stitching


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stitch

 (stĭch)
n.
1.
a. A single complete movement of a threaded needle in sewing or surgical suturing: made multiple stitches.
b. A single loop of thread or yarn made with an implement such as a sewing or knitting needle.
c. A single loop or knot of thread used in closing a wound or incision in surgery; a suture.
d. A way of arranging the threads in sewing, knitting, crocheting, or suturing: used a purl stitch.
2. A sudden sharp pain, especially in the side. See Synonyms at pain.
3. Informal An article of clothing: wore not a stitch.
4. Informal The least part; a bit: didn't do a stitch of work.
v. stitched, stitch·ing, stitch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To fasten or join with stitches.
b. To mend or repair with stitches: stitched up the tear.
2. To decorate or ornament, as with stitches: "The sky was stitched with stars" (Mario Puzo).
3. To fasten together with staples or thread.
v.intr.
To make stitches; sew, knit, crochet, or suture.
Idiom:
in stitches Informal
Laughing uncontrollably.

[Middle English stiche, from Old English stice, sting; see steig- in Indo-European roots.]

stitch′er n.

stitching

(ˈstɪtʃɪŋ)
n
(Knitting & Sewing) a row of stitches in a piece of cloth
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stitching - joining or attaching by stitchesstitching - joining or attaching by stitches  
handicraft - a craft that requires skillful hands
blind stitching - stitching that is not easily seen or noticed
suturing - surgical joining of two surfaces
Translations
دَرْز
ševšití
syning
saumaskapur

stitching

[ˈstɪtʃɪŋ] N (Sew) → puntadas fpl (Med) → puntos mpl

stitching

[ˈstɪtʃɪŋ] ncouture fstitch-up [ˈstɪtʃʌp] n (British)coup m montéSt John Ambulance St John Ambulance Brigade [səntˌdʒɒn] n (British) association bénévole de secouristes

stitching

n (= seam)Naht f; (ornamental) → Zierstiche pl, → Ziernaht f; (= embroidery)Stickerei f; (of book)Broschur f

stitching

:
stitching machine
nStepp- or Heftmaschine f
stitching needle
nHeft- or Stücknadel f

stitching

[ˈstɪtʃɪŋ] ncucitura

stitch

(stitʃ) noun
1. a loop made in thread, wool etc by a needle in sewing or knitting. She sewed the hem with small, neat stitches; Bother! I've dropped a stitch.
2. a type of stitch forming a particular pattern in sewing, knitting etc. The cloth was edged in blanket stitch; The jersey was knitted in stocking stitch.
3. a sharp pain in a person's side caused by eg running. I've got a stitch.
verb
to sew or put stitches into. She stitched the two pieces together; I stitched the button on.
ˈstitching noun
stitches. The stitching is very untidy.
in stitches
laughing a lot. His stories kept us in stitches.
stitch up
to close by stitching. The doctor stitched up the wound.
References in classic literature ?
Six cents, lady," she said, nodding her head gently while she went on stitching.
She ceased talking, and, nodding her head, went on stitching.
She rubbed the dimness hastily out of them; it interfered with her stitching.
The moistness was in her old eyes again, and she had to wipe it away before she could go on stitching.
In other respects his costume was plain, and his hair evenly cut enough for customers, who were not close observers, to take him for a mere tailor's apprentice, perched behind the board, and carefully stitching cloth or velvet.
Then first in Delos did I and Homer, singers both, raise our strain -- stitching song in new hymns -- Phoebus Apollo with the golden sword, whom Leto bare.
They regarded this wonderful application of science with intense admiration; and whilst I was stitching away, old Marheyo, who was one of the lookers-on, suddenly clapped his hand to his forehead, and rushing to a corner of the house, drew forth a soiled and tattered strip of faded calico which he must have procured some time or other in traffic on the beach--and besought me eagerly to exercise a little of my art upon it.
which, after some time, during which I sat looking about me and thinking, and listening to the stitching in the room and the tune that was being hammered across the yard, appeared on a tray, and turned out to be for me.
And she told me, still smiling, that the more a woman was given to stitching and making things for herself, the greater was her passionate desire now and again to rush to the shops and 'be foolish.
The discreet Mary Anne resumed her seat and her silence, and stitched, and stitched, and was stitching when the schoolmaster's shadow came in before him, announcing that he might be instantly expected.
Erin shows you how a few simple steps can take the stress out of applique and provide you with hours of happy stitching.
LOCK-N-STITCH has developed sophisticated technology for metal stitching repair, thread repair, furnace brazing and fusion welding for marine and power applications.