stoop


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stoop 1

 (sto͞op)
v. stooped, stoop·ing, stoops
v.intr.
1. To bend forward and down from the waist or the middle of the back: had to stoop in order to fit into the cave.
2. To stand or walk, especially habitually, with the head and upper back bent forward.
3.
a. To lower or debase oneself: I wouldn't stoop to such behavior.
b. To descend from a superior social position; condescend: Would the prince stoop to have a meal with peasants?
4. To swoop down, as a bird in pursuing its prey.
v.tr.
1. To bend (oneself, the head, or the body) forward and down.
2. To debase; humble: stooped himself to such disgraceful acts.
n.
1. The act of stooping.
2. A forward bending of the head and upper back, especially when habitual: walked with a stoop.
3. An act of self-abasement or condescension.
4. A descent, as of a bird of prey.

[Middle English stoupen, from Old English stūpian.]
Synonyms: stoop1, condescend, deign
These verbs mean to descend to a level considered inappropriate to one's dignity: stooped to contemptible methods to realize their ambitions; won't condescend to acknowledge his rival's greeting; didn't even deign to reply.

stoop 2

 (sto͞op)
n.
A small porch, platform, or staircase leading to the entrance of a house or building.

[Dutch stoep, front veranda, from Middle Dutch.]

stoop 3

 (sto͞op)
n.
Variant of stoup.

stoop

(stuːp)
vb (mainly intr)
1. (also tr) to bend (the body or the top half of the body) forward and downward
2. to carry oneself with head and shoulders habitually bent forward
3. (often foll by to) to abase or degrade oneself
4. (often foll by to) to condescend; deign
5. (Zoology) (of a bird of prey) to swoop down
6. archaic to give in
n
7. the act, position, or characteristic of stooping
8. a lowering from a position of dignity or superiority
9. (Zoology) a downward swoop, esp of a bird of prey
[Old English stūpan; related to Middle Dutch stupen to bow, Old Norse stūpa, Norwegian stupa to fall; see steep1]
ˈstooper n
ˈstooping adj
ˈstoopingly adv

stoop

(stuːp)
n
(Architecture) US and Canadian a small platform with steps up to it at the entrance to a building
[C18: from Dutch stoep, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German stuofa stair, Old English stōpel footprint; see step]

stoop

(stuːp)
n
archaic a pillar or post
[C15: variant of dialect stulpe, probably from Old Norse stolpe; see stele]

stoop

(stuːp)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a less common spelling of stoup

stoop1

(stup)

v.i.
1. to bend the head and shoulders, or the body generally, forward and downward from an erect position.
2. to carry the head and shoulders habitually bowed forward.
3. to descend from one's level of dignity; condescend; deign.
4. to swoop down, as a hawk at prey.
5. to submit; yield.
v.t.
6. to bend (oneself, one's head, etc.) forward and downward.
7. Archaic. to abase, humble, or subdue.
n.
8. an act or instance of stooping.
9. a stooping position or carriage of the body.
10. a descent from dignity or superiority.
11. a downward swoop, as of a hawk.
[before 900; Middle English stoupen (v.), Old English stūpian, c. Middle Dutch stūpen to bend, bow; akin to steep1]

stoop2

(stup)

n.
a raised platform or porch, esp. a small porch with steps, at the entrance of a house.
[1745–55, Amer.; < Dutch stoep]

stoop3

(stup)

n.

