stoker


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stok·er

 (stō′kər)
n.
1. One who is employed to feed fuel to and tend a furnace, as on a steam locomotive or a steamship.
2. A mechanical device for feeding coal to a furnace.

[Dutch, from stoken, to stoke, from Middle Dutch stōken, to poke.]

stoker

(ˈstəʊkə)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a person employed to tend a furnace, as on a steamship
[C17: from Dutch, from stoken to stoke]

Stoker

(ˈstəʊkə)
n
(Biography) Bram, original name Abraham Stoker. 1847–1912, Irish novelist, author of Dracula (1897)

stok•er

(ˈstoʊ kər)

n.
1. a laborer employed to tend and fuel a furnace, esp. a furnace that generates steam, as on a steamship.
2. a mechanical device for supplying coal or other solid fuel to a furnace.
[1650–60; < Dutch, =stok(en) to stoke + -er -er1]
stok′er•less, adj.

Sto•ker

(ˈstoʊ kər)

n.
Bram (Abraham Stoker), 1847–1912, British novelist, born in Ireland: creator of Dracula.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Stoker - Irish writer of the horror novel about Dracula (1847-1912)
2.stoker - a laborer who tends fires (as on a coal-fired train or steamship)
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
3.stoker - a mechanical device for stoking a furnace
mechanical device - mechanism consisting of a device that works on mechanical principles
Translations
وَقّاد، موقِد السَّفينَه
topičpřikládač
fyrbøder
fûtõfûtõberendezéskazánfûtõ
kyndari
kurič
ateşci

stoker

[ˈstəʊkəʳ] Nfogonero m

stoker

[ˈstəʊkər] n (RAILWAYS, NAUTICAL, NAVAL)chauffeur/euse m/f

stoker

nHeizer(in) m(f); (= device)Beschickungsanlage f

stoker

[ˈstəʊkəʳ] nfuochista m

stoke

(stəuk) verb
to put coal or other fuel on (a fire) eg in the furnace of a boiler etc. The men stoked the furnaces.
ˈstoker noun
stoke up
to stoke. Have they stoked up (the fires)?
References in classic literature ?
The Indians had first mounted the engine, and half stunned the engineer and stoker with blows from their muskets.
Machinery must work for us in coal mines, and do all sanitary services, and be the stoker of steamers, and clean the streets, and run messages on wet days, and do anything that is tedious or distressing.
Strickland had no papers, but that was not a matter to disconcert Tough Bill when he saw a profit (he took the first month's wages of the sailor for whom he found a berth), and he provided Strickland with those of an English stoker who had providentially died on his hands.
There are five of you, all told, on board,--driver, stoker, guard, saloon attendant, and yourself.
The engine was manned by a driver and a stoker, and bore, by special favor, the Hon.
The engine-driver and stoker are both alive," the porter told him.
Standing on this were the Tartarean shapes of the pagan harpooneers, always the whale-ship's stokers.
At this cry the whole ship's crew hurried towards the harpooner-- commander, officers, masters, sailors, cabin boys; even the engineers left their engines, and the stokers their furnaces.
And as the day advanced and the engine drivers and stokers refused to return to London, the pressure of the flight drove the people in an ever-thickening multitude away from the stations and along the northward-running roads.
Beneath them, on the main deck, two Chinese stokers were carrying breakfast for'ard across the rusty iron plates that told their own grim story of weight and wash of sea.
We were all eager by this time, even the policemen and stokers, who had a very vague idea of what was going forward.
Attracted by the high pay and considerable bounties offered by the Gun Club, he had enlisted a choice legion of stokers, iron-founders, lime-burners, miners, brickmakers, and artisans of every trade, without distinction of color.