stone's throw


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Related to stone's throw: stone's throw away

stone's throw

(stōnz)
n.
A short distance.

stone's throw

n
a short distance. Also called: stonecast

stone's′ throw′


n.
a short distance.
[1575–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stone's throw - a short distance; "it's only a step to the drugstore"
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude
References in classic literature ?
Everyone got up and began watching the movements of our troops below, as plainly visible as if but a stone's throw away, and the movements of the approaching enemy farther off.
The Vicar of Surle, a tiny hamlet by the sea, was to be seen every evening in the public house a stone's throw from his vicarage; and the churchwardens had been to Mr.
At a distance of a quarter-mile before him, but apparently at a stone's throw, rose from its fringe of pines the gigantic face of rock, towering to so great a height above him that it made him giddy to look up to where its edge cut a sharp, rugged line against the sky.
For twenty long minutes the blood-curdling cries continued, until they seemed but a stone's throw from the palisade.
It was in a back-street off an alley, and although within a stone's throw of Lothbury its immediate surroundings were not exhilarating.
You could never have guessed that within a stone's throw there was an open sheet of water and big ships lying afloat.
It was a moment of anxiety, for the Ghost was rushing directly upon the beach, a stone's throw distant.
A butcher hard by in the village, and the parsonage-house within a stone's throw.
They are almost within a stone's throw of Martin, who is pressing the unlucky chase hard, when Tom catches sight of them, and sings out, "Louts, 'ware louts, your side
On one occasion I saw two of these monsters, probably male and female, slowly swimming one after the other, within less than a stone's throw of the shore, over which the beech-tree extended its branches.
It seemed incredible that such a thing could be, almost within a stone's throw of the spot where but a brief two centuries before had stood the greatest city of the world.
There was, and still is, an inn within a stone's throw of the great iron gates, with two very old lime trees in front of it, where we used to lunch on our arrival at a little table spread with a red and blue check cloth, the lime blossoms dropping into our soup, and the bees humming in the scented shadows overhead.