stipend


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sti·pend

 (stī′pĕnd′, -pənd)
n.
A fixed and regular payment, such as a salary for services rendered or an allowance.

[Middle English stipendie, from Old French, from Latin stīpendium, soldier's pay, from *stipipendium : stips, stip-, a small payment + pendere, to weigh, pay; see suspend.]

stipend

(ˈstaɪpɛnd)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a fixed or regular amount of money paid as a salary or allowance, as to a clergyman
[C15: from Old French stipende, from Latin stīpendium tax, from stips a contribution + pendere to pay out]

sti•pend

(ˈstaɪ pɛnd)

n.
1. a periodic payment, esp. a scholarship or fellowship allowance granted to a student.
2. fixed or regular pay; salary.
[1400–50; late Middle English stipendie < Latin stīpendium soldier's pay, syncopated variant of *stipipendium=stipi-, comb. form of stips a coin + pend(ere) to weigh out, pay + -ium -ium1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stipend - a sum of money allotted on a regular basis; usually for some specific purpose
regular payment - a payment made at regular times
prebend - the stipend assigned by a cathedral to a canon

stipend

noun grant, award, subsidy, allowance, donation, endowment, allocation, benefaction Olympic probables receive a stipend of £6000 of lottery money a year.

stipend

noun
Translations

stipend

[ˈstaɪpend] Nsalario m, estipendio m

stipend

[ˈstaɪpɛnd] n
(mainly British) [vicar, magistrate] → traitement m

stipend

n (esp Brit: for official, clergyman) → Gehalt nt; (US: for student) → Stipendium nt

stipend

[ˈstaɪpɛnd] ncongrua
References in classic literature ?
The roof has been kept whole hitherto; but as the clergyman's stipend is only twenty pounds per annum, and a house with two rooms, threatening speedily to determine into one, no clergyman will undertake the duties of pastor: especially as it is currently reported that his flock would rather let him starve than increase the living by one penny from their own pockets.
Being a very honest little creature, and unwilling to disgrace the memory I was going to leave behind me at Murdstone and Grinby's, I considered myself bound to remain until Saturday night; and, as I had been paid a week's wages in advance when I first came there, not to present myself in the counting-house at the usual hour, to receive my stipend.
The fact is, they have no other attraction or reason for keeping the field than a trifle of stipend, which is not sufficient to make them willing to die for you.
Fleming, who had been headmaster for the quarter of a century, was become too deaf to continue his work to the greater glory of God; and when one of the livings on the outskirts of the city fell vacant, with a stipend of six hundred a year, the Chapter offered it to him in such a manner as to imply that they thought it high time for him to retire.
After a time--not, of course, at first-- he might be with me as my curate, and he would have so much to do that his stipend would be nearly what I used to get as vicar.
Dear Monsieur Gaudron," said Madame Baudoyer, "please help my father to compose a little speech that he could slip into the countess's ear when he takes her the monthly stipend,--a single sentence that would cover all
A pensioner he had said was "A slave of state hired by a stipend to obey his master.
That Mrs Kenwigs, impelled by gratitude, or ambition, or maternal pride, or maternal love, or all four powerful motives conjointly, had taken secret conference with Mr Kenwigs, and had finally returned to propose that Mr Johnson should instruct the four Miss Kenwigses in the French language as spoken by natives, at the weekly stipend of five shillings, current coin of the realm; being at the rate of one shilling per week, per each Miss Kenwigs, and one shilling over, until such time as the baby might be able to take it out in grammar.
The next day, on our return, we met seven very wild-looking Indians, of whom some were caciques that had just received from the Chilian government their yearly small stipend for having long remained faithful.
Without running up the rates, we give a hundred crowns to supplement the cure's stipend, we pay two hundred francs to the rural policeman, and as much again to the schoolmaster and schoolmistress.
The stipend arising hence would hardly have indulged the schoolmaster in the luxuries of life, had he not added to this office those of clerk and barber, and had not Mr Allworthy added to the whole an annuity of ten pounds, which the poor man received every Christmas, and with which he was enabled to cheer his heart during that sacred festival.
There was a certain stipend, sir, paid to you for your pupil, which may have warped your judgment a bit,' said Mr.