stifle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sti·fle 1

 (stī′fəl)
tr.v. sti·fled, sti·fling, sti·fles
1. To interrupt or cut off (the voice, for example).
2. To keep in or hold back; repress: stifled my indignation.
3. To kill by preventing respiration; smother or suffocate.

[Middle English stifilen, alteration (influenced by Old Norse stīfla, to stop up) of stuffen, stuflen, to stifle, choke, drown, from Old French estoufer, of Germanic origin.]

sti′fler n.

sti·fle 2

 (stī′fəl)
n.
The joint of the hind leg analogous to the human knee in certain quadrupeds, such as the horse.

[Middle English, possibly from Old French estivel, pipe, leg, tibia, from Latin stīpes, stick.]

stifle

(ˈstaɪfəl)
vb
1. (tr) to smother or suppress: stifle a cough.
2. to feel or cause to feel discomfort and difficulty in breathing
3. to prevent or be prevented from breathing so as to cause death
4. (tr) to crush or stamp out
[C14: variant of stuflen, probably from Old French estouffer to smother]
ˈstifler n

stifle

(ˈstaɪfəl)
n
(Zoology) the joint in the hind leg of a horse, dog, etc, between the femur and tibia
[C14: of unknown origin]

sti•fle1

(ˈstaɪ fəl)

v. -fled, -fling. v.t.
1. to quell, crush, or end by force.
2. to suppress, curb, or withhold: to stifle a yawn.
3. to kill by impeding respiration; smother.
v.i.
4. to suffer from difficulty in breathing, as in a close atmosphere.
5. to become stifled or suffocated.
[1350–1400; < Old Norse stīfla, akin to stīfr stiff]
sti′fler, n.

sti•fle2

(ˈstaɪ fəl)

n.
(in a horse or other quadruped) the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee. Also called sti′fle joint`..
[1275–1325; Middle English, of uncertain orig.]

stifle


Past participle: stifled
Gerund: stifling

Imperative
stifle
stifle
Present
I stifle
you stifle
he/she/it stifles
we stifle
you stifle
they stifle
Preterite
I stifled
you stifled
he/she/it stifled
we stifled
you stifled
they stifled
Present Continuous
I am stifling
you are stifling
he/she/it is stifling
we are stifling
you are stifling
they are stifling
Present Perfect
I have stifled
you have stifled
he/she/it has stifled
we have stifled
you have stifled
they have stifled
Past Continuous
I was stifling
you were stifling
he/she/it was stifling
we were stifling
you were stifling
they were stifling
Past Perfect
I had stifled
you had stifled
he/she/it had stifled
we had stifled
you had stifled
they had stifled
Future
I will stifle
you will stifle
he/she/it will stifle
we will stifle
you will stifle
they will stifle
Future Perfect
I will have stifled
you will have stifled
he/she/it will have stifled
we will have stifled
you will have stifled
they will have stifled
Future Continuous
I will be stifling
you will be stifling
he/she/it will be stifling
we will be stifling
you will be stifling
they will be stifling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stifling
you have been stifling
he/she/it has been stifling
we have been stifling
you have been stifling
they have been stifling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stifling
you will have been stifling
he/she/it will have been stifling
we will have been stifling
you will have been stifling
they will have been stifling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stifling
you had been stifling
he/she/it had been stifling
we had been stifling
you had been stifling
they had been stifling
Conditional
I would stifle
you would stifle
he/she/it would stifle
we would stifle
you would stifle
they would stifle
Past Conditional
I would have stifled
you would have stifled
he/she/it would have stifled
we would have stifled
you would have stifled
they would have stifled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stifle - joint between the femur and tibia in a quadrupedstifle - joint between the femur and tibia in a quadruped; corresponds to the human knee
hind leg - the back limb of a quadruped
articulatio, joint, articulation - (anatomy) the point of connection between two bones or elements of a skeleton (especially if it allows motion)
Verb1.stifle - conceal or hide; "smother a yawn"; "muffle one's anger"; "strangle a yawn"
conquer, inhibit, stamp down, suppress, subdue, curb - to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires"
2.stifle - smother or suppress; "Stifle your curiosity"
suffocate, choke - suppress the development, creativity, or imagination of; "His job suffocated him"
conquer, inhibit, stamp down, suppress, subdue, curb - to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires"
stimulate, excite - act as a stimulant; "The book stimulated her imagination"; "This play stimulates"
3.stifle - impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage ofstifle - impair the respiration of or obstruct the air passage of; "The foul air was slowly suffocating the children"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
4.stifle - be asphyxiatedstifle - be asphyxiated; die from lack of oxygen; "The child suffocated under the pillow"
croak, decease, die, drop dead, buy the farm, cash in one's chips, give-up the ghost, kick the bucket, pass away, perish, snuff it, pop off, expire, conk, exit, choke, go, pass - pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life; "She died from cancer"; "The children perished in the fire"; "The patient went peacefully"; "The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102"
strangle - die from strangulation
asphyxiate, suffocate, smother - deprive of oxygen and prevent from breathing; "Othello smothered Desdemona with a pillow"; "The child suffocated herself with a plastic bag that the parents had left on the floor"

