stomack

stomack

(ˈstʌmək)
n
(Physiology) have a stomack informal E African to be pregnant
References in periodicals archive ?
And when the body is once tender and feeble, the stomack and Spirit must needes bear a great deale the weaker.
Hall repeatedly asserts the masculine nature of Margaret's character: a "manly woman, using to rule and not to be ruled" (Bullough 176); she "excelled all other, as well in beauty and favor, as in wit and pollicie, and was of stomack and corage, more like to a man, then a woman" (102).
errores ortograficos de Nabokov ("el manuscrito de Nabokov --con su robusta caligrafia y su fragil ortografia: bycile, stomack, suprize") y finaliza con lo que parece un veredicto inapelable: "En otras palabras, Laura queda entre una larva y una pupa (para usar una metafora lepidopterica) y muy lejos de la acabada imago.
11) Good for the stomack (H93: 194) 12) Ill for the sight (R: f.
A police spokesman said the Palestinian was wounded in the stomack.
85) Whereas Preston and Sibbes delighted in the duty-promoting passage of the Spirit from Christic head to sanctified member, Crisp was ever aware of the latter's debility and corruption: he fixed his revulsion on the flesh that, "like the Vipers stomack, .
In 1605, Charles de Rochefort wrote in his "Histoire Naturelle et Morale des Iles Antilles de l'Amerique" that pineapple juice "admirably recreates and exhilarates the Spirits and comfort[s] the Heart; it also fortifies the Stomack, cureth quesiness and causeth Appetite" (J.
My stomack was being gnawed alternately by little grunts of emptiness and uneasiness.
11) "And there is prickinge that brenneth in the stomack [by hote smoke], wlatsommes with colerik spewinge, dryenes of the tongue by hote smoke that dryeth the arteries that hatte tracchea, and the tonge" (On the Properties of Things, John Trevisa's Translation of Bartholomaeus Anglicus De Proprietatibus Rerum, A Critical Text, C.
But "the snake in my stomack lifts its head to my mouth at the sound of running water .
Edmunds, while Elizabeth, the 11-year-old, though in the court, "could not speak one word all the time, and for the most part she remained as one wholly senseless, [and] lay upon cushions in the court upon her back, her stomack and belly by the drawing of her breath, would arise to a great height.
And later that century, it was advertised in the London Publick Adviser as "a very wholesome and Physical drink" that "closes the Orifice of the Stomack, fortifies the heat within, helpeth Digestion, quickeneth the Spirits, maketh the heart lightsom, is good against Eye-Sores, Coughs, or Colds, Rhumes, Consumption, Head-ach, Dropsie, Gout, Scurvy, King's Evil, and many others.