stoppage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

stop·page

 (stŏp′ĭj)
n.
The act of stopping or the condition of being stopped; a halt: called for a work stoppage.

stoppage

(ˈstɒpɪdʒ)
n
1. the act of stopping or the state of being stopped
2. something that stops or blocks
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a deduction of money, as from pay
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) an organized cessation of work, as during a strike

stop•page

(ˈstɒp ɪdʒ)

n.
1. an act or instance of stopping.
2. the state of being stopped or obstructed.
3. a cessation of activity, esp. work; strike.
[1400–50]

stoppage

  • armistice - Comes from Latin armistitium—from arma, "arms," and -stitium, "stoppage"—and means a temporary cessation from fighting or the use of arms, or a short truce.
  • solstice - Derived from the Latin sol, "Sun," and stitium, "stoppage," as the Sun appears to stand still on the first day of winter.
  • epoch - Pronounced EH-puhk, it is from Greek epokhe, "fixed point in time, stoppage," and it was first the initial point in a chronology from which succeeding years were numbered.
  • stasis - A period of inactivity or equilibrium, from Greek histanai, "stoppage."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stoppage - the state of inactivity following an interruptionstoppage - the state of inactivity following an interruption; "the negotiations were in arrest"; "held them in check"; "during the halt he got some lunch"; "the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow"; "he spent the entire stop in his seat"
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
countercheck - a check that restrains another check
logjam - any stoppage attributable to unusual activity; "the legislation ran into a logjam"
2.stoppage - an obstruction in a pipe or tubestoppage - an obstruction in a pipe or tube; "we had to call a plumber to clear out the blockage in the drainpipe"
breech closer, breechblock - a metal block in breech-loading firearms that is withdrawn to insert a cartridge and replaced to close the breech before firing
impedimenta, obstruction, obstructor, obstructer, impediment - any structure that makes progress difficult
plug, stopple, stopper - blockage consisting of an object designed to fill a hole tightly
vapor lock, vapour lock - a stoppage in a pipeline caused by gas bubbles (especially a stoppage that develops in hot weather in an internal-combustion engine when fuel in the gas line boils and forms bubbles that block the flow of gasoline to the carburetor)
3.stoppage - the act of stopping something; "the third baseman made some remarkable stops"; "his stoppage of the flow resulted in a flood"
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
standdown, stand-down - (military) a temporary stop of offensive military action
haemostasia, haemostasis, hemostasia, hemostasis - surgical procedure of stopping the flow of blood (as with a hemostat)

stoppage

noun
1. stopping, halt, standstill, close, arrest, lay-off, shutdown, cutoff, abeyance, discontinuance a seven-hour stoppage by air-traffic controllers
2. strike, industrial action, walkout, closure, shutdown Mineworkers have voted for a one-day stoppage next month.
3. blockage, obstruction, stopping up, occlusion The small traffic disturbance will soon grow into a complete stoppage.

stoppage

noun
2. The condition of being stopped:
3. A cessation of normal activity, caused by an accident or strike, for example:
Translations
تَوْقيف، إنْسِداد
přerušení
afbrydelsearbejdsstandsning
katkosseisokki
megállítás
stöîvun
durma

stoppage

[ˈstɒpɪdʒ]
A. N
1. [of work] → paro m, suspensión f; (= strike) → huelga f
2. [of pay] → suspensión f; (from wages) → deducción f
3. (Sport) → detención f
4. (in pipe etc) → obstrucción f
B. CPD stoppage time N (Sport) → tiempo m de descuento

stoppage

[ˈstɒpɪdʒ] n
(= strike) → arrêt m de travail
(mainly British) (SPORT)arrêts mpl de jeu
(= deduction) [pay] → retenue fstoppage time n (mainly British) (SPORT)arrêts mpl de jeu

stoppage

n
(in work, game) → Unterbrechung f; (in traffic) → Stockung f; (in production etc, temporary, because of mechanical problems) → Unterbrechung f; (for longer time, because of strike etc) → Stopp m; (= strike)Streik m; stoppage of workArbeitsniederlegung f
(of pay, leave, cheque)Sperrung f; (of delivery, supplies etc)Stopp m; (= deduction)Abzug m
(= blockage)Verstopfung f, → Stau m

