stern


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stern 1

 (stûrn)
adj. stern·er, stern·est
1. Hard, harsh, or severe in manner or character: a stern disciplinarian. See Synonyms at severe.
2. Showing or expressing displeasure or disapproval; forbidding or harsh: a stern face; a stern voice.
3. Firm or unyielding; uncompromising: stern resistance.
4. Difficult to endure; oppressive: stern necessity.

[Middle English sterne, from Old English styrne; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

stern′ly adv.
stern′ness n.

stern 2

 (stûrn)
n.
1. Nautical The rear part of a ship or boat.
2. A rear part or section.

[Middle English sterne, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse stjōrn, rudder; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

Stern

(stɜːn)
n
(Biography) Isaac. 1920–2001, US concert violinist, born in (what is now) Ukraine

stern

(stɜːn)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the rear or after part of a vessel, opposite the bow or stem
2. the rear part of any object
3. (Zoology) the tail of certain breeds of dog, such as the foxhound or beagle
adj
relating to or located at the stern
[C13: from Old Norse stjōrn steering; see steer1]

Stern

(stɜːn)
n
(Biography) Isaac. 1920–2001, US concert violinist, born in (what is now) Ukraine

stern1

(stɜrn)

adj. -er, -est.
1. firm, strict, or uncompromising: stern discipline.
2. hard, harsh, or severe.
3. rigorous or austere; of an unpleasantly serious character: stern times.
4. grim or forbidding in aspect: a stern face.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English *stierne (in stiernlīce adv.); compare West Saxon styrne]
stern′ly, adv.
stern′ness, n.
syn: stern, severe, harsh mean strict or firm and can be applied to methods, aspects, manners, or facial expressions. stern implies uncompromising, inflexible firmness, and sometimes a forbidding aspect or nature: a stern parent. severe implies strictness and a tendency to discipline others: a severe judge. harsh suggests a great severity and roughness, and cruel, unfeeling treatment of others: a harsh critic.

stern2

(stɜrn)

n.
1. the after part of a vessel (often opposed to stem).
2. the back or rear of anything.
[1250–1300; Middle English sterne, probably < Old Norse stjōrn steering (done aft)]

Stern

(stɜrn)

n.
Isaac, born 1920, U.S. violinist, born in Russia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stern - the rear part of a shipstern - the rear part of a ship    
escutcheon - (nautical) a plate on a ship's stern on which the name is inscribed
back, rear - the side that goes last or is not normally seen; "he wrote the date on the back of the photograph"
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
skeg - a brace that extends from the rear of the keel to support the rudderpost
2.Stern - United States concert violinist (born in Russia in 1920)
Russia, Soviet Union, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, USSR - a former communist country in eastern Europe and northern Asia; established in 1922; included Russia and 14 other soviet socialist republics (Ukraine and Byelorussia and others); officially dissolved 31 December 1991
3.stern - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit onstern - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?"
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
torso, trunk, body - the body excluding the head and neck and limbs; "they moved their arms and legs and bodies"
Adj.1.stern - of a stern or strict bearing or demeanorstern - of a stern or strict bearing or demeanor; forbidding in aspect; "an austere expression"; "a stern face"
nonindulgent, strict - characterized by strictness, severity, or restraint
2.stern - not to be placated or appeased or moved by entreatystern - not to be placated or appeased or moved by entreaty; "grim determination"; "grim necessity"; "Russia's final hour, it seemed, approached with inexorable certainty"; "relentless persecution"; "the stern demands of parenthood"
implacable - incapable of being placated; "an implacable enemy"
3.stern - severe and unremitting in making demands; "an exacting instructor"; "a stern disciplinarian"; "strict standards"
demanding - requiring more than usually expected or thought due; especially great patience and effort and skill; "found the job very demanding"; "a baby can be so demanding"
4.stern - severely simplestern - severely simple; "a stark interior"
plain - not elaborate or elaborated; simple; "plain food"; "stuck to the plain facts"; "a plain blue suit"; "a plain rectangular brick building"

