stolen


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sto·len

 (stō′lən)
v.
Past participle of steal.

stolen

(ˈstəʊlən)
vb
the past participle of steal

steal

(stil)

v. stole, sto•len, steal•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to take (the property of another or others) without permission or right, esp. secretly or by force.
2. to appropriate (ideas, credit, words, etc.) without right or acknowledgment.
3. to take, get, or win insidiously, surreptitiously, subtly, or by chance: He stole my girlfriend.
4. to move, bring, convey, or put secretly or quietly; smuggle: She stole the dog upstairs at bedtime.
5. Baseball. (of a base runner) to reach (a base) safely by running while the ball is being pitched to the player at bat.
v.i.
6. to commit or practice theft.
7. to move, go, or come secretly, quietly, or unobserved: to steal out of a room.
8. to pass, happen, etc., imperceptibly, gently, or gradually: The years steal by.
9. Baseball. (of a base runner) to advance a base by running to it while the ball is being pitched to the player at bat.
n.
10. an act of stealing; theft.
11. the thing stolen.
12. something acquired at a cost far below its real value; bargain.
13. Baseball. the act of advancing a base by stealing.
Idioms:
1. steal a march on, to gain an advantage over, as by stealth.
2. steal someone's thunder,
a. to accept credit for another's work.
b. to detract from another's achievement by some action that anticipates or overshadows it.
3. steal the show,
a. to usurp the credit for something.
b. to be more outstanding than anyone or anything else.
[before 900; Middle English stelen, Old English stelan, c. Old Frisian, Old Norse stela, Old High German stelan, Gothic stilan]
steal′a•ble, adj.
steal′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

stolen

adjective hot (slang), bent (slang), knockoff (informal), hooky (slang), off the back of a lorry (Brit. informal) dealing in stolen goods
Translations

stolen

[ˈstəʊlən]
A. PP of steal
B. ADJ
1. (lit) → robado
stolen goodsartículos mpl robados
stolen propertybienes mpl robados
see also dealer
2. (fig) [moment, pleasures, kisses] → robado

stolen

[ˈstəʊlən]
pp of steal
adjvolé(e)

stolen

ptp of steal
adjgestohlen; pleasuresheimlich; stolen goodsgestohlene Waren pl, → Diebesgut nt; to receive stolen goodsHehler msein; he was charged with receiving stolen goodser wurde wegen Hehlerei angeklagt or der Hehlerei bezichtigt
References in classic literature ?
She answered, "I'll take it," and it was cut off and paid for, and Sallie had exulted, and she had laughed as if it were a thing of no consequence, and driven away, feeling as if she had stolen something, and the police were after her.
I may have stolen a great sum of money or been involved in a murder before I came here.
As long as it was only stolen there was a chance to get it back, but if it's burned, the jig is up.
This sign, intended for those that might follow, was observed by one of her conductors, who restored the glove, broke the remaining branches of the bush in such a manner that it appeared to proceed from the struggling of some beast in its branches, and then laid his hand on his tomahawk, with a look so significant, that it put an effectual end to these stolen memorials of their passage.
And we have stolen upon Miss Hepzibah Pyncheon, too irreverently, at the instant of time when the patrician lady is to be transformed into the plebeian woman.
It may be that his pathway through life was haunted thus by a spectre that had stolen out from among his thoughts.
We had been, collectively, subject to an intrusion; some unscrupulous traveler, curious in old houses, had made his way in unobserved, enjoyed the prospect from the best point of view, and then stolen out as he came.
Then come out those fiery effulgences, infernally superb; then the evil-blazing diamond, once the divinest symbol of the crystal skies, looks like some crown-jewel stolen from the King of Hell.
One of them had been stolen long ago, and not a month passed that some one did not try to steal another.
The Lord hath ordered it so that never hath a fugitive been stolen from our village.
I, who cannot stay in my chamber for a single day without acquiring some rust, and when sometimes I have stolen forth for a walk at the eleventh hour, or four o'clock in the afternoon, too late to redeem the day, when the shades of night were already beginning to be mingled with the daylight, have felt as if I had committed some sin to be atoned for,--I confess that I am astonished at the power of endurance, to say nothing of the moral insensibility, of my neighbors who confine themselves to shops and offices the whole day for weeks and months, aye, and years almost together.
My pipe was ready and would have been lit, if I had not been lost in thinking about how to banish oppression from this land and restore to all its people their stolen rights and manhood without disobliging anybody.