stitch


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Related to stitch: Skitch, stitch in time saves nine

stitch

 (stĭch)
n.
1.
a. A single complete movement of a threaded needle in sewing or surgical suturing: made multiple stitches.
b. A single loop of thread or yarn made with an implement such as a sewing or knitting needle.
c. A single loop or knot of thread used in closing a wound or incision in surgery; a suture.
d. A way of arranging the threads in sewing, knitting, crocheting, or suturing: used a purl stitch.
2. A sudden sharp pain, especially in the side. See Synonyms at pain.
3. Informal An article of clothing: wore not a stitch.
4. Informal The least part; a bit: didn't do a stitch of work.
v. stitched, stitch·ing, stitch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To fasten or join with stitches.
b. To mend or repair with stitches: stitched up the tear.
2. To decorate or ornament, as with stitches: "The sky was stitched with stars" (Mario Puzo).
3. To fasten together with staples or thread.
v.intr.
To make stitches; sew, knit, crochet, or suture.
Idiom:
in stitches Informal
Laughing uncontrollably.

[Middle English stiche, from Old English stice, sting; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]

stitch′er n.

stitch

(stɪtʃ)
n
1. (Knitting & Sewing) a link made by drawing a thread through material by means of a needle
2. (Knitting & Sewing) a loop of yarn formed around an implement used in knitting, crocheting, etc
3. (Knitting & Sewing) a particular method of stitching or shape of stitch
4. (Pathology) a sharp spasmodic pain in the side resulting from running or exercising
5. (Clothing & Fashion) (usually used with a negative) informal the least fragment of clothing: he wasn't wearing a stitch.
6. (Agriculture) agriculture the ridge between two furrows
7. (Knitting & Sewing) drop a stitch to allow a loop of wool to fall off a knitting needle accidentally while knitting
8. in stitches informal laughing uncontrollably
vb
9. (Knitting & Sewing) (tr) to sew, fasten, etc, with stitches
10. (Knitting & Sewing) (intr) to be engaged in sewing
11. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) to bind together (the leaves of a book, pamphlet, etc) with wire staples or thread
n, vb
(Surgery) an informal word for suture1b, suture6
[Old English stice sting; related to Old Frisian steke, Old High German stih, Gothic stiks, Old Norse tikta sharp]
ˈstitcher n

stitch

(stɪtʃ)

n.
1. one complete movement of a threaded needle through a fabric or material such as to leave behind a single loop or portion of thread, as in sewing or the surgical closing of wounds.
2. the loop or portion of thread so left.
3. one complete movement of the needle or other implement in knitting, crocheting, tatting, etc.
4.
a. a particular mode of disposing the thread or yarn in sewing, knitting, crocheting, etc.
b. the style of work produced by this.
5. a thread, bit, or piece of any fabric or of clothing: not a stitch of clothes on.
6. the least bit of anything: They wouldn't do a stitch of work.
7. a sudden, sharp pain, esp. in the intercostal muscles: a stitch in the side.
v.t.
8. to work upon, join, mend, or fasten with or as if with stitches; sew.
9. to ornament or embellish with stitches.
v.i.
10. to make stitches, join together, or sew.
Idioms:
in stitches, convulsed with laughter.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English stiche, Old English stice a thrust, stab, c. Old Frisian steke, Old High German stih, Gothic stiks point; akin to stick2]
stitch′er, n.

stitch


Past participle: stitched
Gerund: stitching

Imperative
stitch
stitch
Present
I stitch
you stitch
he/she/it stitches
we stitch
you stitch
they stitch
Preterite
I stitched
you stitched
he/she/it stitched
we stitched
you stitched
they stitched
Present Continuous
I am stitching
you are stitching
he/she/it is stitching
we are stitching
you are stitching
they are stitching
Present Perfect
I have stitched
you have stitched
he/she/it has stitched
we have stitched
you have stitched
they have stitched
Past Continuous
I was stitching
you were stitching
he/she/it was stitching
we were stitching
you were stitching
they were stitching
Past Perfect
I had stitched
you had stitched
he/she/it had stitched
we had stitched
you had stitched
they had stitched
Future
I will stitch
you will stitch
he/she/it will stitch
we will stitch
you will stitch
they will stitch
Future Perfect
I will have stitched
you will have stitched
he/she/it will have stitched
we will have stitched
you will have stitched
they will have stitched
Future Continuous
I will be stitching
you will be stitching
he/she/it will be stitching
we will be stitching
you will be stitching
they will be stitching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stitching
you have been stitching
he/she/it has been stitching
we have been stitching
you have been stitching
they have been stitching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stitching
you will have been stitching
he/she/it will have been stitching
we will have been stitching
you will have been stitching
they will have been stitching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stitching
you had been stitching
he/she/it had been stitching
we had been stitching
you had been stitching
they had been stitching
Conditional
I would stitch
you would stitch
he/she/it would stitch
we would stitch
you would stitch
they would stitch
Past Conditional
I would have stitched
you would have stitched
he/she/it would have stitched
we would have stitched
you would have stitched
they would have stitched

