step by step


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

step

 (stĕp)
n.
1.
a. The single complete movement of raising one foot and putting it down in another spot, as in walking.
b. A manner of walking; a particular gait.
c. A fixed rhythm or pace, as in marching: keep step.
d. The sound of a footstep.
e. A footprint: steps in the mud.
2.
a. The distance traversed by moving one foot ahead of the other.
b. A very short distance: just a step away.
c. steps Course; path: turned her steps toward home.
3. One of a series of rhythmical, patterned movements of the feet used in a dance: diagrammed the basic steps to the mambo.
4.
a. A rest for the foot in ascending or descending.
b. steps Stairs.
c. Something, such as a ledge or an offset, that resembles a step of a stairway.
d. A low platform used for exercise, as in step aerobics.
5.
a. One of a series of actions, processes, or measures taken to achieve a goal.
b. A stage in a process: followed every step in the instructions.
6. A degree in progress or a grade or rank in a scale: a step up in the corporate hierarchy.
7. Music
a. The interval that separates two successive tones of a scale.
b. A degree of a scale.
8. Nautical The block in which the heel of a mast is fixed.
v. stepped, step·ping, steps
v.intr.
1. To put or press the foot: step on the brake.
2. To shift or move slightly by taking a step or two: step back.
3. To walk a short distance to a specified place or in a specified direction: step over to the corner.
4. To move with the feet in a particular manner: step lively.
5. To move into a new situation by or as if by taking a single step: stepping into a life of ease.
6. To treat someone with arrogant indifference: He is always stepping on other people.
v.tr.
1. To put or set (the foot) down: step foot on land.
2. To measure by pacing: step off ten yards.
3. To furnish with steps; make steps in: terraces that are stepped along the hillside.
4. Computers To cause (a computer) to execute a single instruction.
5. Nautical To place (a mast) in its step.
Phrasal Verbs:
step aside
To resign from a post, especially when being replaced.
step down
1. To resign from a high post.
2. To reduce, especially in stages: stepping down the electric power.
step in
1. To enter into an activity or a situation.
2. To intervene.
step out
1. To walk briskly.
2. To go outside for a short time.
3. Informal To go out for a special evening of entertainment.
4. To withdraw; quit.
step up
1. To increase, especially in stages: step up production.
2. To come forward: step up and be counted.
3. To improve one's performance or take on more responsibility, especially at a crucial time.
Idioms:
in step
1. Moving in rhythm.
2. In conformity with one's environment: in step with the times.
out of step
1. Not moving in rhythm: recruits marching out of step.
2. Not in conformity with one's environment: out of step with the times.
step by step
By degrees.
step on it Informal
To go faster; hurry.

[Middle English, from Old English stæpe, stepe.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.step by step - in a gradual mannerstep by step - in a gradual manner; "the snake moved gradually toward its victim"
2.step by step - proceeding in steps; "the voltage was increased stepwise"
Translations
خُطْوَه خُطْوَه
krok za krokem
gradvis
aste-astmelt
askelkerrallaanvähitellen
lépésrõl lépésre
skref fyrir skref
gradatim
pakopa po pakopos
krok za krokom
adım adımyavaş yavaş

step

(step) noun
1. one movement of the foot in walking, running, dancing etc. He took a step forward; walking with hurried steps.
2. the distance covered by this. He moved a step or two nearer; The restaurant is only a step (= a short distance) away.
3. the sound made by someone walking etc. I heard (foot) steps.
4. a particular movement with the feet, eg in dancing. The dance has some complicated steps.
5. a flat surface, or one flat surface in a series, eg on a stair or stepladder, on which to place the feet or foot in moving up or down. A flight of steps led down to the cellar; Mind the step!; She was sitting on the doorstep.
6. a stage in progress, development etc. Mankind made a big step forward with the invention of the wheel; His present job is a step up from his previous one.
7. an action or move (towards accomplishing an aim etc). That would be a foolish/sensible step to take; I shall take steps to prevent this happening again.
verbpast tense, past participle stepped
to make a step, or to walk. He opened the door and stepped out; She stepped briskly along the road.
steps noun plural
a stepladder. May I borrow your steps?
ˈstepladder noun
a ladder with a hinged support at the back and flat steps, not rungs.
ˈstepping-stones noun plural
large stones placed in a shallow stream etc, on which a person can step when crossing.
in/out of step
(of two or more people walking together) with, without the same foot going forward at the same time. to march in step; Keep in step!; He got out of step.
step aside
to move to one side. He stepped aside to let me pass.
step by step
gradually. He improved step by step.
step in
to intervene. The children began to quarrel, and I thought it was time I stepped in.
step out
to walk with a long(er) and (more) energetic stride.
step up
to increase. The firm must step up production.
watch one's step
to be careful, especially over one's own behaviour.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Step by Step male lead dancer (Joel, I think) relies on a wheelchair but once he was on stage all we saw was his obvious and infectious enjoyment of the whole performance.
It teaches us what to say, as we move through the "drama of our redemption step by step.
95) are designed specifically for beginners, and their menus take you step by step through each photo alteration.
National Dance Institute (NDI) is honoring Duke Ellington's 100th birthday with a full curriculum unit on black composers titled Step By Step by Ellington.
WORTHINGTON, Ohio, April 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Step By Step Academy, Inc.