stood


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Related to stood: stood down, stood the test of time

stood

 (sto͝od)
v.
Past tense and past participle of stand.

stood

(stʊd)
vb
the past tense and past participle of stand

stand

(stænd)

v. stood, stand•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to be in an upright position on the feet.
2. to rise to one's feet (often fol. by up).
3. to have a specified height when in this position: He stands six feet.
4. to remain motionless on the feet.
5. to take a position as indicated: to stand aside.
6. to adhere to a certain policy or attitude: We stand for free trade.
7. (of things) to rest in an upright or vertical position.
8. to be located or situated: The building stands upon the hill.
9. (of an account, score, etc.) to remain as indicated: The score stands 18 to 14.
10. to continue in force; remain valid: My offer still stands.
11. to be or remain in a specified state or condition: I stand corrected. You stand in danger of losing your license.
12. Chiefly Brit. to be a candidate, as for public office: to stand for Parliament.
13. to take or hold a particular course at sea.
14. (of a male domestic animal) to be available as a sire, usu. for a fee.
v.t.
15. to cause to stand; set upright.
16. to undergo or submit to: to stand trial.
17. to endure or withstand: My eyes can't stand the glare.
18. to treat (a person) to something.
19. to perform one's job or duty as: to stand watch aboard ship.
20. stand by,
a. to uphold; support.
b. to adhere to; remain firm regarding.
c. to wait, esp. in anticipation.
d. to be ready to board transport as an alternate passenger.
21. stand down,
a. Law. to leave the witness stand.
b. to step aside; withdraw, as from a competition.
22. stand for,
a. to represent; symbolize: P.S. stands for “postscript.”
b. to advocate; favor.
c. to tolerate; allow.
23. stand off,
a. to keep or stay at a distance.
b. to put off; evade.
24. stand on, to be based on; depend on; rest on.
25. stand out,
a. to project; protrude.
b. to be conspicuous or prominent.
26. stand over,
a. to supervise constantly.
b. to postpone or be postponed.
27. stand up,
a. to be or remain convincing: The evidence won't stand up in court.
b. to be durable or serviceable: Wool stands up better than silk.
c. to fail to keep an appointment with.
28. stand up for,
a. to defend; support.
b. to serve (a bridegroom) as best man or (a bride) as maid or matron of honor.
29. stand up to, to encounter fearlessly; confront.
n.
30. the act of standing.
31. a halt or stop.
32. a final defensive effort: Custer's last stand.
33. a determined policy, position, attitude, etc., taken or maintained: We must take a stand on political issues.
35. a raised platform, as for a speaker, a band, or the like.
36. stands, a raised section of seats for spectators; grandstand.
37. a framework on or in which articles are placed for support, exhibition, etc.: a wig stand.
38. a piece of furniture of various forms, on or in which to put articles (often used in combination): an umbrella stand; a washstand.
39. a small, light table.
40. a stall, booth, or the like, where articles are displayed for sale: a fruit stand.
42. a site or location for business.
43. a place or station occupied by vehicles available for hire: a taxi stand.
44. a standing growth of trees.
45. a stop on the tour of a theatrical company, rock group, etc., esp. for a single performance.
Idioms:
1. stand firm, to remain steadfast.
2. stand to reason, to be obvious, logical, or reasonable.
[before 900; Middle English (v.), Old English standan, c. Old Norse standa, Gothic standan, Old High German stantan, akin to Latin stāre to stand, sistere, Greek histánai to make stand, Skt sthā to stand]
syn: See bear1.
Translations