stitch

A sharp pain in the side that can occur during strenuous exercise.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stitch - a link or loop or knot made by an implement in knitting, crocheting, embroidery, or sewingstitch - a link or loop or knot made by an implement in knitting, crocheting, embroidery, or sewing
crochet stitch - any one of a number of stitches made by pulling a loop of yarn through another loop with a crochet needle
knitting stitch - a stitch taken in knitting
stitchery, sewing - needlework on which you are working with needle and thread; "she put her sewing back in the basket"
embroidery stitch, sewing stitch - a stitch made with thread and a threaded sewing needle through fabric or leather
2.stitch - a sharp spasm of pain in the side resulting from running
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
Verb1.stitch - fasten by sewing; do needlework
hem - fold over and sew together to provide with a hem; "hem my skirt"
resew - sew again; "The cuff of the coat had been resewn"
overcast - sew with an overcast stitch from one section to the next; "overcast books"
overcast - sew over the edge of with long slanting wide stitches
backstitch - do backstitches
pucker, tuck, gather - draw together into folds or puckers
finedraw - sew together very finely
fell - sew a seam by folding the edges
baste, tack - sew together loosely, with large stitches; "baste a hem"
hemstitch - sew with hemstitches; "hemstitch a sleeve"
retick, tick - sew; "tick a mattress"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
cast on - make the first row of stitches when knitting
cast off - make the last row of stitches when knitting

stitch

verb
1. sew, tack, seam, hem, baste Fold the fabric and stitch the two layers together.
noun
1. pain, spasm, pang, twinge If you do get a stitch, try to run bent forward.
stitch someone up deceive, trick, cheat, betray, stab in the back He claimed that a police officer had threatened to stitch him up.
stitch something up clinch, settle, secure, seal, conclude, assure, set the seal on He has stitched up major deals all over the world to boost sales.

stitch

noun
A sensation of physical discomfort occurring as the result of disease or injury:
Informal: misery.
Translations
ألَم شَديددَرْزَةغُرْزَهقُطْبَهيَدْرُزُ
sešítstehokopíchánípřišít
stingsy=-maskemaskesidesting
ommelommella
sašitišav
öltésrávarrszem
hlaupastingurlykkja, saumur, sporsauma, staga ítiltekin aîferî; -prjón, -saumur
ひと針縫う
깁다한 바늘
dieglysdygsniavimasdygsnisdygsniuotiplyštantis iš juoko
adījumsasa sāpedūrējsdūrienspiešūt
steh
petljašivšivatizašiti
stygnsy
เย็บรอยเย็บ
khâumũi khâu

stitch

[stɪtʃ]
A. N
1. (Sew) → puntada f, punto m
she hadn't a stitch onandaba en cueros or (LAm) encuerada
a stitch in time saves ninemás vale prevenir que lamentar, una puntada a tiempo ahorra ciento
2. (Med) → punto m de sutura
to put stitches in a woundsuturar una herida
3. (= pain) → punto m, punzada f
to have a stitchtener flato
we were in stitchesnos moríamos or (LAm) partíamos de (la) risa
she had us all in stitchesnos hizo partirnos de risa
B. VT
1. (Sew) → coser
to stitch (up) a hemcoser un dobladillo
2. (Med) → suturar
to stitch (up) a woundsuturar una herida
C. VI (Sew) → coser
stitch up VT + ADV
1. (lit)
see stitch B
2. (= arrange, finalize) [+ agreement, deal] → concertar
3. (= frame) → vender, incriminar dolosamente

stitch

[ˈstɪtʃ]
n
(SEWING)point m
(KNITTING) (single loop)maille f; (style of knitting)point m
(MEDICINE)point de suture
I had five stitches → J'ai eu cinq points de suture.
(= pain) → point m de côté
to be in stitches (laughing)être plié(e) de rire
to have sb in stitches → faire hurler qn de rire
vt
(SEWING)coudre, piquer
(MEDICINE) (also stitch up) → suturer, recoudre

stitch

n
Stich m; (in knitting etc) → Masche f; (= kind of stitch, in knitting etc) → Muster nt; (in embroidery) → Stichart f; to put a few stitches in somethingetw mit ein paar Stichen nähen; to put stitches in a woundeine Wunde nähen; he had to have stitcheser musste genäht werden; he needed stitches in his armsein Arm musste genäht werden; to have the stitches taken outdie Fäden gezogen bekommen; a stitch in time saves nine (Prov) → was du heute kannst besorgen, das verschiebe nicht auf morgen (Prov)
(inf: = piece of clothing) she hadn’t a stitch onsie war splitter(faser)nackt (inf); I haven’t a stitch to wearich habe überhaupt nichts anzuziehen
(= pain)Seitenstiche pl
to be in stitches (inf, from laughing) → sich schieflachen (inf); the story had us all in stitcheswir haben uns alle darüber schiefgelacht (inf); he had us all in stitcheser brachte uns alle furchtbar zum Lachen (inf)
vt (Sew, Med) → nähen; book(zusammen)heften, broschieren; (= mend) hole, tearzunähen, stopfen; (= embroider)sticken
vinähen (→ at an +dat); (= embroider)sticken (→ at an +dat)