stifle

verb
1. suppress, repress, prevent, stop, check, silence, curb, restrain, cover up, gag, hush, smother, extinguish, muffle, choke back Critics have accused them of trying to stifle debate.
2. restrain, suppress, repress, smother She makes no attempt to stifle a yawn.

stifle

verb
1. To hold (something requiring an outlet) in check:
Informal: sit on (or upon).
2. To decrease or dull the sound of:
3. To keep from being published or transmitted:
4. To stop the breathing of:
Translations
يُخْمِد الناريَخْنُق، يُخْمِديَكْبِت
dusitpotlačitudusit
kvæleundertrykke
bæla, halda aftur afkæfa, slökkvakæfa; kafna
apspiestnodzēstnoslāpētnosmacētnosmakt
udusiť

stifle

[ˈstaɪfl]
A. VT
1. [+ person] → ahogar, sofocar
2. (fig) → suprimir
to stifle a yawncontener un bostezo
to stifle oppositionreprimir a la oposición
B. VIahogarse, sofocarse

stifle

[ˈstaɪfəl] vt
(= suppress) [+ yawn, laugh] → étouffer
(= repress) [+ creativity, debate] → étouffer
(= suffocate) → étouffer

stifle

vt (= suffocate)ersticken; (fig) laugh, cough also, rage, oppositionunterdrücken; the heat nearly stifled themsie sind fast umgekommen vor Hitze
viersticken

stifle

[ˈstaɪfl]
1. vt (yawn, sob, anger) → soffocare; (desire, smile) → reprimere; (revolt, opposition) → stroncare
2. visoffocare

stifle

(ˈstaifl) verb
1. to prevent, or be prevented, from breathing (easily) eg because of bad air, an obstruction over the mouth and nose etc; to suffocate. He was stifled to death when smoke filled his bedroom; I'm stifling in this heat!
2. to extinguish or put out (flames).
3. to suppress (a yawn, a laugh etc).
ˈstifling adjective
very hot, stuffy etc. stifling heat; It's stifling in here.
References in classic literature ?
Nor can piety itself, at such a shameful sight, completely stifle her upbraidings against the permitting stars.
And now shall we leave him in the hands of his enemies--shall we allow them to stifle and stultify his example?
This idea, consolatory in theory, I felt would be terrible if realised: with all my might I endeavoured to stifle it- -I endeavoured to be firm.
Dickon laughed so that he was obliged to stifle the sound by putting his arm over his mouth.
Agatha had seen Henrietta clasping his neck in her arms, but had not waited to hear the exclamation of "Sidney, Sidney," which followed, nor to see him press her face to his breast in his anxiety to stifle her voice as he said, "My darling love, don't screech I implore you.
The plots, in that kingdom, are usually the workmanship of those persons who desire to raise their own characters of profound politicians; to restore new vigour to a crazy administration; to stifle or divert general discontents; to fill their coffers with forfeitures; and raise, or sink the opinion of public credit, as either shall best answer their private advantage.
The habit of being continually marshalled on opposite sides will be too apt to stifle the voice both of law and of equity.
By a judicious use of this Law of Nature, the Polygons and Circles are almost always able to stifle sedition in its very cradle, taking advantage of the irrepressible and boundless hopefulness of the human mind.
I tried to stifle all that was continually seething within me by means of external impressions.
Cries were soon heard, and then moans, which someone appeared to be endeavoring to stifle.
All Villefort's influence barely enabled him to stifle the secret Dantes had so nearly divulged.
I have sought to stifle remorse by twenty years of good deeds; I have assuaged the natural ferocity of those who shed blood; on every occasion I have exposed my life to save those who were in danger, and I have preserved lives in exchange for that I took away.