stoppage

[ˈstɒpɪdʒ] n (in pipe) → ostruzione f; (of work) → interruzione f; (strike) → interruzione f del lavoro; (from wages) → detrazione f, trattenuta

stop

(stop) past tense, past participle stopped verb
1. to (make something) cease moving, or come to rest, a halt etc. He stopped the car and got out; This train does not stop at Birmingham; He stopped to look at the map; He signalled with his hand to stop the bus.
2. to prevent from doing something. We must stop him (from) going; I was going to say something rude but stopped myself just in time.
3. to discontinue or cease eg doing something. That woman just can't stop talking; The rain has stopped; It has stopped raining.
4. to block or close. He stopped his ears with his hands when she started to shout at him.
5. to close (a hole, eg on a flute) or press down (a string on a violin etc) in order to play a particular note.
6. to stay. Will you be stopping long at the hotel?
noun
1. an act of stopping or state of being stopped. We made only two stops on our journey; Work came to a stop for the day.
2. a place for eg a bus to stop. a bus stop.
3. in punctuation, a full stop. Put a stop at the end of the sentence.
4. a device on a flute etc for covering the holes in order to vary the pitch, or knobs for bringing certain pipes into use on an organ.
5. a device, eg a wedge etc, for stopping the movement of something, or for keeping it in a fixed position. a door-stop.
ˈstoppage (-pidʒ) noun
(an) act of stopping or state or process of being stopped. The building was at last completed after many delays and stoppages.
ˈstopper noun
an object, eg a cork, that is put into the neck of a bottle, jar, hole etc to close it.
ˈstopping noun
a filling in a tooth. One of my stoppings has come out.
ˈstopcock noun
a tap and valve for controlling flow of liquid through a pipe.
ˈstopgap noun
a person or thing that fills a gap in an emergency. He was made headmaster as a stopgap till a new man could be appointed; (also adjective) stopgap arrangements.
ˈstopwatch noun
a watch with a hand that can be stopped and started, used in timing a race etc.
put a stop to
to prevent from continuing. We must put a stop to this waste.
stop at nothing
to be willing to do anything, however dishonest etc, in order to get something. He'll stop at nothing to get what he wants.
stop dead
to stop completely. I stopped dead when I saw him.
stop off
to make a halt on a journey etc. We stopped off at Edinburgh to see the castle.
stop over to make a stay of a night or more: We're planning to stop over in Amsterdam ( noun ˈstop-over)
stop up
to block. Some rubbish got into the drain and stopped it up.

stoppage

n. bloqueo; obstrucción; taponamiento.
References in classic literature ?
After this little stoppage we were soon on our way to the hospital, going as much as possible through by-streets.
From one of these spells he was wakened by the stoppage of the cab; and, getting down, found himself in quite a country road, the last lamp of the suburb shining some way below, and the high walls of a garden rising before him in the dark.
But she had made a previous stoppage on the second floor and had silently pointed at a dark door there.
While the troops, dividing into two parts when passing around the Kremlin, were thronging the Moskva and the Stone bridges, a great many soldiers, taking advantage of the stoppage and congestion, turned back from the bridges and slipped stealthily and silently past the church of Vasili the Beatified and under the Borovitski gate, back up the hill to the Red Square where some instinct told them they could easily take things not belonging to them.
Brooke noddingly appealed to that motive, Sir James felt a sudden embarrassment; there was a stoppage in his throat; he even blushed.
The abrupt stoppage almost whipped us off into the water.
It was a stoppage of the south-east trade wind that made for variable weather, and that made cooking on the exposed deck galley a misery and sent the return boys, who had nothing to wet but their skins, scuttling below.
There has been a stoppage of the trades, and now it's howling right out of the trade quarter.
Start number three and stoppage number three, as Frank hailed them with the luncheon basket, which had been forgotten, after everyone had protested that it was safely in.
Her ladyship had received Blanche's written announcement of the sudden stoppage of the bridal tour; and had penned the answer to Sir Patrick--the receipt of which at Ham Farm has been already described.
Michel, supposing it to be roughly stopped, while still under its formidable initial speed, wished to know what the consequences of the stoppage would have been.
If you have ever lived with a clock afflicted with that perversity, you know how vexing it is--such a stoppage.