stoop


Past participle: stooped
Gerund: stooping

Imperative
stoop
stoop
Present
I stoop
you stoop
he/she/it stoops
we stoop
you stoop
they stoop
Preterite
I stooped
you stooped
he/she/it stooped
we stooped
you stooped
they stooped
Present Continuous
I am stooping
you are stooping
he/she/it is stooping
we are stooping
you are stooping
they are stooping
Present Perfect
I have stooped
you have stooped
he/she/it has stooped
we have stooped
you have stooped
they have stooped
Past Continuous
I was stooping
you were stooping
he/she/it was stooping
we were stooping
you were stooping
they were stooping
Past Perfect
I had stooped
you had stooped
he/she/it had stooped
we had stooped
you had stooped
they had stooped
Future
I will stoop
you will stoop
he/she/it will stoop
we will stoop
you will stoop
they will stoop
Future Perfect
I will have stooped
you will have stooped
he/she/it will have stooped
we will have stooped
you will have stooped
they will have stooped
Future Continuous
I will be stooping
you will be stooping
he/she/it will be stooping
we will be stooping
you will be stooping
they will be stooping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been stooping
you have been stooping
he/she/it has been stooping
we have been stooping
you have been stooping
they have been stooping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been stooping
you will have been stooping
he/she/it will have been stooping
we will have been stooping
you will have been stooping
they will have been stooping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been stooping
you had been stooping
he/she/it had been stooping
we had been stooping
you had been stooping
they had been stooping
Conditional
I would stoop
you would stoop
he/she/it would stoop
we would stoop
you would stoop
they would stoop
Past Conditional
I would have stooped
you would have stooped
he/she/it would have stooped
we would have stooped
you would have stooped
they would have stooped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoop - an inclination of the top half of the body forward and downwardstoop - an inclination of the top half of the body forward and downward
inclining, inclination - the act of inclining; bending forward; "an inclination of his head indicated his agreement"
2.stoop - basin for holy water
basin - a bowl-shaped vessel; usually used for holding food or liquids; "she mixed the dough in a large basin"
3.stoop - small porch or set of steps at the front entrance of a house
porch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
Verb1.stoop - bend one's back forward from the waist on downstoop - bend one's back forward from the waist on down; "he crouched down"; "She bowed before the Queen"; "The young man stooped to pick up the girl's purse"
bend, flex - form a curve; "The stick does not bend"
squinch - crouch down
cower, huddle - crouch or curl up; "They huddled outside in the rain"
stoop to - make concessions to
2.stoop - debase oneself morally, act in an undignified, unworthy, or dishonorable way; "I won't stoop to reading other people's mail"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
3.stoop - descend swiftly, as if on prey; "The eagle stooped on the mice in the field"
pounce, swoop - move down on as if in an attack; "The raptor swooped down on its prey"; "The teacher swooped down upon the new students"
4.stoop - sag, bend, bend over or down; "the rocks stooped down over the hiking path"
slope, incline, pitch - be at an angle; "The terrain sloped down"
5.stoop - carry oneself, often habitually, with head, shoulders, and upper back bent forward; "The old man was stooping but he could walk around without a cane"
carry, bear, hold - support or hold in a certain manner; "She holds her head high"; "He carried himself upright"

stoop

verb
1. hunch, walk with a stoop, be bowed or round-shouldered She was taller than he was and stooped slightly.
2. bend, lean, bow, duck, descend, incline, kneel, crouch, squat He stooped to pick up the carrier bag of groceries.
noun
1. slouch, slump, droop, sag, bad posture, round-shoulderedness He was a tall, thin fellow with a slight stoop.
stoop to something resort to, sink to, descend to, deign to, condescend to, demean yourself by, lower yourself by How could anyone stoop to doing such a thing?

stoop

verb
1. To incline the body:
2. To bring oneself down to a lower level of behavior:
3. To descend to a level considered inappropriate to one's dignity:
Translations
إنْحِناء، تَنازُل، إنْحِدار المُسْتَوىيَنْحَني
ohnutá zádasehnoutsnížit se
bukke sigrundryggethed
görbe hátgörnyedlehajolmeggörnyedés
leggjast svo lágt aîlotlúta, halla sér fram
nulenktinusilenktinusižemintipakumpimaspaminti savo principus
kūkumsnoliektiespazemoties līdzpieliekties
ohnutý chrbát
skloniti se
eğilmekkamburunu çıkarmatenezzül etmek

stoop

1 [stuːp]
A. N to have a stoopser un poco encorvado
to walk with a stoopandar encorvado
B. VI
1. (= bend) (also stoop down) → inclinarse, agacharse; (permanently, as defect) → andar encorvado
to stoop to pick sth upinclinarse para recoger algo
2. (fig) to stoop to sth/doing sthrebajarse a algo/hacer algo
I wouldn't stoop so low!¡a eso no llegaría!, ¡no me rebajaría tanto!

