storm


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storm

 (stôrm)
n.
1. An atmospheric disturbance manifested in strong winds accompanied by rain, snow, or other precipitation and often by thunder and lightning.
2. A wind with a speed from 48 to 55 knots (55 to 63 miles per hour; 89 to 102 kilometers per hour), according to the Beaufort scale. Also called whole gale.
3. A heavy shower of objects, such as bullets or missiles.
4. A strong or violent outburst, as of emotion or excitement: a storm of tears.
5. A violent disturbance or upheaval, as in political, social, or domestic affairs: a storm of protest.
6. A violent, sudden attack on a fortified place.
7. A storm window.
v. stormed, storm·ing, storms
v.intr.
1. To blow with strong winds and usually produce copious rain, snow, or other precipitation: It stormed throughout the night.
2. To behave or shout angrily; rant and rage: stormed at his incompetence.
3. To move or rush tumultuously, violently, or angrily: stormed up the embankment; stormed out of the room.
v.tr.
1. To assault or capture suddenly: The troops stormed the fortress. See Synonyms at attack.
2. To travel around (a place) vigorously in an attempt to gain support: The candidates stormed the country.
3. To shout angrily: "Never!" she stormed.
Idiom:
take by storm
To captivate completely: a new play that took New York City by storm.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

storm

(stɔːm)
n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. a violent weather condition of strong winds, rain, hail, thunder, lightning, blowing sand, snow, etc
b. (as modifier): storm signal; storm sail.
c. (in combination): stormproof.
2. (Physical Geography) meteorol a violent gale of force 10 on the Beaufort scale reaching speeds of 55 to 63 mph
3. a strong or violent reaction: a storm of protest.
4. a direct assault on a stronghold
5. a heavy discharge or rain, as of bullets or missiles
6. (Building) short for storm window1
7. storm in a teacup Brit a violent fuss or disturbance over a trivial matter. US equivalent: tempest in a teapot
8. take by storm
a. to capture or overrun by a violent assault
b. to overwhelm and enthral
9. (Military) to capture or overrun by a violent assault
10. to overwhelm and enthral
vb
11. to attack or capture (something) suddenly and violently
12. (intr) to be vociferously angry
13. (intr) to move or rush violently or angrily
14. (Physical Geography) (intr; with it as subject) to rain, hail, or snow hard and be very windy, often with thunder or lightning
[Old English, related to Old Norse stormr, German Sturm; see stir1]
ˈstormˌlike adj

storm

(stɔrm)

n.
1. a disturbance of normal atmospheric conditions, manifesting itself by strong winds and often accompanied by rain, thunder and lightning, snow, hail, or sleet.
2. an instance of heavy precipitation unaccompanied by strong winds.
3. a wind of 64–72 mph (29–32 m/sec).
4. a violent military assault, esp. on a fortified place or strong position.
5. a heavy or sudden volley or discharge: a storm of bullets.
6. a tumultuous condition; commotion.
7. a violent outburst or outbreak of expression: a storm of abuse.
v.i.
9. (of the wind or weather) to blow with unusual force, or to rain, snow, hail, etc., esp. heavily (usu. used impersonally with it as subject): It stormed all day.
10. to rage or complain with violence or fury.
11. to rush angrily: He stormed out of the room.
12. to deliver a violent attack or fire, as with artillery.
13. to rush to an assault or attack.
v.t.
14. to subject to or as if to a storm.
15. to attack or assault: to storm a fortress.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English, Old English, c. Old Saxon storm, Old High German sturm, Old Norse stormr; probably akin to stir1]

Storm

 a shower or flight of objects; a passionate outburst.
Examples: storm of applause, 1832; of arrows, 1667; of blows, 1817; of bullets, 1615; of eloquence, 1712; of fate, 1713; of galloping hoofs, 1847; of invective, 1849; of music, 1781; of prayers, 1842; of shot, 1849; of sighs, tears, or plaints, 1602; of snow, 1681; of sobs; of thoughts, 1569; of weeping, 1891; of whistlings, 1615; of words, 1693; of wrath.

