stereoscope


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stereoscope

ster·e·o·scope

 (stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′, stîr′-)
n.
An optical instrument with two eyepieces used to impart a three-dimensional effect to two photographs of the same scene taken at slightly different angles.

stereoscope

(ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp; ˈstɪər-)
n
(Photography) an optical instrument for viewing two-dimensional pictures and giving them an illusion of depth and relief. It has a binocular eyepiece through which two slightly different pictures of the same object are viewed, one with each eye

ster•e•o•scope

(ˈstɛr i əˌskoʊp, ˈstɪər-)

n.
an optical instrument through which two pictures of the same object, taken from slightly different points of view, are viewed, one by each eye, producing the effect of a single picture of the object, with the appearance of depth or relief.
[1830–40]

ster·e·o·scope

(stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′)
An optical instrument through which two slightly different views of the same scene are presented, one to each eye, giving an illusion of three dimensions.

Stereoscope

A lightweight handheld optical instrument for viewing side-by-side photographs taken with a special camera so that the combined image appeared to be three-dimensional. The two photographs were printed on a card about the size of a postcard.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographsstereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographs
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
Translations

stereoscope

[ˈsterɪəskəʊp] Nestereoscopio m

stereoscope

nStereoskop nt

stereoscope

[ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp] nstereoscopio
References in periodicals archive ?
The parasitoids obtained were identified using a stereoscope (Leica G26, Barrington, New Jersey, USA) and compound microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany), and the keys published by Townes & Townes (1966), Cave (1993), Wharton et al.
All measurements were obtained at 40 X magnification under a Leica MZ8 stereoscope fitted with a SPOT Insight Firewire 2.
It takes the right eye view and the left eye view and create[s] two exposures, and when these two images are placed in the stereoscope they come together and make a 3-D image.
These cards were basically two images of the same scene which would appear in 3D when viewed through a stereoscope.
Though we think of 3D as 21st century technology, 100 years ago there was a craze for three dimensional photographs which could be viewed through a device called a stereoscope.
Specimens were sexed using a dissecting microscope (Fisher Scientific Stereoscope Model 1256214).
Digital Magic is also a specialist in movie digital intermediates, HD mastering, TV commercial productions and stereoscope 3D vision for theme parks.
Visitors to the museum get to learn what a stereoscope or megalethoscope is.
Scientific research on afterimages also resulted in the invention of a host of optical devices, the stereoscope being the most significant, with broad popular appeal as forms of entertainment in Victorian culture (pp.
As creator in 1860 of the hand-held stereoscope, Holmes had provided the public with access to the mass of three-dimensional images that photographers were producing; however, by the time he wrote his piece for the Atlantic, the landscapes and exotic personages so often depicted in these images had been displaced by the Civil War dead.
They link current uses of 3-D technologies to various historical precursors, including medieval religious relics and art, the stereoscope, late nineteenth-century motion studies, Pepper's Ghost, high-frame rate filming, genre, and the phenomenon of franchise filmmaking.
AN early stereoscope card is my selection for this week's Memory Lane.