sterner


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stern 1

 (stûrn)
adj. stern·er, stern·est
1. Hard, harsh, or severe in manner or character: a stern disciplinarian. See Synonyms at severe.
2. Showing or expressing displeasure or disapproval; forbidding or harsh: a stern face; a stern voice.
3. Firm or unyielding; uncompromising: stern resistance.
4. Difficult to endure; oppressive: stern necessity.

[Middle English sterne, from Old English styrne; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

stern′ly adv.
stern′ness n.

stern 2

 (stûrn)
n.
1. Nautical The rear part of a ship or boat.
2. A rear part or section.

[Middle English sterne, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse stjōrn, rudder; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]
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References in classic literature ?
And I believe, in my indignation against myself, I should have put it aside till I had schooled myself into a better frame of mind, and was become more deserving of the honour and privilege of its perusal: but there was my mother looking on, and wishful to know what news it contained; so I read it and delivered it to her, and then went into the schoolroom to attend to the pupils: but amidst the cares of copies and sums--in the intervals of correcting errors here, and reproving derelictions of duty there, I was inwardly taking myself to task with far sterner severity.
He repeated his last words in louder and sterner tones:
Defarge, who had been uneasily biting his thumb-nail and looking at her, collected his face into a sterner expression.
Following my strict orders, I refused his request, mildly at first, in a sterner tone as he insisted with growing impudence.
For two days the wind was contrary, and the vessel was detained in their neighborhood; at length a favorable breeze sprang up, and in a little while the rich groves, green hills, and snowy peaks of those happy islands one after another sank from sight, or melted into the blue distance, and the Tonquin ploughed her course towards the sterner regions of the Pacific.
He would be a harder, sterner man, not so ready to adapt himself to a silly girl's whim.
I had less confidence, but he was the mysterious man whom you ran for in the dead of night (you flung sand at his window to waken him, and if it was only toothache he extracted the tooth through the open window, but when it was something sterner he was with you in the dark square at once, like a man who slept in his topcoat), so I did as he bade me, and not only did she laugh then but again when I put the laugh down, so that though it was really one laugh with a tear in the middle I counted it as two.
Jane Clayton was of sterner stuff than that which bends in spineless terror before danger.
he ordered, and his voice was sterner than any there had ever heard him use.
And even in Socrates himself the sterner judgment of the multitude at times passes into a sort of ironical pity or love.
For a brief time I wandered, in the sweet guiding of love, far from the purpose to which I had been true under sterner discipline and in darker days.
Among the third and fourth year students there was a certain amount of going to and from the trains in couples; some carrying of heavy books up the hill by the sterner sex for their feminine schoolmates, and occasional bursts of silliness on the part of heedless and precocious girls, among whom was Huldah Meserve.