steppe


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steppe

 (stĕp)
n.
A vast semiarid grass-covered plain, as found in southeast Europe, Siberia, and central North America.

[German, from Russian step'.]

steppe

(stɛp)
n
(Physical Geography) (often plural) an extensive grassy plain usually without trees. Compare prairie, pampas
[C17: from Old Russian step lowland]

steppe

(stɛp)

n.
1. an extensive plain, esp. one without trees.
2. The Steppes, the vast grasslands in the S and E European and W and SW Asian parts of Russia.
[1665–75; < Russian step' or Ukrainian step]

steppe

(stĕp)
A vast, semiarid, grassy plain, as found in southeast Europe, Siberia, and central North America.

steppe

An extenive flat area of grassland, especially the semiarid plains of eastern Europe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.steppe - extensive plain without trees (associated with eastern Russia and Siberia)steppe - extensive plain without trees (associated with eastern Russia and Siberia)
Russia, Soviet Union, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, USSR - a former communist country in eastern Europe and northern Asia; established in 1922; included Russia and 14 other soviet socialist republics (Ukraine and Byelorussia and others); officially dissolved 31 December 1991
champaign, plain, field - extensive tract of level open land; "they emerged from the woods onto a vast open plain"; "he longed for the fields of his youth"
Translations
سَهْب
step
steppe
stepa
sztyepp
gresja, steppa
stepė
stepe

steppe

[step] N (also steppes) → estepa f

steppe

[ˈstɛp] nsteppe fstepping stone n
(lit)pierre f de gué
(fig)tremplin m
a stepping stone to sth → un tremplin vers qchstep Reebok® nstep® m

steppe

nSteppe f

steppe

[stɛp] nsteppa

steppe

(step) noun
a dry, grassy plain, as in the south-east of Europe and in Asia.
References in classic literature ?
How fine it must be galloping over the steppes on a steppe horse
He could not, any more than a man who has been looking at a tuft of steppe grass through the mist and taking it for a tree can again take it for a tree after he has once recognized it to be a tuft of grass.
In the vast steppe, bathed in sunshine, he could just see, like black specks, the nomads' tents.
They resemble the steppes of Tartary more than any other known portion of Christendom; being, in fact, a vast country, incapable of sustaining a dense population, in the absence of the two great necessaries already named.
Next, having remarked that, though not a master of eloquence, he had always considered that obligations of gentility obliged him to have with me a clear and outspoken explanation, he went on to say that he sought my hand in marriage; that he looked upon it as a duty to restore to me my honour; that he could offer me riches; that, after marriage, he would take me to his country seat in the Steppes, where we would hunt hares; that he intended never to visit St.
But my heart has gone to the Tartar war, To bleak Kansuh and the steppes of snow, Calling my husband back to me.
This region, which resembles one of the immeasurable steppes of Asia, has not inaptly been termed "the great American desert.
Thus, a few days ago, a German geometrician proposed to send a scientific expedition to the steppes of Siberia.
The travellers were now entering one of those great steppes of the Far West, where the prevalent aridity of the atmosphere renders the country unfit for cultivation.
The party had landed on the border of a region that is, even to this day, less known to the inhabitants of the States than the deserts of Arabia, or the steppes of Tartary.
The low shrub oak plateau to which the opposite shore arose stretched away toward the prairies of the West and the steppes of Tartary, affording ample room for all the roving families of men.
They who have been traveling long on the steppes of Tartary say, "On re-entering cultivated lands, the agitation, perplexity, and turmoil of civilization oppressed and suffocated us; the air seemed to fail us, and we felt every moment as if about to die of asphyxia.