stitch

[stɪtʃ]
1. n (Sewing) → punto (Med) → punto (di sutura) (Knitting) → maglia, punto; (pain in side) → fitta (al fianco)
to put a few stitches in sth → mettere due punti a qc
a stitch in time saves nine (Proverb) → un punto in tempo ne salva cento
to put stitches in a wound → cucire una ferita
she hadn't a stitch on → era completamente nuda
we were in stitches (fam) → ridevamo a crepapelle
2. vt (Sewing) → cucire (Med) → suturare, cucire
to stitch up a hem/wound → cucire un orlo/una ferita
stitch down vt + advcucire
stitch on vt + adv (button) → attaccare; (button that's come off) → riattaccare

stitch

(stitʃ) noun
1. a loop made in thread, wool etc by a needle in sewing or knitting. She sewed the hem with small, neat stitches; Bother! I've dropped a stitch.
2. a type of stitch forming a particular pattern in sewing, knitting etc. The cloth was edged in blanket stitch; The jersey was knitted in stocking stitch.
3. a sharp pain in a person's side caused by eg running. I've got a stitch.
verb
to sew or put stitches into. She stitched the two pieces together; I stitched the button on.
ˈstitching noun
stitches. The stitching is very untidy.
in stitches
laughing a lot. His stories kept us in stitches.
stitch up
to close by stitching. The doctor stitched up the wound.

stitch

دَرْزَة, يَدْرُزُ sešít, steh sting, sy nähen, Stich βελονιά, συρράβω bordar, coser, puntada ommel, ommella coudre, point sašiti, šav cucire, punto ひと針, 縫う 깁다, 한 바늘 steek, stikken sting, sy szew, uszyć costurar, ponto стежок, шить stygn, sy เย็บ, รอยเย็บ dikiş, dikmek khâu, mũi khâu 用针缝, 缝合

stitch

n. punto de sutura;
vt. dar puntos.

stitch

n punto (de sutura); (pain in side) dolor m de costado; vt (también to — up) (fam) suturar, coser (fam)
References in classic literature ?
It had been wrought, as was easy to perceive, with wonderful skill of needlework; and the stitch (as I am assured by ladies conversant with such mysteries) gives evidence of a now forgotten art, not to be discovered even by the process of picking out the threads.
Your only salvation lies in eluding it; but if it comes sideways through the opposing water, then partly owing to the light buoyancy of the whaleboat, and the elasticity of its materials, a cracked rib or a dashed plank or two, a sort of stitch in the side, is generally the most serious result.
As it extended, I brought out a line of goods suitable for kings, and a nobby thing for duchesses and that sort, with ruffles down the fore- hatch and the running-gear clewed up with a feather- stitch to leeward and then hauled aft with a back-stay and triced up with a half-turn in the standing rigging forward of the weather-gaskets.
Now if you think you can baste two rows of white tape round the bottom of your pink skirt and keep it straight by the checks, I'll stitch them on for you and trim the waist and sleeves with pointed tape-trimming, so the dress'll be real pretty for second best.
My attention was now called off by Miss Smith desiring me to hold a skein of thread: while she was winding it, she talked to me from time to time, asking whether I had ever been at school before, whether I could mark, stitch, knit, &c.
Barkis accompanied with a nudge of his elbow that gave me quite a stitch in my side.
It would be impossible to detail every step of the lapsing of these monsters,--to tell how, day by day, the human semblance left them; how they gave up bandagings and wrappings, abandoned at last every stitch of clothing; how the hair began to spread over the exposed limbs; how their foreheads fell away and their faces projected; how the quasi-human intimacy I had permitted myself with some of them in the first month of my loneliness became a shuddering horror to recall.
This oath was no longer a vain menace; for the fastest sailer in the Mediterranean would have been unable to overtake the little tartan, that with every stitch of canvas set was flying before the wind to Leghorn.
The first stitch was made just as the clocks were striking the hour of five, on the morning of the fourteenth of April, 1831.
One morning I made a rent in this mantle; and to show the islanders with what facility it could be repaired, I lowered my bundle, and taking from it a needle and thread, proceeded to stitch up the opening.
Coarse he may be, and not one whom the owners would have chosen to command the Lady Jermyn; a good seaman none the less, who brought us round the Horn in foul weather without losing stitch or stick.
Luckily Good is a very decent surgeon, and so soon as his small box of medicines was forthcoming, having thoroughly cleansed the wounds, he managed to stitch up first Sir Henry's and then his own pretty satisfactorily, considering the imperfect light given by the primitive Kukuana lamp in the hut.