step down


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step

 (stĕp)
n.
1.
a. The single complete movement of raising one foot and putting it down in another spot, as in walking.
b. A manner of walking; a particular gait.
c. A fixed rhythm or pace, as in marching: keep step.
d. The sound of a footstep.
e. A footprint: steps in the mud.
2.
a. The distance traversed by moving one foot ahead of the other.
b. A very short distance: just a step away.
c. steps Course; path: turned her steps toward home.
3. One of a series of rhythmical, patterned movements of the feet used in a dance: diagrammed the basic steps to the mambo.
4.
a. A rest for the foot in ascending or descending.
b. steps Stairs.
c. Something, such as a ledge or an offset, that resembles a step of a stairway.
d. A low platform used for exercise, as in step aerobics.
5.
a. One of a series of actions, processes, or measures taken to achieve a goal.
b. A stage in a process: followed every step in the instructions.
6. A degree in progress or a grade or rank in a scale: a step up in the corporate hierarchy.
7. Music
a. The interval that separates two successive tones of a scale.
b. A degree of a scale.
8. Nautical The block in which the heel of a mast is fixed.
v. stepped, step·ping, steps
v.intr.
1. To put or press the foot: step on the brake.
2. To shift or move slightly by taking a step or two: step back.
3. To walk a short distance to a specified place or in a specified direction: step over to the corner.
4. To move with the feet in a particular manner: step lively.
5. To move into a new situation by or as if by taking a single step: stepping into a life of ease.
6. To treat someone with arrogant indifference: He is always stepping on other people.
v.tr.
1. To put or set (the foot) down: step foot on land.
2. To measure by pacing: step off ten yards.
3. To furnish with steps; make steps in: terraces that are stepped along the hillside.
4. Computers To cause (a computer) to execute a single instruction.
5. Nautical To place (a mast) in its step.
Phrasal Verbs:
step aside
To resign from a post, especially when being replaced.
step down
1. To resign from a high post.
2. To reduce, especially in stages: stepping down the electric power.
step in
1. To enter into an activity or a situation.
2. To intervene.
step out
1. To walk briskly.
2. To go outside for a short time.
3. Informal To go out for a special evening of entertainment.
4. To withdraw; quit.
step up
1. To increase, especially in stages: step up production.
2. To come forward: step up and be counted.
3. To improve one's performance or take on more responsibility, especially at a crucial time.
Idioms:
in step
1. Moving in rhythm.
2. In conformity with one's environment: in step with the times.
out of step
1. Not moving in rhythm: recruits marching out of step.
2. Not in conformity with one's environment: out of step with the times.
step by step
By degrees.
step on it Informal
To go faster; hurry.

[Middle English, from Old English st?pe, stepe.]

step down

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to reduce gradually
2. (intr) to resign or abdicate (from a position)
3. (intr) to assume an inferior or less senior position
adj (prenominal)
4. (Electrical Engineering) (of a transformer) reducing a high voltage applied to the primary winding to a lower voltage on the secondary winding. Compare step up
5. decreasing or falling by stages
n
6. a decrease in quantity or size
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.step down - give up or retire from a position; "The Secretary of the Navy will leave office next month"; "The chairman resigned over the financial scandal"
resign, vacate, renounce, give up - leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily; "She vacated the position when she got pregnant"; "The chairman resigned when he was found to have misappropriated funds"
retire - go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position; "He retired at age 68"
top out - give up one's career just as one becomes very successful; "The financial consultant topped out at age 40 because he was burned out"
pull up stakes, depart, leave - remove oneself from an association with or participation in; "She wants to leave"; "The teenager left home"; "She left her position with the Red Cross"; "He left the Senate after two terms"; "after 20 years with the same company, she pulled up stakes"
fall - lose office or power; "The government fell overnight"; "The Qing Dynasty fell with Sun Yat-sen"
2.step down - reduce the level or intensity or size or scope of; "de-escalate a crisis"
minify, decrease, lessen - make smaller; "He decreased his staff"
Translations

w>step down

vi
(lit)hinabsteigen
(fig) to step down for somebody or in favour of somebodyjdm Platz machen, zu jds Gunsten zurucktreten; he decided to step down and not stand for the presidencyer beschloss, seine Kandidatur fur das Amt des Prasidenten zuruckzuziehen
(= resign)zurucktreten; to step down as president/chairmanvom Amt des Prasidenten/Vorsitzenden zurucktreten
References in classic literature ?
And, perhaps, if the god-driver had an ungovernable desire to step down, put up his flame-colored fists and manfully dispute the right of way, he would have probably been immediately opposed by a scowling mortal with two sets of very hard knuckles.
Be not silent from any mistaken pity and tenderness for him; for, believe me, Hester, though he were to step down from a high place, and stand there beside thee, on thy pedestal of shame, yet better were it so than to hide a guilty heart through life.
And now, you've spoke up free, and I'll take it kind if you'd step down into that there cabin and get me a--well, a--shiver my timbers