stopping


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Related to stopping: stopping potential, thought stopping

stop

 (stŏp)
v. stopped, stop·ping, stops
v.tr.
1. To close (an opening or hole) by covering, filling in, or plugging up: The tea leaves stopped the drain.
2. To constrict (an opening or orifice): My nose is stopped up.
3. To obstruct or block passage on (a road, for example).
4. To prevent the flow or passage of: stop supplies from getting through.
5.
a. To halt the motion or progress of: stopped me and asked directions.
b. To block or deflect (a blow, for example); parry or ward off.
c. To be or get in the way of (a bullet or other missile); be killed or wounded by.
6.
a. To cause to desist or to change a course of action: The rain stopped us from continuing the argument.
b. To prevent or restrain: An invitation to dinner stopped him from going to the movies.
7. To discontinue or cease: He stopped his complaining.
8.
a. To defeat (an opponent or opposing team).
b. To defeat in boxing by a knockout or technical knockout.
9. To order a bank to withhold payment of: stopped the check.
10. Music
a. To press down (a string on a stringed instrument) on the fingerboard to produce a desired pitch.
b. To close (a hole on a wind instrument) with the finger in sounding a desired pitch.
v.intr.
1. To cease moving, progressing, acting, or operating; come to a halt: The clock stopped in the night.
2. To put an end to what one is doing; cease: had to stop at an exciting place in the book.
3. To interrupt one's course or journey for a brief visit or stay. Often used with by, in, or off: stop by at a friend's house; stop in at the office; stop off at the gas station.
n.
1. The act of stopping or the condition of being stopped: Can't you put a stop to all this ruckus? Production is at a stop.
2. A halt or stay, as on a trip: We made a stop in Austin.
3. A place at which someone or something stops: a regular stop on my delivery route; a bus stop.
4. A device or means that obstructs, blocks, or plugs up.
5. An order given to a bank to withhold payment on a check.
6. A stop order.
7. A part in a mechanism that stops or regulates movement.
8. The effective aperture of a lens, controlled by a diaphragm.
9. A mark of punctuation, especially a period.
10. Music
a. The act of stopping a string or hole on an instrument.
b. A fret on a stringed instrument.
c. A hole on a wind instrument.
d. A device such as a key for closing the hole on a wind instrument.
e. A tuned set of pipes, as in an organ.
f. A knob, key, or pull that regulates such a set of pipes.
11. Nautical A line used for securing something temporarily: a sail stop.
12.
a. Linguistics One of a set of speech sounds that is a plosive or a nasal.
b. A plosive.
13. The depression between the muzzle and top of the skull of an animal, especially a dog.
14. Sports A save made by a goalie.
15. Games A stopper.
16. Architecture A projecting stone, often carved, at the end of a molding.
17. A control mechanism on an audio or video player that causes a recording to stop playing.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being of use at the end of an operation or activity: a stop code.
Phrasal Verbs:
stop down
To reduce (the aperture) of a lens.
stop out
To withdraw temporarily from college.

[Middle English stoppen, from Old English -stoppian, probably from Vulgar Latin *stuppāre, to caulk, from Latin stuppa, tow, broken flax, from Greek stuppē.]

stop′pa·ble adj.
Synonyms: stop, cease, desist, discontinue, halt1, quit
These verbs mean to bring or come to an end: stop arguing; ceased crying; desist from complaining; discontinued the treatment; halting the convoy; quit laughing.
Antonym: start

stopping

(ˈstɒpɪŋ)
n
1. (Dentistry) informal Brit a dental filling
2. (Mining & Quarrying) a solid barrier in a mine tunnel to seal off harmful gases, fire, fresh air from used air, etc
adj
chiefly Brit making many stops in a journey: a stopping train.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.stopping - fastener consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members
fastening, holdfast, fastener, fixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
2.stopping - the kind of playing that involves pressing the fingers on the strings of a stringed instrument to control the pitch; "the violinist's stopping was excellent"
playing - the act of playing a musical instrument
double stopping - stopping two strings and producing two notes at the same time
Translations
سِدادَة السِّن
plomba
fyldning
fylling

stopping

[ˈstɒpɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= halting) [of activity, progress, process] → suspensión f, interrupción f; [of vehicle] → detención f, parada f; [of cheque, wages] → bloqueo m, retención f; [of match, game, payment] → suspensión f; [of allowance, leave, privileges] → retirada f
2. (= filling) [of tooth] → empaste m
3. (= blocking) [of hole, pipe, leak] → relleno m, sellado m
B. CPD stopping place Nparadero m; [of bus] → parada f
stopping train Ntren m correo, tren m ómnibus

stopping

n stopping and starting (in driving) → stückchenweises Vorwärtskommen, Stop-and-go-Verkehr m; (in work) → ständige Unterbrechungen pl