stoop

2 [stuːp] N (US) (= verandah) → pórtico m, pequeña veranda f

stoop

[ˈstuːp]
n
(= hunched shoulders) to have a stoop → être voûté(e)
(US) [house] → perron m
vi
(= have a stoop) → se voûter
(= bend) → se baisser
(= lower oneself) → s'abaisser
to stoop to sth → s'abaisser à qch
to stoop to doing sth → s'abaisser à faire qch

stoop

1
nGebeugtheit f; (= deformity)krummer Rücken, Buckel m; to walk with a stoopgebeugt gehen; to have a stoopeinen Buckel or einen krummen Rücken haben
vtbeugen; head (to avoid sth) → einziehen
visich beugen or neigen (→ over über +acc); (also stoop down)sich bücken; (= have a stoop, walk with a stoop)gebeugt gehen; stooping shoulderskrumme Schultern pl; to stoop to something (fig)sich zu etw herablassen or hergeben; to stoop to doing something (fig)sich dazu herablassen or hergeben, etw zu tun

stoop

2
n (US) → Treppe f

stoop

[stuːp]
1. n to have a stoopavere la schiena curva
to walk with a stoop → camminare curvo/a
2. vi
a. (bend) (also stoop down) → chinarsi, curvarsi, abbassarsi; (have a stoop) → essere curvo/a
b. (fig) to stoop to sth/doing sthabbassarsi a qc/a fare qc
I wouldn't stoop so low! → non mi abbasserei a tanto!

stoop

(stuːp) verb
1. to bend the body forward and downward. The doorway was so low that he had to stoop (his head) to go through it; She stooped down to talk to the child.
2. to lower one's (moral) standards by doing something. Surely he wouldn't stoop to cheating!
noun
a stooping position of the body, shoulder etc. Many people develop a stoop as they grow older.
stooped adjective
stooped shoulders; He is stooped with age.

stoop

vi (también to — over) agacharse, doblarse
References in classic literature ?
The o]d woman came out of her front door, dragging a chair, on which she coolly seated herself on the tiny stoop at the top of the steps.
The cares of a kingdom do not stoop the shoulders, they do not droop the chin, they do not depress the high level of the eye-glance, they do not put doubt and fear in the heart and hang out the signs of them in slouching body and unsure step.
The shoulders have known no ignobler burden than iron mail, and they will not stoop.
Oh, when shall I arrive again at my home, where I shall no longer have to stoop--shall no longer have to stoop BEFORE THE SMALL ONES
Her hair of the deepest brown, parted irregularly in the middle, flowed in natural ringlets over her shoulders, and whenever she chanced to stoop, fell over and hid from view her lovely bosom.
Certainly, who hath a state to repair, may not despise small things; and commonly it is less dishonorable, to abridge petty charges, than to stoop to petty gettings.
He dogged his master's heels whenever he left the cabin, and haunted the front stoop when he remained inside.
It's not set right; handle's too high; see how he has to stoop to it," said one.
The little piano is dumb night after night, its candles unlighted, and there is no one to play Chopin to us now as the day dies, and the shadows stoop out of their corners to listen in vain.
It's because he's wearing the Tried and Proven, and he knows that however far he stoops they won't break.
Officers said they believed the vehicles were travelling from Thirsk to Busby Stoop - and are appealing for anyone with information or dash-cam footage to get in touch.
BFF Gerald with an updated 'do is behind the surprise video, which starts with the cowardly Stoop Kid who never left his stoop because of deep-seated insecurities.