stern

adjective
2. severe, serious, forbidding, steely, flinty Her father was stern and hard to please.
severe warm, friendly, approachable

stern

adjective
Rigorous and unsparing in treating others:
Translations
صارِم، عابِس، قاسٍمُؤَخَّر السَّفينَه
přísnýzáď
agterstævnstreng
ahter
ahteriankaraperä
ridegszigorútatzord
skuturstrangur
bargskuģa pakaļgalsstingrs
korma
mrkosterstrog
akterpopa

stern

1 [stɜːn] ADJ (sterner (compar) (sternest (superl))) [person, look] → severo; [reprimand] → duro
a stern glanceuna mirada severa
a stern warningun serio aviso
he was very stern with mefue muy duro conmigo
but he was made of sterner stuffpero él tenía más carácter

stern

2 [stɜːn] N (Naut) → popa f

stern

[ˈstɜːrn]
adj [person, look, warning, measures] → sévère
n [boat] → arrière m, poupe f

stern

1
n (Naut) → Heck nt; the stern of the shipdas Achterschiff

stern

2
adj (+er) (= strict)streng; words also, character, warningernst; (= tough) testhart; oppositionstark, hart; with a stern facemit strenger Miene; made of sterner stuffaus härterem Holz geschnitzt

stern

1 [stɜːn] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (discipline) → rigido/a; (person, warning) → severo/a
I thought he was made of sterner stuff → pensavo fosse più forte

stern

2 [stɜːn] n (Naut) → poppa

stern1

(stəːn) adjective
harsh, severe or strict. The teacher looked rather stern; stern discipline.
ˈsternly adverb
ˈsternness noun

stern2

(stəːn) noun
the back part of a ship.
References in classic literature ?
In the schoolroom she was silent, cold, and stern, and yet in an odd way very close to her pupils.
With a quick motion of his hand, as he sat in the awning- covered stern with Tom, Ned and the others, Jacinto sent the chunk of meat out into the muddy stream.
Because of her unusual business ability, he was stern and exacting with her.
When, therefore, intelligence was received at the fort which covered the southern termination of the portage between the Hudson and the lakes, that Montcalm had been seen moving up the Champlain, with an army "numerous as the leaves on the trees," its truth was admitted with more of the craven reluctance of fear than with the stern joy that a warrior should feel, in finding an enemy within reach of his blow.
Better in body perhaps--" I began, and stopped short, for he sat up straight and looked at me with such a stern, reproachful look that I could not say another word.
Endowed with commonsense, as massive and hard as blocks of granite, fastened together by stern rigidity of purpose, as with iron clamps, he followed out his original design, probably without so much as imagining an objection to it.
Doubtless, however, either of these stern and black-browed Puritans would have thought it quite a sufficient retribution for his sins that, after so long a lapse of years, the old trunk of the family tree, with so much venerable moss upon it, should have borne, as its topmost bough, an idler like myself.
But the next after that I must have sounded stern enough.
Hiding his canoe, still afloat, among these thickets, with its prow seaward, he sat down in the stern, paddle low in hand; and when the ship was gliding by, like a flash he darted out; gained her side; with one backward dash of his foot capsized and sank his canoe; climbed up the chains; and throwing himself at full length upon the deck, grappled a ringbolt there, and swore not to let it go, though hacked in pieces.
Squaring her yards, she bore down, ranged abeam under the Pequod's lee, and lowered a boat; it soon drew nigh; but, as the side-ladder was being rigged by Starbuck's order to accommodate the visiting captain, the stranger in question waved his hand from his boat's stern in token of that proceeding being entirely unnecessary.
We struck for the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter, for the edge of the skylight was in the water.
He crept down the bank, watching with all his eyes, slipped into the water, swam three or four strokes and climbed into the skiff that did "yawl" duty at the boat's stern.