stereoscope


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stereoscope

ster·e·o·scope

 (stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′, stîr′-)
n.
An optical instrument with two eyepieces used to impart a three-dimensional effect to two photographs of the same scene taken at slightly different angles.

stereoscope

(ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp; ˈstɪər-)
n
(Photography) an optical instrument for viewing two-dimensional pictures and giving them an illusion of depth and relief. It has a binocular eyepiece through which two slightly different pictures of the same object are viewed, one with each eye

ster•e•o•scope

(ˈstɛr i əˌskoʊp, ˈstɪər-)

n.
an optical instrument through which two pictures of the same object, taken from slightly different points of view, are viewed, one by each eye, producing the effect of a single picture of the object, with the appearance of depth or relief.
[1830–40]

ster·e·o·scope

(stĕr′ē-ə-skōp′)
An optical instrument through which two slightly different views of the same scene are presented, one to each eye, giving an illusion of three dimensions.

Stereoscope

A lightweight handheld optical instrument for viewing side-by-side photographs taken with a special camera so that the combined image appeared to be three-dimensional. The two photographs were printed on a card about the size of a postcard.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographsstereoscope - an optical device for viewing stereoscopic photographs
optical device - a device for producing or controlling light
Translations

stereoscope

[ˈsterɪəskəʊp] Nestereoscopio m

stereoscope

nStereoskop nt

stereoscope

[ˈstɛrɪəˌskəʊp] nstereoscopio
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though they're taken from 30,000 feet, these photos are so detailed that when studying them with a stereoscope I can actually tell you the species of individual trees in a given woodlot.
In the last century the stereoscope was envisaged as an analogue for the eye, and thus as the stereoscope was perfected, the human eye operated as the archetype.
This evidently--again, the explanations are tenuous--refers to the way the wooden stereoscope had come to figure as a parlor diversion in the Civil War era, passed from hand to hand to allow 3-D experiences of the Piazza San Marco or the Cathedral of Rouen.
Stereographs--in which double, side-by-side pictures were viewed through a hand-held stereoscope to create a three-dimensional image--were also immensely popular.
Placed side by side under a stereoscope, the images should have merged to form a three-dimensional view of a cliff and steeply sloping valley, with bright areas representing the most jagged regions.
Binocular stereopsis ("two-eyed solid seeing") was discovered in 1833, when Sir Charles Wheatstone invented the mirror stereoscope.
The Wheatstone Award named for inventor Charles Wheatstone, who invented the Stereoscope in 1838 in England, was also a noted advocate and educator about stereoscopic vision and imaging.
The parasitoids obtained were identified using a stereoscope (Leica G26, Barrington, New Jersey, USA) and compound microscope (Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany), and the keys published by Townes & Townes (1966), Cave (1993), Wharton et al.
1838: Sir Charles Wheatstone invents the first stereoscope, which uses two angled mirrors to reflect a separate image into each eye.
A stereoscope which was used to view two card pictures which merged into one image.
Digital Magic is also a specialist in movie digital intermediates, HD mastering, TV commercial productions and stereoscope 3D vision for theme parks.