stereoacuity


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stereoacuity

(ˌstɛrɪəʊəˈkjuːɪtɪ)
n
the ability of a person to see objects as separate entities along a range of distances
References in periodicals archive ?
In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), compared with age-matched and young healthy control subjects, visual deficits in the following functions were observed: color, stereoacuity, contrast sensitivity, and backward masking (homogeneous and pattern).
The research fits into a larger context where we are training people to increase their stereoacuity," Dr Chopin elaborated.
Test-retest variability of Randot stereoacuity measures gathered in an unselected sample of UK primary school children.
Assessment of central and peripheral fusion and near and distance stereoacuity in intermittent exotropic patients before and after strabismus surgery.
Objective: To determine the prognostic factors affecting stereoacuity in patients with refractive accommodative esotropia (RAE) according to the results of long follow- up period.
Five static parameters were found to be significantly different and abnormal between the mTBI and the visually nondisabled groups: near point of convergence (NPC) break and recovery values were receded, positive fusional vergence (PFV) break and recovery values were reduced, and the stereoacuity threshold was elevated (presumably related to inaccurate vergence) in the group with mTBI [10].
A variety of screening tests are available, including visual acuity, stereoacuity, cover-uncover, Hirschberg light reflex, and auto-refractor tests (automated optical instruments that detect refractive errors).
16) The Screening Test * Sensitivity and specificity in visual acuity tests ranged between 9 and 100% and 8 and 100%, respectively; in auto and photorefractors, between 46 and 95% and 53 and 100%, respectively; in stereoacuity tests, between 14 and 100% and 76 and 99%, respectively.
Studies have examined the effects of the following eye conditions: contrast sensitivity, binocular coordination, stereoacuity, amblyopia, and strabismus.
1998), for example, tested 294 older drivers (age 55-87 years) on a variety of sensory measures (acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereoacuity, visual field sensitivity, and glare) and also assessed of the drivers' functional field of view.
Neither group showed any adverse effects on optical alignment, and both groups performed similarly on binocular and stereoacuity tests.