storm


Past participle: stormed
Gerund: storming

Imperative
storm
storm
Present
I storm
you storm
he/she/it storms
we storm
you storm
they storm
Preterite
I stormed
you stormed
he/she/it stormed
we stormed
you stormed
they stormed
Present Continuous
I am storming
you are storming
he/she/it is storming
we are storming
you are storming
they are storming
Present Perfect
I have stormed
you have stormed
he/she/it has stormed
we have stormed
you have stormed
they have stormed
Past Continuous
I was storming
you were storming
he/she/it was storming
we were storming
you were storming
they were storming
Past Perfect
I had stormed
you had stormed
he/she/it had stormed
we had stormed
you had stormed
they had stormed
Future
I will storm
you will storm
he/she/it will storm
we will storm
you will storm
they will storm
Future Perfect
I will have stormed
you will have stormed
he/she/it will have stormed
we will have stormed
you will have stormed
they will have stormed
Future Continuous
I will be storming
you will be storming
he/she/it will be storming
we will be storming
you will be storming
they will be storming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been storming
you have been storming
he/she/it has been storming
we have been storming
you have been storming
they have been storming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been storming
you will have been storming
he/she/it will have been storming
we will have been storming
you will have been storming
they will have been storming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been storming
you had been storming
he/she/it had been storming
we had been storming
you had been storming
they had been storming
Conditional
I would storm
you would storm
he/she/it would storm
we would storm
you would storm
they would storm
Past Conditional
I would have stormed
you would have stormed
he/she/it would have stormed
we would have stormed
you would have stormed
they would have stormed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.storm - a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightningstorm - a violent weather condition with winds 64-72 knots (11 on the Beaufort scale) and precipitation and thunder and lightning
storm center, storm centre - the central area or place of lowest barometric pressure within a storm
atmospheric phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the atmosphere
firestorm - a storm in which violent winds are drawn into the column of hot air rising over a severely bombed area
noreaster, northeaster - a storm blowing from the northeast
hailstorm - a storm during which hail falls
ice storm, silver storm - a storm with freezing rain that leaves everything glazed with ice
rainstorm - a storm with rain
blizzard, snowstorm - a storm with widespread snowfall accompanied by strong winds
electric storm, electrical storm, thunderstorm - a storm resulting from strong rising air currents; heavy rain or hail along with thunder and lightning
windstorm - a storm consisting of violent winds
Beaufort scale, wind scale - an international scale of wind force from 0 (calm air) to 12 (hurricane)
2.storm - a violent commotion or disturbancestorm - a violent commotion or disturbance; "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
3.storm - a direct and violent assault on a stronghold
assault - close fighting during the culmination of a military attack
Verb1.storm - behave violently, as if in state of a great anger
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
2.storm - take by force; "Storm the fort"
penetrate, perforate - pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; "The bullet penetrated her chest"
3.storm - rain, hail, or snow hard and be very windy, often with thunder or lightning; "If it storms, we'll need shelter"
4.storm - blow hard; "It was storming all night"
blow - be blowing or storming; "The wind blew from the West"
5.storm - attack by storm; attack suddenly
attack, assail - launch an attack or assault on; begin hostilities or start warfare with; "Hitler attacked Poland on September 1, 1939 and started World War II"; "Serbian forces assailed Bosnian towns all week"

storm

noun
1. tempest, blast, hurricane, gale, tornado, cyclone, blizzard, whirlwind, gust, squall the violent storms which whipped America's East Coast
2. outburst, row, stir, outcry, furore, violence, anger, passion, outbreak, turmoil, disturbance, strife, clamour, agitation, commotion, rumpus, tumult, hubbub The photos caused a storm when they were first published.
3. roar, thunder, clamour, din His speech was greeted with a storm of applause.
4. attack, rush, assault, offensive, blitz, onset, onslaught, blitzkrieg The attack was code-named Desert Storm.
5. barrage, volley, salvo, rain, shower, spray, discharge, fusillade a storm of missiles
verb
1. rush, stamp, flounce, fly, stalk, stomp (informal) After a bit of an argument, he stormed out.
2. rage, fume, rant, complain, thunder, rave, scold, bluster, go ballistic (slang, chiefly U.S.), fly off the handle (informal), wig out (slang) 'It's a fiasco,' he stormed.
3. attack, charge, rush, assault, beset, assail, take by storm The refugees decided to storm the embassy.

