storming


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storm

 (stôrm)
n.
1. An atmospheric disturbance manifested in strong winds accompanied by rain, snow, or other precipitation and often by thunder and lightning.
2. A wind with a speed from 48 to 55 knots (55 to 63 miles per hour; 89 to 102 kilometers per hour), according to the Beaufort scale. Also called whole gale.
3. A heavy shower of objects, such as bullets or missiles.
4. A strong or violent outburst, as of emotion or excitement: a storm of tears.
5. A violent disturbance or upheaval, as in political, social, or domestic affairs: a storm of protest.
6. A violent, sudden attack on a fortified place.
7. A storm window.
v. stormed, storm·ing, storms
v.intr.
1. To blow with strong winds and usually produce copious rain, snow, or other precipitation: It stormed throughout the night.
2. To behave or shout angrily; rant and rage: stormed at his incompetence.
3. To move or rush tumultuously, violently, or angrily: stormed up the embankment; stormed out of the room.
v.tr.
1. To assault or capture suddenly: The troops stormed the fortress. See Synonyms at attack.
2. To travel around (a place) vigorously in an attempt to gain support: The candidates stormed the country.
3. To shout angrily: "Never!" she stormed.
Idiom:
take by storm
To captivate completely: a new play that took New York City by storm.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

storming

(ˈstɔːmɪŋ)
adj
informal characterized by or displaying dynamism, speed, and energy: a storming performance.
Translations

storming

[ˈstɔːmɪŋ]
A. (= impressive) → arrollador, arrasador
B. N (Mil etc) → asalto m (of a)

storming

adj (inf: = impressive) performance, comebackstürmisch
References in classic literature ?
The private difference between my cousin and me took its rise in a great public event in which we were both concerned-- the storming of Seringapatam, under General Baird, on the 4th of May, 1799.