classical conditioning

(redirected from stimulus substitution)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

classical conditioning

n. Psychology
A learning process by which a subject comes to respond in a specific way to a previously neutral stimulus after the subject repeatedly encounters the neutral stimulus together with another stimulus that already elicits the response.

classical conditioning

n
(Psychology) psychol the alteration in responding that occurs when two stimuli are regularly paired in close succession: the response originally given to the second stimulus comes to be given to the first. See also conditioned response

con•di•tion•ing

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ)

n.
1. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed.
2. Also called classical conditioning. a process in which a previously neutral stimulus comes to evoke a specific response by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that evokes the response.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.classical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflexclassical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflex; the stimulus that evokes the reflex is given whether or not the conditioned response occurs until eventually the neutral stimulus comes to evoke the reflex
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
References in periodicals archive ?
The interbehavioral concepts of stimulus substitution and implicit responding are central to a range of complex behavioral events, including memory (Blewitt 1983; Fryling and Hayes 2010; Hayes 1998; Kantor and Smith 1975), perspective taking (DeBemardis et al.
The basis of superstitious behavior: Chance eontingency, stimulus substitution, or appetitive behavior?
CS and US) have additional functions for which stimulus substitution does not operate, stimulus substitution is only partial, applying only to the functions of stimuli that are shared as a result of conditioning.
Finally, we conclude that bidirectional relations are sufficiently supported by empirical research and are conceptually consistent with the notion of function transfer or stimulus substitution as to constitute the underlying foundation of all learning processes (Delgado and Hayes 2013).
Two are pertinent to the present study: the novel stimulus substitution procedure (e.