stoke


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

stoke

 (stōk)
v. stoked, stok·ing, stokes
v.tr.
1. To stir up and feed (a fire or furnace).
2. To feed fuel to and tend the fire of (a furnace).
v.intr.
1. To feed or tend a furnace or fire.
2. Informal To eat steadily and in large quantities.

[Back-formation from stoker.]

stoke

(stəʊk)
vb
1. to feed, stir, and tend (a fire, furnace, etc)
2. (tr) to tend the furnace of; act as a stoker for
[C17: back formation from stoker]

stoke

(stoʊk)

v. stoked, stok•ing. v.t.
1. to poke, stir up, and feed (a fire).
2. to tend the fire of (a furnace); supply with fuel.
v.i.
3. to shake up the coals of a fire.
4. to tend a fire or furnace.
[1675–85; < Dutch stoken to feed or stock a fire; see stock]

stoke


Past participle: stoked
Gerund: stoking

Imperative
stoke
stoke
Present
I stoke
you stoke
he/she/it stokes
we stoke
you stoke
they stoke
Preterite
I stoked
you stoked
he/she/it stoked
we stoked
you stoked
they stoked
Present Continuous
I am stoking
you are stoking
he/she/it is stoking
we are stoking
you are stoking
they are stoking
Present Perfect
I have stoked
you have stoked
he/she/it has stoked
we have stoked
you have stoked
they have stoked
Past Continuous
I was stoking
you were stoking
he/she/it was stoking
we were stoking
you were stoking
they were stoking
Past Perfect
I had stoked
you had stoked
he/she/it had stoked
we had stoked
you had stoked
they had stoked
Future
I will stoke
you will stoke
he/she/it will stoke
we will stoke
you will stoke
they will stoke
Future Perfect
I will have stoked
you will have stoked
he/she/it will have stoked
we will have stoked
you will have stoked
they will have stoked
Future Continuous
I will be stoking
you will be stoking
he/she/it will be stoking
we will be stoking
you will be stoking
they will be stoking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stoking
you have been stoking
he/she/it has been stoking
we have been stoking
you have been stoking
they have been stoking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stoking
you will have been stoking
he/she/it will have been stoking
we will have been stoking
you will have been stoking
they will have been stoking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stoking
you had been stoking
he/she/it had been stoking
we had been stoking
you had been stoking
they had been stoking
Conditional
I would stoke
you would stoke
he/she/it would stoke
we would stoke
you would stoke
they would stoke
Past Conditional
I would have stoked
you would have stoked
he/she/it would have stoked
we would have stoked
you would have stoked
they would have stoked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.stoke - stir up or tend; of a fire
tend - manage or run; "tend a store"

stoke

verb fuel, rekindle, add fuel to, tend, keep burning She was stoking the fire with sticks of maple.
Translations
يُزَوِّد بالوَقود
přiložit
komme brændsel på
bæta á
kūrikaskurstyti ugnį
piepildīt ar kurināmo
ateşe kömür/yakıt atmak

stoke

[stəʊk] VT (also stoke up)
1. [+ fire, furnace] → atizar
2. (fig) [+ fears, hopes] → cebar
stoke up
A. VI + ADV (lit) → cebar el hogar, echar carbón a la lumbre (= eat) → atiborrarse
B. VT + ADV = stoke

stoke

[ˈstəʊk] vt
[+ fire, furnace] → alimenter
[+ fears, interest] → alimenter
stoke up
vt sep
[+ fire, furnace] → alimenter
[+ fears, interest] → alimenter

stoke

vt furnace(be)heizen, beschicken (spec); fireschüren; (fig) inflation, fears, conflict, speculationanheizen, schüren

stoke

:
stokehold
n (Naut) → Heizraum m
stokehole
n
(Naut) → Heizraum m
(in furnace) → Schürloch nt

stoke

[stəʊk] vt (also stoke up) (fire) → attizzare; (furnace) → alimentare

stoke

(stəuk) verb
to put coal or other fuel on (a fire) eg in the furnace of a boiler etc. The men stoked the furnaces.
ˈstoker noun
stoke up
to stoke. Have they stoked up (the fires)?
References in classic literature ?
Haye Park might do," said she, "if the Gouldings could quit it-- or the great house at Stoke, if the drawing-room were larger; but Ashworth is too far off
Tom Oliver is a very clever fellow, and Charles Maddox is as gentlemanlike a man as you will see anywhere, so I will take my horse early to-morrow morning and ride over to Stoke, and settle with one of them.
Of all these varied cases, however, I cannot recall any which presented more singular features than that which was associated with the well-known Surrey family of the Roylotts of Stoke Moran.
My name is Helen Stoner, and I am living with my stepfather, who is the last survivor of one of the oldest Saxon families in England, the Roylotts of Stoke Moran, on the western border of Surrey.
Roylott then abandoned his attempts to establish himself in practice in London and took us to live with him in the old ancestral house at Stoke Moran.
Instead of making friends and exchanging visits with our neighbours, who had at first been overjoyed to see a Roylott of Stoke Moran back in the old family seat, he shut himself up in his house and seldom came out save to indulge in ferocious quarrels with whoever might cross his path.
If we were to come to Stoke Moran to-day, would it be possible for us to see over these rooms without the knowledge of your stepfather?
Wait,' said he, 'I will just stoke up the fire a little for you.
When old Mr Simon Stoke, latterly deceased, had made his fortune as an honest merchant (some said money-lender) in the North, he decided to settle as a county man in the South of England, out of hail of his business district; and in doing this he felt the necessity of recommencing with a name that would not too readily identify him with the smart tradesman of the past, and that would be less commonplace than the original bald stark words.
Now there had been great doings that morning, for a certain yeoman named Egbert, who came from Stoke over in Staffordshire, had thrown with ease all those that came against him; but a man of Denby, well known through all the countryside as William of the Scar, had been biding his time with the Stoke man; so, when Egbert had thrown everyone else, stout William leaped into the ring.
Stokes told me, that he one day saw through a glass a herd of these animals which evidently had been frightened, and were running away at full speed, although their distance was so great that he could not distinguish them with his naked eye.
Stokes was a communicative person, and quickly told all she knew about Mr.