stimulus


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Related to stimulus: unconditioned stimulus, stimuli

stim·u·lus

 (stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stim·u·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.
3.
a. Something that incites or rouses to action; an incentive: "Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination" (W.H. Auden).
b. Government spending designed to generate or increase economic activity.

[Latin, goad.]

stimulus

(ˈstɪmjʊləs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ; -ˌliː)
1. something that stimulates or acts as an incentive
2. (Physiology) any drug, agent, electrical impulse, or other factor able to cause a response in an organism
3. (Psychology) an object or event that is apprehended by the senses
4. (Pharmacology) med a former name for stimulant
[C17: from Latin: a cattle goad]

stim•u•lus

(ˈstɪm yə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. something that incites or quickens action, feeling, thought, etc.
2. something that excites an organism or part to functional activity.
[1605–15; < Latin: a goad, stimulus]

stim·u·lus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
Plural stimuli (stĭm′yə-lī′)
Something that causes a response in a body part or organism. A stimulus may be internal or external. Sense organs, such as the ear, and sensory receptors, such as those in the skin, are sensitive to external stimuli such as sound and touch.

stimulus

Any change that evokes a response from an organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stimulus - any stimulating information or eventstimulus - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
elicitation, evocation, induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
kick - the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs); "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"
turn-on - something causing excitement or stimulating interest
negative stimulation, turnoff - something causing antagonism or loss of interest
conditioned stimulus - the stimulus that is the occasion for a conditioned response
reinforcer, reinforcing stimulus, reinforcement - (psychology) a stimulus that strengthens or weakens the behavior that produced it
discriminative stimulus, cue - a stimulus that provides information about what to do
positive stimulus - a stimulus with desirable consequences
negative stimulus - a stimulus with undesirable consequences

stimulus

noun incentive, spur, encouragement, impetus, provocation, inducement, goad, incitement, fillip, shot in the arm (informal), clarion call, geeing-up Falling interest rates could be a stimulus to the economy.

stimulus

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that incites especially a violent response:
Translations
باعِث، دافِعمُثير، حافِز
hnací sílapodnět
motivationstimulus
inger
áreiti, ertingörvun, hvatning; drifkraftur
pamudinājumsstimuls
hnacia sila

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] N (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]estímulo m, incentivo m

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] [stimuli] [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ] (pl) n
(= encouragement) → stimulant m
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY)stimulus m
(BIOLOGY)stimulus m

stimulus

n pl <stimuli> → Anreiz m, → Ansporn m; (= inspiration)Anregung f, → Stimulus m; (Physiol) → Reiz m; (Psych) → Stimulus m; it gave the trade new stimulusdas hat dem Handel neuen Aufschwung gegeben

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] n (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]stimolo
it gave trade a new stimulus → ha dato un nuovo impulso al commercio
under the stimulus of → stimolato/a da

stimulus

(ˈstimjuləs) plural ˈstimuli (-liː) noun
1. something that causes a reaction in a living thing. Light is the stimulus that causes a flower to open.
2. something that rouses or encourages a person etc to action or greater effort. Many people think that children need the stimulus of competition to make them work better in school.

stim·u·lus

n. estímulo, cualquier agente o factor que produce una reacción;
conditioned ______ condicionado;
subliminal ______ sublimado.

stimulus

n (pl -li) estímulo
References in classic literature ?
The delicate compliment to their confidential relations and the slight stimulus of liquor had tremulously exalted Whiskey Dick.
As no one makes any profit by the sale, there is no longer any stimulus to extravagance, and no misrepresentation; no cheating, no adulteration or imitation, no bribery or
said my reason, forced by the agonising stimulus into precocious though transitory power: and Resolve, equally wrought up, instigated some strange expedient to achieve escape from insupportable oppression--as running away, or, if that could not be effected, never eating or drinking more, and letting myself die.
Chillip, his eyelids getting quite red with the unwonted stimulus in which he was indulging.
Marner's cottage had no thatch; and Dunstan's first act, after a train of thought made rapid by the stimulus of cupidity, was to go up to the bed; but while he did so, his eyes travelled eagerly over the floor, where the bricks, distinct in the fire-light, were discernible under the sprinkling of sand.
Then a druggist named Engel gave him a copy of Muller's book on physics, which was precisely the stimulus needed by his creative brain.
Worldly interest and commercial speculation entered largely into the views of other settlers, but the commands of conscience were the only stimulus to the emigrants from Leyden.
Not a few openly avowed themselves converted to antagonism; the rest needed only a slight stimulus to make a similar avowal.
While the count picked up the paper he put spurs to his horse, which leaped in astonishment at such an unusual stimulus, and shot away with the rapidity of an arrow.
Zephaniah Crypt's Charity, under the stimulus of a late visitation by commissioners, were beginning to apply long- accumulating funds to the rebuilding of the Yellow Coat School, which was henceforth to be carried forward on a greatly-extended scale, the testator having left no restrictions concerning the curriculum, but only concerning the coat.
Besides, one wants the stimulus of sympathy, and I have never had that since poor D'Oyley left Treddleston.
Frances did not become pale or feeble in consequence of her sedentary employment; perhaps the stimulus it communicated to her mind counterbalanced the inaction it imposed on her body.