stinkwood


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stink·wood

 (stĭngk′wo͝od′)
n.
1.
a. A southern African deciduous tree (Ocotea bullata) having wood with an unpleasant odor.
b. The hard, heavy wood of this tree, used in cabinetwork.
2. Any of several trees having wood with an unpleasant odor.

stinkwood

(ˈstɪŋkˌwʊd)
n
1. (Forestry) any of various trees having offensive-smelling wood, esp Ocotea bullata, a southern African lauraceous tree yielding a hard wood used for furniture
2. (Forestry) the heavy durable wood of any of these trees
3. (Plants) Also called (NZ): hupiro a New Zealand shrub or small tree, Coprosma foetidissima, whose leaves give off an unpleasant smell when they are crushed

stink•wood

(ˈstɪŋkˌwʊd)

n.
1. any of several trees yielding fetid wood, esp. a South African tree, Ocotea bullata, of the laurel family.
2. the wood of any of these trees.
[1725–35]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The set of Sorrows and Rejoicings is dominated by a massive stinkwood table which anchors the action of the play.
Venturing further, she discovers that "[i]n the middle, a white stinkwood soars above the other trees and sprays out blue".
A Welsh fruitwood love spoon, probably from 1805, was sold for pounds 2,160 while a Cape Dutch ebony and stinkwood clothes press fetched pounds 11,400.
Tupelos of the Nyssa sylvatica ("of the forest") species are also known as black gum, sour gum, black tupelo, bowl gum, pepperidge, stinkwood, wild peartree, ogeechee tupelo, gopher plum, ogeechee plum and yellow gum.