stinging


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sting

 (stĭng)
v. stung (stŭng), sting·ing, stings
v.tr.
1. To pierce or wound painfully with a sharp-pointed structure or organ, as that of certain insects.
2. To cause to feel a sharp, smarting pain: smoke stinging our eyes.
3. To cause to suffer keenly in the mind or feelings: Those harsh words stung me.
4. To spur on or stimulate by sharp irritation: "A meaningless retort; the kind someone is stung into making out of sheer exasperation" (Paul Scott).
5. Slang To cheat or overcharge.
v.intr.
1. To have, use, or wound with a sharp-pointed structure or organ: Do all bees sting?
2. To cause a sharp, smarting pain: The needle will sting a little.
n.
1. The act of stinging.
2. The wound or pain caused by stinging.
3. A sharp, piercing organ or part, often ejecting a venomous secretion, as the modified ovipositor of a bee or wasp or the spine of certain fishes.
4. A hurtful quality or power: the sting of rejection.
5. A keen stimulus or incitement; a goad or spur: the sting of curiosity.
6. Slang A confidence game, especially one implemented by undercover agents to apprehend criminals.

[Middle English stingen, from Old English stingan; see stegh- in Indo-European roots.]

sting′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stinging - a kind of painstinging - a kind of pain; something as sudden and painful as being stung; "the sting of death"; "he felt the stinging of nettles"
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
Adj.1.stinging - (of speech) harsh or hurtful in tone or character; "cutting remarks"; "edged satire"; "a stinging comment"
unkind - lacking kindness; "a thoughtless and unkind remark"; "the unkindest cut of all"

stinging

adjective
Translations

stinging

[ˈstɪŋɪŋ]
A. ADJ
1. [insect etc] → que pica, que tiene aguijón; [pain] → punzante
2. [remark etc] → mordaz
B. N (= sensation) → escozor m
C. CPD stinging nettle Nortiga f

stinging

adj
pain, sensation, blowstechend; cut, slap, ointmentbrennend; rainpeitschend; windscharf
(fig) commentstechend, schneidend; attackscharf
n (= sensation)Stechen nt

stinging

n dolor m, ardor m, picor m (esp. Esp)
References in classic literature ?
All about us the snow was crusted in shallow terraces, with tracings like ripple-marks at the edges, curly waves that were the actual impression of the stinging lash in the wind.
The little stinging, buzzing imps succeeded in dispelling a mood which might have held her there in the darkness half a night longer.
He presently encountered her and delivered a stinging remark as he passed.
Brocklehurst; the whole tenor of their conversation, was recent, raw, and stinging in my mind; I had felt every word as acutely as I had heard it plainly, and a passion of resentment fomented now within me.
She stamped her foot, wavered a moment, and then, irresistibly impelled by the naughty spirit within her, slapped me on the cheek: a stinging blow that filled both eyes with water.
Resist it as firmly, despise it as proudly as we may, all studied unkindness -- no matter how contemptible it may be -- has a stinging power in it which reaches to the quick.
He was under the shade of a tree, as has been said, and there, like flies on honey, thoughts came crowding upon him and stinging him.
For, although they can inflict instantaneous death by a retrograde movement, yet unless they can at once disengage their stinging extremity from the struggling body of their victim, their own frail bodies are liable to be shattered.
It angered him too, and at such times his mighty jaws came nearer to closing in the soft flesh of his friend than at any other, for he was still an ape, with an ape's short temper and brutal instincts; but the difficulty was in catching his tormentor while his rage lasted, for when he lost his head and rushed madly into close quarters with the boy he discovered that the stinging hail of blows released upon him always found their mark and effectually stopped him--effectually and painfully.
A little way up the hill, for instance, was a great heap of granite, bound together by masses of aluminium, a vast labyrinth of precipitous walls and crumpled heaps, amidst which were thick heaps of very beautiful pagoda-like plants--nettles possibly--but wonderfully tinted with brown about the leaves, and incapable of stinging.
Or did they interpret our spurts of fire, the sudden stinging of our shells, our steady investment of their encampment, as we should the furious unanimity of onslaught in a disturbed hive of bees?
Resentment--why, it is purification; it is a most stinging and painful consciousness