storm

noun
A concentrated outpouring, as of missiles, words, or blows:
verb
To set upon with violent force:
Translations
عاصِفَةعاصِفَة من المَشاعِرعاصِفَهيَخْرُجُ غاضِبايَصْرُخ بِغَضَب
bouřebouřitvyrazitvzít útokemzuřit
stormstormestormvejrudbruduvejr
myrskymyrskytuulitulimyrskykeskitys
oluja
rákiabálviharviharzik
æîagera áhlauphrópa reiîilega, hella sér yfir meî ofsastormurtilfinningastormur; fagnaîarlæti
強襲暴風猛攻撃
폭풍
audraaudringumasaudrotasdaug triukšmo dėl niekoįniršio apimtas
vētrabrāztiesdrāztieskliegtnegaiss
prudko zaútočiť
divjatinevihtapeščeni viharsnežni viharvihar
storm
พายุ
fırtınafırtına gibi ...-mekheyecanhiddetle ...-meköfkeyle bağırmak
cơn bão

storm

[stɔːm]
A. N
1. (gen) → tormenta f, tempestad f; (= gale) → vendaval m; (= hurricane) → huracán m (Naut) → borrasca f, tormenta f
to brave the stormaguantar la tempestad
to ride out a stormcapear un temporal, hacer frente a un temporal
2. (= uproar) → escándalo m, bronca f
there was a political stormhubo un gran revuelo político
it caused an international stormlevantó una polvareda internacional
a storm of abuseun torrente de injurias
a storm of applauseuna salva de aplausos
a storm of criticismun aluvión or vendaval de críticas
a storm in a teacup (Brit) → una tormenta or tempestad en un vaso de agua
3. to take by storm: to take a town by storm (Mil) → tomar una ciudad por asalto
the play took Paris by stormla obra cautivó a todo París
B. VT (Mil) → asaltar, tomar por asalto
angry ratepayers stormed the town halllos contribuyentes enfurecidos asaltaron or invadieron el ayuntamiento
C. VI
1. (= move angrily) he came storming into my officeentró en mi despacho echando pestes
he stormed out of the meetingsalió de la reunión como un huracán
2. (= speak angrily) → bramar, vociferar
"you're fired!" he stormed-¡quedá despedido! -bramó or vociferó
to storm at sbtronar contra algn, enfurecerse con algn
he stormed on for an hour about the governmentpasó una hora lanzando improperios contra el gobierno
D. CPD storm centre, storm center (US) Ncentro m de la tempestad (fig) → foco m de los disturbios, centro m de la agitación
storm cloud Nnubarrón m
storm door Ncontrapuerta f
storm signal Nseñal f de temporal
storm trooper N (Mil) → guardia mf de asalto
storm troops NPL (Mil) → tropas fpl de asalto, guardia fsing de asalto
storm window Ncontraventana f

storm

[ˈstɔːrm]
n
(= violent weather) → tempête f (= thunderstorm) → orage m
(= furore) → tempête f
The photos caused a storm → Les photos ont provoqué une tempête.
a storm of criticism → une tempête de critiques, une tempête de protestations
(= roar) [applause, booing] → tonnerre m
vi (= charge) to storm in → entrer en trombe
to storm out → sortir en trombe
After the argument, he stormed out of the house → Après la dispute, il sortit en trombe.
vt [+ building] → prendre d'assautstorm cloud n (lit)nuage m d'oragestorm damage ndégâts mpl causés par la tempêtestorm door ncontre-porte f

storm

n
Unwetter nt; (= thunderstorm)Gewitter nt; (= strong wind)Sturm m; there is a storm blowinges stürmt; come in out of the stormkommen Sie herein ins Trockene; to brave the stormdem Unwetter/Gewitter/Sturm trotzen; (fig)das Gewitter über sich (acc)ergehen lassen; a storm in a teacup (Brit fig) → ein Sturm im Wasserglas
(fig, of abuse, insults) → Flut f(of von); (of applause, indignation, criticism)Sturm m (→ of +gen); (of blows, arrows, missiles)Hagel m(of von); (= outcry)Aufruhr m; storm of protestProteststurm m; storm and stressSturm und Drang m
to take something/somebody by storm (Mil, fig) → etw/jdn im Sturm erobern
vtstürmen
vi
(= talk angrily)toben, wüten (at gegen); he stormed on for an hour about the governmenter schimpfte eine Stunde lang wütend über die Regierung
(= move violently)stürmen; to storm out of/into a roomaus einem/in ein Zimmer stürmen
(esp US Met) → stürmen

storm

:
storm-beaten
adj seasturmgepeitscht
stormbound
storm centre, (US) storm center
nSturmzentrum nt; (fig)Unruheherd m
storm cloud
n (lit, fig)Gewitterwolke f
storm cone
nSturmkegel m
storm door
näußere Windfangtür
storm force
nWindstärke f
storm-force
adj windmit Sturmstärke wehend

