stocks


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stock

 (stŏk)
n.
1. A supply accumulated for future use; a store.
2. The total merchandise kept on hand by a merchant, commercial establishment, warehouse, or manufacturer.
3.
a. All the animals kept or raised on a farm; livestock.
b. All the aquatic animals kept or raised in an aquaculture operation.
c. A population of wild animals, especially of a species that is also farmed: interactions between hatchery fish and wild stocks.
4.
a. A kind of financial security granting rights of ownership in a corporation, such as a claim to a portion of the assets and earnings of the corporation and the right to vote for the board of directors. Stock is issued and traded in units called shares.
b. The stock issued by a particular company: a mutual fund that invests in technology stocks.
c. Chiefly British The money invested in a corporation, including debt and equity.
d. Chiefly British A bond, especially a government bond.
5. The trunk or main stem of a tree or another plant.
6.
a. A plant or stem onto which a graft is made.
b. A plant or tree from which cuttings and slips are taken.
7.
a. The original progenitor of a family line.
b. The descendants of a common ancestor; a family line, especially of a specified character: comes from farming stock.
c. Ancestry or lineage; antecedents.
d. The type from which a group of animals or plants has descended.
e. A race, family, or other related group of animals or plants.
f. An ethnic group or other major division of the human race.
g. A group of related languages.
h. A group of related families of languages.
8.
a. The raw material out of which something is made.
b. Paper used for printing.
9. The broth in which meat, fish, bones, or vegetables are simmered for a relatively long period, used as a base in preparing soup, gravy, or sauces.
10.
a. A main upright part, especially a supporting structure or block.
b. stocks Nautical The timber frame that supports a ship during construction.
c. often stocks A frame in which a horse or other animal is held for shoeing or for veterinary treatment.
11. stocks A device consisting of a heavy timber frame with holes for confining the ankles and sometimes the wrists, formerly used for punishment.
12. Nautical A crosspiece at the end of the shank of an anchor.
13. The wooden block from which a bell is suspended.
14.
a. The rear wooden, metal, or plastic handle or support of a rifle, pistol, or automatic weapon, to which the barrel and mechanism are attached.
b. The long supporting structure and mooring beam of field-gun carriages that trails along the ground to provide stability and support.
15. A handle, such as that of a whip, a fishing rod, or various carpentry tools.
16. The frame of a plow, to which the share, handles, coulter, and other parts are fastened.
17.
a. A theatrical stock company.
b. The repertoire of such a company.
c. A theater or theatrical activity, especially outside of a main theatrical center: a small role in summer stock.
18. Botany Any of several Eurasian and Mediterranean plants of the genus Matthiola in the mustard family, especially M. incana, widely cultivated for its clusters of showy, fragrant, variously colored flowers.
19. Games The portion of a pack of cards or of a group of dominoes that is not dealt out but is drawn from during a game.
20. Geology A body of intrusive igneous rock of which less than 100 square kilometers (40 square miles) is exposed.
21. Zoology A compound organism, such as a colony of zooids.
22.
a. Personal reputation or status: a teacher whose stock with the students is rising.
b. Confidence or credence: I put no stock in that statement.
23.
a. A long white neckcloth worn as part of a formal riding habit.
b. A broad scarf worn around the neck, especially by certain clerics.
24. Rolling stock.
v. stocked, stock·ing, stocks
v.tr.
1. To provide or furnish with a stock of something, especially:
a. To supply (a shop) with merchandise.
b. To supply (a farm) with livestock.
c. To fill (a stream, for example) with fish.
2. To keep for future sale or use.
3. To provide (a rifle, for example) with a stock.
4. Obsolete To put (someone) in the stocks as a punishment.
v.intr.
1. To gather and lay in a supply of something: stock up on canned goods.
2. To put forth or sprout new shoots. Used of a plant.
adj.
1. Kept regularly in stock: a stock item.
2. Repeated regularly without any thought or originality; routine: a stock answer.
3. Employed in dealing with or caring for stock or merchandise: a stock clerk.
4.
a. Of or relating to the raising of livestock: stock farming.
b. Used for breeding: a stock mare.
5.
a. Of or relating to a stock company or its repertoire.
b. Of or being a conventional character or situation that recurs in many literary or cinematic works.
Idioms:
in stock
Available for sale or use; on hand.
out of stock
Not available for sale or use.

