stick around


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stick

 (stĭk)
n.
1. A long slender piece of wood, especially:
a. A branch or stem that has fallen or been cut from a tree or shrub.
b. A piece of wood, such as a tree branch, that is used for fuel, cut for lumber, or shaped for a specific purpose.
c. A wand, staff, baton, or rod.
2. Sports A long thin implement with a blade or net on the end used to propel and control a puck or ball in hockey or lacrosse.
3. A walking stick; a cane.
4. Something that is long and thin: a stick of dynamite; a stick of gum.
5. Slang A marijuana cigarette.
6.
a. The control device of an aircraft that operates the elevators and ailerons.
b. Informal A stick shift.
7. Nautical A mast or a part of a mast.
8.
a. A group of bombs released to fall across an enemy target in a straight row.
b. Slang A group of paratroopers exiting an aircraft in succession.
9. A timber tree.
10. Informal A piece of furniture.
11. A poke, thrust, or stab with a stick or similar object: a stick in the ribs.
12. A threatened penalty: using both a carrot and a stick to keep allies in line.
13. The condition or power of adhering: a glue with plenty of stick.
14. sticks Informal
a. A remote area; backwoods: moved to the sticks.
b. A city or town regarded as dull or unsophisticated.
15. Informal A person regarded as stiff, boring, or spiritless.
16. Obsolete A difficulty or obstacle; a delay.
v. stuck (stŭk), stick·ing, sticks
v.tr.
1.
a. To pierce, puncture, or penetrate with a pointed instrument: stick a fingertip with a pin.
b. To kill by piercing: stick a pig.
2.
a. To thrust or push (a pointed instrument) into or through another object: stuck a fork into the turkey.
b. To jab or poke (a pointed or narrow instrument) into or against: The robber stuck a pistol in my ribs.
c. To place or position by pushing or thrusting: stick candles on the cake; stick a flower through a buttonhole.
3.
a. To fix, impale, or transfix on a pointed object: stick an olive on a toothpick.
b. To cover or decorate with objects piercing the surface: stick a map with pins.
4.
a. To fasten into place by forcing an end or point into something: stick a tack on the wall.
b. To fasten or attach with pins, nails, or similar devices: stuck the announcement on the bulletin board.
c. To fasten or attach with an adhesive material, such as glue or tape.
5. Sports To execute (a landing or dismount) in gymnastics so that the feet do not move after they hit the ground.
6. To detain or delay: We were stuck at the airport overnight.
7. Informal To confuse, baffle, or puzzle: I started doing the math problems, but I got stuck.
8. past tense and past participle sticked (stĭkt) To prop (a plant) with sticks or brush on which to grow.
9. past tense and past participle sticked Printing To set (type) in a composing stick.
10. To cover or smear with something sticky.
11. Informal To put blame or responsibility on; burden: stuck me with the bill.
12. Slang To defraud or cheat: The dealer stuck me with shoddy merchandise.
v.intr.
1. To be or become fixed or embedded in place by having the point thrust in: The spear stuck in the shield.
2. To become or remain attached or in close association; cling: stick together in a crowd.
3.
a. To remain firm, determined, or resolute: stuck to basic principles.
b. To remain loyal or faithful: stuck by her through hard times.
c. To persist or endure: a bad name that has stuck.
4. To scruple or hesitate: She sticks at nothing—no matter how difficult.
5. To become fixed, blocked, checked, or obstructed: The drawer stuck and would not open.
6. To project or protrude: hair sticking out on his head.
7. Sports To throw a jab in boxing.
Phrasal Verbs:
stick around Informal
To remain; linger.
stick out
1. To be prominent or noticeable.
2. Informal To continue in or endure: stick out a bad situation.
stick up
To rob, especially at gunpoint.
Idioms:
be stuck on Informal
To be very fond of.
stick it to Slang
To treat severely or wrongfully.
stick (one's) neck out Informal
To make oneself vulnerable; take a risk.
stick to/by one's guns
To hold fast to an opinion or a set course of action.
stick to (one's) knitting Informal
To mind one's own business.
stick to (one's) ribs Informal
To be substantial or filling. Used of food.
stick up for
To defend or support.

[Middle English stikke, from Old English sticca; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]

stick around

or

stick about

vb
(intr, adverb) informal to remain in a place, esp awaiting something
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.stick around - be available or ready for a certain function or service
wait - stay in one place and anticipate or expect something; "I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets"
2.stick around - stay put (in a certain place); "We are staying in Detroit; we are not moving to Cincinnati"; "Stay put in the corner here!"; "Stick around and you will learn something!"
stay in place - be stationary

stick

noun
1. A fairly long straight piece of solid material used especially as a support in walking:
2. A relatively long, straight, rigid piece of metal or other solid material:
verb
1. To cause to penetrate with force:
2. To become or cause to become stuck or lodged:
3. To hold fast:
4. To deposit in a specified place:
5. Informal. To make incapable of finding something to think, do, or say:
Informal: flummox, stump, throw.
Slang: beat.
Idiom: put someone at a loss.
6. Informal. To force (another) to accept a burden:
7. Slang. To get money or something else from by deceitful trickery:
Informal: chisel, flimflam, take, trim.
Slang: diddle, do, gyp, sting.
phrasal verb
stick around
Informal. To continue to be in a place:
Idiom: stay put.
phrasal verb
stick out
1. To curve outward past the normal or usual limit:
2. To be obtrusively conspicuous:
Idioms: stare someone in the face, stick out like a sore thumb.
phrasal verb
stick up
To take property or possessions from (a person or company, for example) unlawfully and usually forcibly:
Slang: heist, knock off.
Translations

w>stick around

vi (inf)dableiben; stick around!warts ab!; he decided to stick around Bonner beschloss, noch in Bonn zu bleiben
References in classic literature ?
Stick around, stick around, and you'll wear diamonds, maybe.
There's not much for her to stick around for, But Ronnie has other ideas and she hits Kat and Alfie with a bombshell that spells big changes for them - and for the show.
You need to let him know you won't stick around if he carries on taking you for granted.
We may stick around and see the other bands but maybe not if it's rock because that's not for me.
For some reason or another, he thinks it would be helpful if I could stick around a little while longer," Kilkenny said.
Hopefully Monty can stick around a bit and the rest of the tail have got stick around too.
Thanks to some savvy bargaining by his Gran (also dead), Logan is allowed to stick around and see how his absence will affect his little sister, Amy.
But when momma reminds him that there are perks to being a big brother, Oliver decides to stick around and share his wisdom with the new baby.
No word yet on whether he'll stick around long enough to unpack this time.