step down


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step

 (stĕp)
n.
1.
a. The single complete movement of raising one foot and putting it down in another spot, as in walking.
b. A manner of walking; a particular gait.
c. A fixed rhythm or pace, as in marching: keep step.
d. The sound of a footstep.
e. A footprint: steps in the mud.
2.
a. The distance traversed by moving one foot ahead of the other.
b. A very short distance: just a step away.
c. steps Course; path: turned her steps toward home.
3. One of a series of rhythmical, patterned movements of the feet used in a dance: diagrammed the basic steps to the mambo.
4.
a. A rest for the foot in ascending or descending.
b. steps Stairs.
c. Something, such as a ledge or an offset, that resembles a step of a stairway.
d. A low platform used for exercise, as in step aerobics.
5.
a. One of a series of actions, processes, or measures taken to achieve a goal.
b. A stage in a process: followed every step in the instructions.
6. A degree in progress or a grade or rank in a scale: a step up in the corporate hierarchy.
7. Music
a. The interval that separates two successive tones of a scale.
b. A degree of a scale.
8. Nautical The block in which the heel of a mast is fixed.
v. stepped, step·ping, steps
v.intr.
1. To put or press the foot: step on the brake.
2. To shift or move slightly by taking a step or two: step back.
3. To walk a short distance to a specified place or in a specified direction: step over to the corner.
4. To move with the feet in a particular manner: step lively.
5. To move into a new situation by or as if by taking a single step: stepping into a life of ease.
6. To treat someone with arrogant indifference: He is always stepping on other people.
v.tr.
1. To put or set (the foot) down: step foot on land.
2. To measure by pacing: step off ten yards.
3. To furnish with steps; make steps in: terraces that are stepped along the hillside.
4. Computers To cause (a computer) to execute a single instruction.
5. Nautical To place (a mast) in its step.
Phrasal Verbs:
step aside
To resign from a post, especially when being replaced.
step down
1. To resign from a high post.
2. To reduce, especially in stages: stepping down the electric power.
step in
1. To enter into an activity or a situation.
2. To intervene.
step out
1. To walk briskly.
2. To go outside for a short time.
3. Informal To go out for a special evening of entertainment.
4. To withdraw; quit.
step up
1. To increase, especially in stages: step up production.
2. To come forward: step up and be counted.
3. To improve one's performance or take on more responsibility, especially at a crucial time.
Idioms:
in step
1. Moving in rhythm.
2. In conformity with one's environment: in step with the times.
out of step
1. Not moving in rhythm: recruits marching out of step.
2. Not in conformity with one's environment: out of step with the times.
step by step
By degrees.
step on it Informal
To go faster; hurry.

[Middle English, from Old English stæpe, stepe.]

step down

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to reduce gradually
2. (intr) informal to resign or abdicate (from a position)
3. (intr) informal to assume an inferior or less senior position
adj (prenominal)
4. (Electrical Engineering) (of a transformer) reducing a high voltage applied to the primary winding to a lower voltage on the secondary winding. Compare step up
5. decreasing or falling by stages
n
informal a decrease in quantity or size
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.step down - give up or retire from a position; "The Secretary of the Navy will leave office next month"; "The chairman resigned over the financial scandal"
resign, vacate, renounce, give up - leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily; "She vacated the position when she got pregnant"; "The chairman resigned when he was found to have misappropriated funds"
retire - go into retirement; stop performing one's work or withdraw from one's position; "He retired at age 68"
top out - give up one's career just as one becomes very successful; "The financial consultant topped out at age 40 because he was burned out"
pull up stakes, depart, leave - remove oneself from an association with or participation in; "She wants to leave"; "The teenager left home"; "She left her position with the Red Cross"; "He left the Senate after two terms"; "after 20 years with the same company, she pulled up stakes"
fall - lose office or power; "The government fell overnight"; "The Qing Dynasty fell with Sun Yat-sen"
2.step down - reduce the level or intensity or size or scope of; "de-escalate a crisis"
minify, decrease, lessen - make smaller; "He decreased his staff"

step

noun
1. The act or manner of going on foot:
2. An action calculated to achieve an end:
maneuver, measure (often used in plural), move, procedure, tactic.
3. One of the units in a course, as on an ascending or descending scale:
Informal: notch.
verb
1. To go on foot:
Slang: hoof.
Idiom: foot it.
2. To move rhythmically to music, using patterns of steps or gestures:
Slang: hoof.
phrasal verb
step down
To withdraw from business or active life:
Idioms: call it quits, hang up one's spurs, turn in one's badge.
phrasal verb
step up
To increase the speed of:
Translations

w>step down

vi
(lit)hinabsteigen
(fig) to step down for somebody or in favour of somebodyjdm Platz machen, zu jds Gunsten zurücktreten; he decided to step down and not stand for the presidencyer beschloss, seine Kandidatur für das Amt des Präsidenten zurückzuziehen
(= resign)zurücktreten; to step down as president/chairmanvom Amt des Präsidenten/Vorsitzenden zurücktreten
References in classic literature ?
Besides, now and then such unaccountable odds and ends of strange nations come up from the unknown nooks and ash-holes of the earth to man these floating outlaws of whalers; and the ships themselves often pick up such queer castaway creatures found tossing about the open sea on planks, bits of wreck, oars, whale-boats, canoes, blown-off Japanese junks, and what not; that Beelzebub himself might climb up the side and step down into the cabin to chat with the captain, and it would not create any unsubduable excitement in the forecastle.
And, perhaps, if the god-driver had an ungovernable desire to step down, put up his flame-colored fists and manfully dispute the right of way, he would have probably been immediately opposed by a scowling mortal with two sets of very hard knuckles.
Bartle Massey was getting up to lift the stiff latch of the door for her, but before he could reach it, she had said gently, "Farewell, friend," and was gone, with her light step down the stairs.
To Philip, intoxicated with the beauty of the scene, it seemed that it was the whole world which was spread before him, and he was eager to step down and enjoy it.
She did not know Alan Breck yet, and he was as anxious to step down as Mr.
A, lady--who had fed herself from childhood with the shadowy food of aristocratic reminiscences, and whose religion it was that a lady's hand soils itself irremediably by doing aught for bread,--this born lady, after sixty years of narrowing means, is fain to step down from her pedestal of imaginary rank.
Be not silent from any mistaken pity and tenderness for him; for, believe me, Hester, though he were to step down from a high place, and stand there beside thee, on thy pedestal of shame, yet better were it so than to hide a guilty heart through life.
And now, you've spoke up free, and I'll take it kind if you'd step down into that there cabin and get me a--well, a--shiver my timbers
And, as we bring our characters forward, I will ask leave, as a man and a brother, not only to introduce them, but occasionally to step down from the platform, and talk about them: if they are good and kindly, to love them and shake them by the hand: if they are silly, to laugh at them confidentially in the reader's sleeve: if they are wicked and heartless, to abuse them in the strongest terms which politeness admits of.
Maybe I'd be more genteel inside, and then I wouldn't have to be jumped down and my clothes fly up, but could open the door and step down like a lady passenger.
Then came the young dream of wonders that he might do-- in five years, for example: political writing, political speaking, would get a higher value now public life was going to be wider and more national, and they might give him such distinction that he would not seem to be asking Dorothea to step down to him.
Ask Olson to step down here, please," I requested; "and don't let anyone see you ask him.