stopping

:
stopping place
n (of bus, train etc)Haltestelle f; this is an ideal stoppingdas ist ein idealer Platz zum Haltmachen
stopping train
n (esp Brit) → Personenzug m

stopping

[ˈstɒpɪŋ]
1. n (gen) → arresto (fam) (in tooth) → otturazione f
2. adj stopping place (lay-by) → piazzola di sosta
we found a good stopping place → abbiamo trovato un bel posto per fare una sosta
stopping train → (treno) locale m

stop

(stop) past tense, past participle stopped verb
1. to (make something) cease moving, or come to rest, a halt etc. He stopped the car and got out; This train does not stop at Birmingham; He stopped to look at the map; He signalled with his hand to stop the bus.
2. to prevent from doing something. We must stop him (from) going; I was going to say something rude but stopped myself just in time.
3. to discontinue or cease eg doing something. That woman just can't stop talking; The rain has stopped; It has stopped raining.
4. to block or close. He stopped his ears with his hands when she started to shout at him.
5. to close (a hole, eg on a flute) or press down (a string on a violin etc) in order to play a particular note.
6. to stay. Will you be stopping long at the hotel?
noun
1. an act of stopping or state of being stopped. We made only two stops on our journey; Work came to a stop for the day.
2. a place for eg a bus to stop. a bus stop.
3. in punctuation, a full stop. Put a stop at the end of the sentence.
4. a device on a flute etc for covering the holes in order to vary the pitch, or knobs for bringing certain pipes into use on an organ.
5. a device, eg a wedge etc, for stopping the movement of something, or for keeping it in a fixed position. a door-stop.
ˈstoppage (-pidʒ) noun
(an) act of stopping or state or process of being stopped. The building was at last completed after many delays and stoppages.
ˈstopper noun
an object, eg a cork, that is put into the neck of a bottle, jar, hole etc to close it.
ˈstopping noun
a filling in a tooth. One of my stoppings has come out.
ˈstopcock noun
a tap and valve for controlling flow of liquid through a pipe.
ˈstopgap noun
a person or thing that fills a gap in an emergency. He was made headmaster as a stopgap till a new man could be appointed; (also adjective) stopgap arrangements.
ˈstopwatch noun
a watch with a hand that can be stopped and started, used in timing a race etc.
put a stop to
to prevent from continuing. We must put a stop to this waste.
stop at nothing
to be willing to do anything, however dishonest etc, in order to get something. He'll stop at nothing to get what he wants.
stop dead
to stop completely. I stopped dead when I saw him.
stop off
to make a halt on a journey etc. We stopped off at Edinburgh to see the castle.
stop over to make a stay of a night or more: We're planning to stop over in Amsterdam ( noun ˈstop-over)
stop up
to block. Some rubbish got into the drain and stopped it up.
References in classic literature ?
This he did, stopping at the home of Mary Nestor, a pretty girl, who, rumor had it, was tacitly engaged to Tom.
They formed a congenial group sitting there that summer afternoon--Madame Ratignolle sewing away, often stopping to relate a story or incident with much expressive gesture of her perfect hands; Robert and Mrs.
Notwithstanding the swiftness of their flight, one of the Indians had found an opportunity to strike a straggling fawn with an arrow, and had borne the more preferable fragments of the victim, patiently on his shoulders, to the stopping place.
asked Pearl, stopping short, just at the beginning of her race.
They harried his hitherto peaceful domains, smoked out his singing- school by stopping up the chimney, broke into the schoolhouse at night, in spite of its formidable fastenings of withe and window stakes, and turned everything topsy-turvy, so that the poor schoolmaster began to think all the witches in the country held their meetings there.
The scholars were hurried through their lessons without stopping at trifles; those who were nimble skipped over half with impunity, and those who were tardy had a smart application now and then in the rear, to quicken their speed or help them over a tall word.
In this state of mind I spent the long hours of bumping, swinging coach that carried me to the stopping place at which I was to be met by a vehicle from the house.
get away from before the door; your patched boots are stopping the way.
I had a very good mouth -- that is I could be guided by the slightest touch of the rein; and that is a great thing in London, among carriages, omnibuses, carts, vans, trucks, cabs, and great wagons creeping along at a walking pace; some going one way, some another, some going slowly, others wanting to pass them; omnibuses stopping short every few minutes to take up a passenger, obliging the horse that is coming behind to pull up too, or to pass, and get before them; perhaps you try to pass, but just then something else comes dashing in through the narrow opening, and you have to keep in behind the omnibus again; presently you think you see a chance, and manage to get to the front, going so near the wheels on each side that half an inch nearer and they would scrape.
No one can get away from it, or even think of getting away from it; it is three o'clock in the morning, and they have danced out all their joy, and danced out all their strength, and all the strength that unlimited drink can lend them--and still there is no one among them who has the power to think of stopping.