[Middle English stok, from Old English stocc, tree trunk. N., sense 18, short for stock-gillyflower (from their woody stems ).]

stock′age n.
stock′er n.

stocks

(stɒks)
pl n
1. (Historical Terms) history an instrument of punishment consisting of a heavy wooden frame with holes in which the feet, hands, or head of an offender were locked
2. (Veterinary Science) a frame in which an animal is held while receiving veterinary attention or while being shod
3. (Nautical Terms) a frame used to support a boat while under construction
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical a vertical post or shaft at the forward edge of a rudder, extended upwards for attachment to the steering controls
5. (Nautical Terms) on the stocks in preparation or under construction

stocks

The quantity of supplies and material on hand ready for use. See also operational stocks; theater operational stocks.

stocks

A synonym for shares.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stocks - a frame that supports a boat while it is under construction
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.stocks - a frame for constraining an animal while it is receiving veterinary attention or while being shod
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
3.stocks - a former instrument of punishment consisting of a heavy timber frame with holes in which the feet (and sometimes the hands) of an offender could be locked
instrument of punishment - an instrument designed and used to punish a condemned person
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
dokkláda
beddinggabestok
hajóépítõ állványkaloda
gapastokkurstokkar
doky
cezalandırma tahtasıkızaktezgâh

stock

(stok) noun
1. (often in plural) a store of goods in a shop, warehouse etc. Buy while stocks last!; The tools you require are in / out of stock (= available / not available).
2. a supply of something. We bought a large stock of food for the camping trip.
3. farm animals. He would like to purchase more (live) stock.
4. (often in plural) money lent to the government or to a business company at a fixed interest. government stock; He has $20,000 in stocks and shares.
5. liquid obtained by boiling meat, bones etc and used for making soup etc.
6. the handle of a whip, rifle etc.
adjective
common; usual. stock sizes of shoes.
verb
1. to keep a supply of for sale. Does this shop stock writing-paper?
2. to supply (a shop, farm etc) with goods, animals etc. He cannot afford to stock his farm.
ˈstockist noun
a person who stocks certain goods. These boots can be obtained from your local stockist.
stocks noun plural
1. the wooden framework upon which a ship is supported when being built, repaired etc.
2. formerly a wooden frame in which a criminal was fastened as a punishment.
ˈstockbroker noun
a person who buys and sells stocks and shares for others.
stock exchange
a place where stocks and shares are bought and sold.
stock market
a stock exchange, or the dealings on that.
ˈstockpile noun
a supply of goods or materials accumulated eg by a government in case of war or other emergency.
verb
to accumulate (a supply of this sort).
ˌstock-ˈstill adjective, adverb
motionless. He stood absolutely stock-still.
ˈstock-taking noun
a regular check of the goods in a shop, warehouse etc.
stock up
to accumulate a supply of (something). The boys were stocking up on/with chocolate and lemonade for their walk.
take stock
to form an opinion (about a situation etc). Before you decide, give yourself time to take stock (of the situation).
References in classic literature ?
And when he read his paper of an evening, Demi's colic got into the shipping list and Daisy's fall affected the price of stocks, for Mrs.
He had gone over to Klein's, looking up some cotton broker whom he wished to see in regard to securities, exchanges, stocks, bonds, or something of the sort, Madame Ratignolle did not remember what.
A landsman could hardly have worn this garb and shown this face, and worn and shown them both with such a galliard air, without undergoing stern question before a magistrate, and probably incurring a fine or imprisonment, or perhaps an exhibition in the stocks.
They consisted of two shirts and a half; two stocks for the neck; a pair or two of worsted stockings; an old pair of corduroy small- clothes; a rusty razor; a book of psalm tunes full of dog's-ears; and a broken pitch-pipe.
People in Nantucket invest their money in whaling vessels, the same way that you do yours in approved state stocks bringing in good interest.
And if he is unpopular he can depend on DYING, right there in the stocks, can't he?
The stocks of goods in the shops were not extensive, generally.
This is one of the peculiarly dangerous months to speculate in stocks in.
I might have sold it again, the next day, for more than I gave: but, with regard to the purchase-money, I might have been very unfortunate indeed; for the stocks were at that time so low, that if I had not happened to have the necessary sum in my banker's hands, I must have sold out to very great loss.
Again I reflected: I scarcely knew what school was: Bessie sometimes spoke of it as a place where young ladies sat in the stocks, wore backboards, and were expected to be exceedingly genteel and precise: John Reed hated his school, and abused his master; but John Reed's tastes were no rule for mine, and if Bessie's accounts of school-discipline (gathered from the young ladies of a family where she had lived before coming to Gateshead) were somewhat appalling, her details of certain accomplishments attained by these same young ladies were, I thought, equally attractive.
And I noticed another, by the aid of my nostrils; a fragrance of stocks and wallflowers wafted on the air from amongst the homely fruit- trees.
What are my agony and indignation next day, when I hear a flying rumour that the Misses Nettingall have stood Miss Shepherd in the stocks for turning in her toes!