stand

(stӕnd) past tense, past participle stood (stud) verb
1. to be in an upright position, not sitting or lying. His leg was so painful that he could hardly stand; After the storm, few trees were left standing.
2. (often with up) to rise to the feet. He pushed back his chair and stood up; Some people like to stand (up) when the National Anthem is played.
3. to remain motionless. The train stood for an hour outside Newcastle.
4. to remain unchanged. This law still stands.
5. to be in or have a particular place. There is now a factory where our house once stood.
6. to be in a particular state, condition or situation. As matters stand, we can do nothing to help; How do you stand financially?
7. to accept or offer oneself for a particular position etc. He is standing as Parliamentary candidate for our district.
8. to put in a particular position, especially upright. He picked up the fallen chair and stood it beside the table.
9. to undergo or endure. He will stand (his) trial for murder; I can't stand her rudeness any longer.
10. to pay for (a meal etc) for (a person). Let me stand you a drink!
noun
1. a position or place in which to stand ready to fight etc, or an act of fighting etc. The guard took up his stand at the gate; I shall make a stand for what I believe is right.
2. an object, especially a piece of furniture, for holding or supporting something. a coat-stand; The sculpture had been removed from its stand for cleaning.
3. a stall where goods are displayed for sale or advertisement.
4. a large structure beside a football pitch, race course etc with rows of seats for spectators. The stand was crowded.
5. (American) a witness box in a law court.
take the stand
to come and sit in the witness box in order to testify. The witness was asked to take the stand.
ˈstanding adjective
permanent. The general's standing orders must be obeyed.
noun
1. time of lasting. an agreement of long standing.
2. rank or reputation. a diplomat of high standing.
ˈstand-byplural ˈstand-bys noun
1. readiness for action. Two fire-engines went directly to the fire, and a third was on stand-by (= ready to go if ordered).
2. something that can be used in an emergency etc. Fruit is a good stand-by when children get hungry between meals.
adjective
(of an airline passenger or ticket) costing or paying less than the usual fare, as the passenger does not book a seat for a particular flight, but waits for the first available seat.
adverb
travelling in this way. It costs a lot less to travel stand-by.
ˈstand-in noun
a person who takes someone else's job etc for a temporary period, especially in making films.
ˈstanding-room noun
space for standing only, not sitting. There was standing-room only on the bus.
make someone's hair stand on end
to frighten someone very greatly. The horrible scream made his hair stand on end.
stand aside
to move to one side or withdraw out of someone's way. He stood aside to let me pass.
stand back
to move backwards or away. A crowd gathered round the injured man, but a policeman ordered everyone to stand back.
stand by
1. to watch something happening without doing anything. I couldn't just stand by while he was hitting the child.
2. to be ready to act. The police are standing by in case of trouble.
3. to support; to stay loyal to. She stood by him throughout his trial.
stand down
to withdraw eg from a contest.
stand fast/firm
to refuse to yield.
stand for
1. to be a candidate for election to. He stood for Parliament.
2. to be an abbreviation for. HQ stands for Headquarters.
3. to represent. I like to think that our school stands for all that is best in education.
4. to tolerate. I won't stand for this sort of behaviour.
stand in
to take another person's place, job etc for a time. The leading actor was ill and another actor stood in for him.
stand on one's own (two) feet
to manage one's own affairs without help.
stand out
1. to be noticeable. She stood out as one of the prettiest girls in the school.
2. to go on resisting or to refuse to yield. The garrison stood out (against the besieging army) as long as possible.
stand over
to supervise closely. I have to stand over him to make him do his schoolwork.
stand up for
to support or defend. She stood up for him when the others bullied him.
stand up to
to show resistance to. He stood up to the bigger boys who tried to bully him; These chairs have stood up to very hard use.

stood

pret & pp de stand
References in classic literature ?
Not a very splendid show, but there was a great deal of love done up in the few little bundles, and the tall vase of red roses, white chrysanthemums, and trailing vines, which stood in the middle, gave quite an elegant air to the table.
UPON THE HALF decayed veranda of a small frame house that stood near the edge of a ravine near the town of Winesburg, Ohio, a fat little old man walked nervously up and down.
By the Indian's side, and evidently sustaining a companionship with him, stood a white man, clad in a strange disarray of civilized and savage costume.
When Captain Sleet in person stood his mast-head in this crow's nest of his, he tells us that he always had a rifle with him (also fixed in the rack), together with a powder flask and shot, for the purpose of popping off the stray narwhales, or vagrant sea unicorns infesting those waters; for you cannot successfully shoot at them from the deck owing to the resistance of the water, but to shoot down upon them is a very different thing.
I stood under an oak tree and watched, but no one came to catch me.
Then quite a group of boys and girls -- playmates of Tom's and Joe's -- came by, and stood looking over the paling fence and talking in reverent tones of how Tom did so-and-so the last time they saw him, and how Joe said this and that small trifle (pregnant with awful prophecy, as they could easily see now
More than once Dickon paused in what he was doing and stood still with a sort of growing wonder in his eyes, shaking his head softly.
Lorry, who had stood up to look for him, and who quietly nodded and sat down again.
On they came in silence broken only by the patter of their feet and the dry rattling of their bony necklets, till they stood in long ranks before the Black One.
So spake the Sovran voice, and Clouds began To darken all the Hill, and smoak to rowl In duskie wreathes, reluctant flames, the signe Of wrauth awak't: nor with less dread the loud Ethereal Trumpet from on high gan blow: At which command the Powers Militant, That stood for Heav'n, in mighty Quadrate joyn'd Of Union irresistible, mov'd on In silence thir bright Legions, to the sound Of instrumental Harmonie that breath'd Heroic Ardor to advent'rous deeds Under thir God-like Leaders, in the Cause Of God and his MESSIAH.
The crowd about the pit had increased, and stood out black against the lemon yellow of the sky--a couple of hundred people, perhaps.
She sold all her property excepting the farm of Toucques and the farm of Geffosses, the income of which barely amounted to 5,000 francs; then she left her house in Saint-Melaine, and moved into a less pretentious one which had belonged to her ancestors and stood back of the market-place.