ encefálico;
___ cellcélula madre.
References in classic literature ?
She personified the figure of death and made him now a strong black- haired youth running over hills, now a stem quiet man marked and scarred by the business of living.
I used to love to drift along the pale-yellow cornfields, looking for the damp spots one sometimes found at their edges, where the smartweed soon turned a rich copper colour and the narrow brown leaves hung curled like cocoons about the swollen joints of the stem.
Twenty times they thought the whirling eddies were sweeping them to destruction, when the masterhand of their pilot would bring the bows of the canoe to stem the rapid.
The wharves stretched out towards the centre of the harbor, and, in this inclement weather, were deserted by the ordinary throng of merchants, laborers, and sea-faring men; each wharf a solitude, with the vessels moored stem and stern, along its misty length.
The very law that condemned her -- a giant of stem featured but with vigour to support, as well as to annihilate, in his iron arm -- had held her up through the terrible ordeal of her ignominy.
Though his entire back down to his side fins is of a deep sable, yet a boundary line, distinct as the mark in a ship's hull, called the bright waist, that line streaks him from stem to stern, with two separate colors, black above and white below.
She drove on the dancers--what had once been the ring had now the shape of a pear, with Marija at the stem, pulling one way and pushing the other.
The trader searched the boat from stem to stern, among boxes, bales and barrels, around the machinery, by the chimneys, in vain.
He had finished gouging out a cob, and now he fitted a weed stem to it, loaded it with tobacco, and was pressing a coal to the charge and blowing a cloud of fragrant smoke -- he was in the full bloom of luxurious contentment.
Just a hint of the fall styles, mother," she said, slipping the stem of a gorgeous red and yellow sapling between the mattress and the foot of the bed.
Superstition was with me at that moment; but it was not yet her hour for complete victory: my blood was still warm; the mood of the revolted slave was still bracing me with its bitter vigour; I had to stem a rapid rush of retrospective thought before I quailed to the dismal present.
Once more Miss Garth attempted to stem the man's flow of words.