stimulus


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Related to stimulus: unconditioned stimulus, stimuli

stim·u·lus

 (stĭm′yə-ləs)
n. pl. stim·u·li (-lī′)
1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response.
2. An agent, action, or condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response.
3.
a. Something that incites or rouses to action; an incentive: "Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination" (W.H. Auden).
b. Government spending designed to generate or increase economic activity.

[Latin, goad.]

stimulus

(ˈstɪmjʊləs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ; -ˌliː)
1. something that stimulates or acts as an incentive
2. (Physiology) any drug, agent, electrical impulse, or other factor able to cause a response in an organism
3. (Psychology) an object or event that is apprehended by the senses
4. (Pharmacology) med a former name for stimulant
[C17: from Latin: a cattle goad]

stim•u•lus

(ˈstɪm yə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. something that incites or quickens action, feeling, thought, etc.
2. something that excites an organism or part to functional activity.
[1605–15; < Latin: a goad, stimulus]

stim·u·lus

(stĭm′yə-ləs)
Plural stimuli (stĭm′yə-lī′)
Something that causes a response in a body part or organism. A stimulus may be internal or external. Sense organs, such as the ear, and sensory receptors, such as those in the skin, are sensitive to external stimuli such as sound and touch.

stimulus

Any change that evokes a response from an organism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stimulus - any stimulating information or eventstimulus - any stimulating information or event; acts to arouse action
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
elicitation, evocation, induction - stimulation that calls up (draws forth) a particular class of behaviors; "the elicitation of his testimony was not easy"
kick - the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs); "a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick"
turn-on - something causing excitement or stimulating interest
negative stimulation, turnoff - something causing antagonism or loss of interest
conditioned stimulus - the stimulus that is the occasion for a conditioned response
reinforcer, reinforcing stimulus, reinforcement - (psychology) a stimulus that strengthens or weakens the behavior that produced it
discriminative stimulus, cue - a stimulus that provides information about what to do
positive stimulus - a stimulus with desirable consequences
negative stimulus - a stimulus with undesirable consequences

stimulus

noun incentive, spur, encouragement, impetus, provocation, inducement, goad, incitement, fillip, shot in the arm (informal), clarion call, geeing-up Falling interest rates could be a stimulus to the economy.

stimulus

noun
1. Something that causes and encourages a given response:
2. Something that incites especially a violent response:
Translations
باعِث، دافِعمُثير، حافِز
hnací sílapodnět
motivationstimulus
inger
áreiti, ertingörvun, hvatning; drifkraftur
pamudinājumsstimuls
hnacia sila

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] N (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]estímulo m, incentivo m

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] [stimuli] [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ] (pl) n
(= encouragement) → stimulant m
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY)stimulus m
(BIOLOGY)stimulus m

stimulus

n pl <stimuli> → Anreiz m, → Ansporn m; (= inspiration)Anregung f, → Stimulus m; (Physiol) → Reiz m; (Psych) → Stimulus m; it gave the trade new stimulusdas hat dem Handel neuen Aufschwung gegeben

stimulus

[ˈstɪmjʊləs] n (stimuli (pl)) [ˈstɪmjʊlaɪ]stimolo
it gave trade a new stimulus → ha dato un nuovo impulso al commercio
under the stimulus of → stimolato/a da

stimulus

(ˈstimjuləs) plural ˈstimuli (-liː) noun
1. something that causes a reaction in a living thing. Light is the stimulus that causes a flower to open.
2. something that rouses or encourages a person etc to action or greater effort. Many people think that children need the stimulus of competition to make them work better in school.

stim·u·lus

n. estímulo, cualquier agente o factor que produce una reacción;
conditioned ______ condicionado;
subliminal ______ sublimado.

stimulus

n (pl -li) estímulo
References in classic literature ?
I was no longer any unit at unequal strife with the elements; instincts common to my kind were no longer my only stimulus.
So I forced myself from my lethargy of despair and grief; and this thought, the sweetest thought of all my life, may or may not have been my unrealized stimulus ere now; it was in very deed my most conscious and perpetual spur henceforth until the end.
The consummating death I show unto you, which becometh a stimulus and promise to the living.
Not a few openly avowed themselves converted to antagonism; the rest needed only a slight stimulus to make a similar avowal.
They deny the justice of property, of capital, of inheritance, while I do not deny this chief stimulus.
My presence, however, does not appear to operate as a stimulus, and in this respect I am materially disappointed.
Nothing in the picture moved but Old Pretty's tail and Tess's pink hands, the latter so gently as to be a rhythmic pulsation only, as if they were obeying a reflex stimulus, like a beating heart.
at once the stimulus and the object of his desires.
The natural strength and firmness of his nature was beginning to assert itself, urged by the double stimulus of resentment against his aunts, and the sense that he must behave like a man and take care of his mother.
Great as was the stimulus of literary culture, it was only one of several influences that made up the Renaissance.
These three responses to a sensational stimulus differ, however, in many respects.
Marner's cottage had no thatch; and Dunstan's first act, after a train of thought made rapid by the stimulus of cupidity, was to go up to the bed; but while he did so, his eyes travelled eagerly over the floor, where the bricks, distinct in the fire-light, were discernible under the sprinkling of sand.