storm

:
storm lantern
nSturmlaterne f
storm-lashed
adj seasturmgepeitscht
storm petrel
nSturmschwalbe f
stormproof
adjsturmsicher
storm signal
nSturmsignal nt
storm-tossed
adj (liter)sturmgepeitscht (liter)
storm trooper
n (NS) → SA-Mann m
storm troopers
pl(Sonder)einsatzkommando nt
storm troops
plSturmtruppe f
storm warning
nSturmwarnung f
storm window

storm

[stɔːm]
1. n
a. (Met) → tempesta; (at sea) → burrasca, tempesta; (thunderstorm) → temporale m (fig) (of applause) → scroscio; (of abuse) → torrente m; (of protests) → uragano; (of weeping, tears) → mare m; (uproar) → scompiglio
it caused a storm (fig) → ha creato scompiglio
a storm in a teacup (fig) → una tempesta in un bicchier d'acqua
b. (Mil) to take a town by stormprendere d'assalto una città
the play took Paris by storm (fig) → la commedia ha trionfato a Parigi
2. vt (Mil) → prendere d'assalto
3. vi (wind, rain) → infuriare; (person) to storm in/outentrare/uscire come una furia
she stormed up the stairs → si è precipitata di sopra furiosa
"get out!" she stormed → "fuori!" urlò
4. adj (signal, warning) → di burrasca

storm

(stoːm) noun
1. a violent disturbance in the air causing wind, rain, thunder etc. a rainstorm; a thunderstorm; a storm at sea; The roof was damaged by the storm.
2. a violent outbreak of feeling etc. A storm of anger greeted his speech; a storm of applause.
verb
1. to shout very loudly and angrily. He stormed at her.
2. to move or stride in an angry manner. He stormed out of the room.
3. (of soldiers etc) to attack with great force, and capture (a building etc). They stormed the castle.
ˈstormy adjective
1. having a lot of strong wind, heavy rain etc. a stormy day; stormy weather; a stormy voyage.
2. full of anger or uncontrolled feeling. in a stormy mood; a stormy discussion.
ˈstormily adverb
ˈstorminess noun
ˈstormbound adjective
prevented by storms from continuing with a voyage, receiving regular supplies etc. stormbound ships.
ˈstormtrooper noun
a soldier specially trained for violent and dangerous attacks.
a storm in a teacup
a fuss made over an unimportant matter.
take by storm
to capture by means of a sudden violent attack. The invaders took the city by storm.

storm

عاصِفَة bouře storm Sturm καταιγίδα tormenta myrsky tempête oluja tempesta 폭풍 storm storm burza tempestade буря storm พายุ fırtına cơn bão 风暴

storm

n. tormenta; intensificación repentina de síntomas de una enfermedad.
References in classic literature ?
Her employer, a grey old man with false teeth and a thin grey mustache that drooped down over his mouth, was not given to conversation, and sometimes, on rainy days and in the winter when a storm raged in Main Street, long hours passed when no customers came in.
And yet it looks as though the storm would be a bad one.
The cold was not severe, but the storm was quiet and resistless.
Here are no dead," said Heyward; "the storm seems not to have passed this way.
Death was preferable to captivity; and if taken by storm, we must inevitably be devoted to destruction.
The aspect of the venerable mansion has always affected me like a human countenance, bearing the traces not merely of outward storm and sunshine, but expressive also, of the long lapse of mortal life, and accompanying vicissitudes that have passed within.
It pained, and at the same time amused me, to behold the terrors that attended my advent, to see a furrowed cheek, weather-beaten by half a century of storm, turn ashy pale at the glance of so harmless an individual as myself; to detect, as one or another addressed me, the tremor of a voice which, in long-past days, had been wont to bellow through a speaking-trumpet, hoarsely enough to frighten Boreas himself to silence.
Then, as he wended his way by swamp and stream and awful woodland, to the farmhouse where he happened to be quartered, every sound of nature, at that witching hour, fluttered his excited imagination, --the moan of the whip-poor-will from the hillside, the boding cry of the tree toad, that harbinger of storm, the dreary hooting of the screech owl, to the sudden rustling in the thicket of birds frightened from their roost.
My companion still demurred: the storm of the night and the early morning had dropped, but the afternoon was damp and gray.
Hecla in a snow storm, -- landlord, stop whittling.
But the mingled, mingling threads of life are woven by warp and woof: calms crossed by storms, a storm for every calm.
The opera proceeded, it was a piece with a storm in it; the mimic thunder began to mutter, the mimic wind began to wail and sough, and the mimic rain to patter.