References in classic literature ?
Oh, MEESIS Munt, you mean to tell me that fresh aquariums stink less than salt?
Another century of readers--and spirit itself will stink.
A kind of longing seems to come over me for the London stink.
Then the bolts went back slowly, and the door opened, and there was the old Madman standing, looking precious scared--his jacket off, his shirt-sleeves up to his elbows, and his long skinny arms all covered with anchors and arrows and letters, tattooed in with gunpowder like a sailor-boy's, and a stink fit to knock you down coming out.
He had been kicking up horrid stinks for some time in his study, till I suppose some fellow told Mary, and she told the Doctor.
And tomorrow I shall be killed, perhaps not even by a Frenchman but by one of our own men, by a soldier discharging a musket close to my ear as one of them did yesterday, and the French will come and take me by head and heels and fling me into a hole that I may not stink under their noses, and new conditions of life will arise, which will seem quite ordinary to others and about which I shall know nothing.
I observed the young animal's flesh to smell very rank, and the stink was somewhat between a weasel and a fox, but much more disagreeable.
Through counter currents of the heavy stench of meat eaters he traced the trail of Bara; the sweet and cloying stink of Horta, the boar, could not drown his quarry's scent--the permeating, mellow musk of the deer's foot.
The schoolboy was officially known as Summers Minor, and in a more social manner as Stinks, the only public tribute to his career as an amateur photographer and electrician.
The fitful enthusiasm of Stinks at once caught fire, and he eagerly asked if the lights and the door worked together.
There was a silence, and then the unconquerable Stinks observed:
It was dirty and untidy, and it was filled with a pungent odour made up of many different stinks.