stiffly


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stiff

 (stĭf)
adj. stiff·er, stiff·est
1. Difficult to bend or fold: stiff new shoes; a stiff collar.
2.
a. Not moving or operating easily or freely; resistant: a stiff hinge.
b. Lacking ease or comfort of movement; not limber: a stiff neck.
3. Not liquid, loose, or fluid; thick: stiff dough.
4.
a. Reserved in manner or strict in observing decorum: a stiff commanding officer.
b. Lacking grace or easy charm; very formal: a stiff writing style.
5. Firm, as in purpose; resolute: stiff in their opposition.
6. Having a strong, swift, steady force or movement: a stiff current; a stiff breeze.
7. Potent or strong: a stiff drink.
8.
a. Difficult to deal with, do, or meet: stiff requirements for admission; a stiff examination.
b. Harsh or severe: a stiff penalty.
c. Excessively high or onerous: a stiff price.
9. Nautical Not heeling over much in spite of great wind or the press of the sail.
adv.
1. In a stiff manner: frozen stiff.
2. To a complete extent; totally: bored stiff.
n. Slang
1. A corpse.
2. A person regarded as constrained, priggish, or overly formal.
3. A drunk.
4. A person: a lucky stiff; just an ordinary working stiff.
5. A hobo; a tramp.
6. A person who tips poorly.
tr.v. stiffed, stiff·ing, stiffs Slang
1. To tip (someone) inadequately or not at all, as for a service rendered: paid the dinner check but stiffed the waiter.
2.
a. To cheat (someone) of something owed: My roommate stiffed me out of last month's rent.
b. To fail to give or supply (something expected or promised).

[Middle English, from Old English stīf.]

stiff′ish adj.
stiff′ly adv.
stiff′ness n.
Synonyms: stiff, rigid, inflexible, inelastic, tense1
These adjectives describe what is very firm and does not easily bend or give way. Stiff, the least specific, refers to what can be flexed only with difficulty (a brush with stiff bristles); with reference to persons it often suggests a lack of ease, cold formality, or fixity, as of purpose: "stiff in opinions" (John Dryden).
Rigid and inflexible apply to what cannot be bent without damage or deformation (a table of rigid plastic; an inflexible knife blade); figuratively they describe what does not relent or yield: "under the dictates of a rigid disciplinarian" (Thomas B. Aldrich)."In religion the law is written, and inflexible, never to do evil" (Oliver Goldsmith).
Inelastic refers largely to what will not stretch and spring back without marked physical change: inelastic construction materials. By extension it implies an absence of change in the face of changing circumstances: "My little pension is woefully inelastic" (Flann O'Brien).
Tense means stretched tight and figuratively applies to what is marked by tautness or strain: "that tense moment of expectation" (Arnold Bennett).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.stiffly - in a stiff manner; "his hands lay stiffly"
2.stiffly - in a rigid manner; "the body was rigidly erect"; "he sat bolt upright"
Translations
بِصَلابَه
upjatě
stift
makacsul
af stífni
úpäto
sert şekildesoğuk

stiffly

[ˈstɪflɪ] ADV
1. (= firmly) the napkins were stiffly starchedlas servilletas estaban almidonadas y tiesas
2. (= uncomfortably) [walk, move, bend] → con rigidez
she stood up stifflyse levantó tieso
3. (= coldly, formally) [smile, greet] → con formalidad; [say] → con frialdad, fríamente; [nod, bow] → fríamente, con formalidad
they sat stiffly on the edges of their chairsestaban sentados tiesos en el borde de las sillas

stiffly

[ˈstɪfli] adv
[sit, walk, move, stand] → avec raideur
(= coldly) [say, smile] → sèchement

stiffly

advsteif; starchedkräftig

stiffly

[ˈstɪflɪ] adv (walk, move) → rigidamente; (smile, bow) → freddamente

stiff

(stif) adjective
1. rigid or firm, and not easily bent, folded etc. He has walked with a stiff leg since he injured his knee; stiff cardboard.
2. moving, or moved, with difficulty, pain etc. I can't turn the key – the lock is stiff; I woke up with a stiff neck; I felt stiff the day after the climb.
3. (of a cooking mixture etc) thick, and not flowing. a stiff dough.
4. difficult to do. a stiff examination.
5. strong. a stiff breeze.
6. (of a person or his manner etc) formal and unfriendly. I received a stiff note from the bank manager.
ˈstiffly adverb
ˈstiffness noun
ˈstiffen verb
to make or become stiff(er). You can stiffen cotton with starch; He stiffened when he heard the unexpected sound.
ˈstiffening noun
material used to stiffen something. The collar has some stiffening in it.
bore/scare stiff
to bore or frighten very much.
References in classic literature ?
Amy followed, but she poked her hands out stiffly before her, and jerked herself along as if she went by machinery, and her "Ow
I don't see that we are called upon to answer that question," replied Professor Bumper stiffly.
He wore a sombrero hat, with a wide leather band and a bright buckle, and the ends of his moustache were twisted up stiffly, like little horns.
Velvet garments sombre but rich, stiffly plaited ruffs and bands, embroidered gloves, venerable beards, the mien and countenance of authority, made it easy to distinguish the gentleman of worship, at that period, from the tradesman, with his plodding air, or the laborer, in his leathern jerkin, stealing awe-stricken into the house which he had perhaps helped to build.
Her masts--cut somewhere on the coast of Japan, where her original ones were lost overboard in a gale --her masts stood stiffly up like the spines of the three old kings of Cologne.
Some hold their hands out stiffly, some drop them loosely at their sides.
and slowly and stiffly the old creature rose, and got her basket on her head again; but before she went out, she looked at the quadroon girt, who still stood playing with her ear-drops.
When I was ready to leave, I observed two wrinkled old women standing stiffly upright against the inner wall, near the door, with their brown palms open to receive alms.
She was so slender and so stiffly starched that she slid from space to space on the leather cushions, though she braced herself against the middle seat with her feet and extended her cotton-gloved hands on each side, in order to maintain some sort of balance.
Ferrars looked exceedingly angry, and drawing herself up more stiffly than ever, pronounced in retort this bitter philippic, "Miss Morton is Lord Morton's daughter.
All eyes met her with a glance of eager curiosity, and she met all eyes with one of rebuff and coldness; she looked neither flurried nor merry: she walked stiffly to her seat, and took it in silence.
I am Mary Lennox," the little girl said, drawing herself up stiffly.